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REPO Man
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by REPO Man Tue Dec 24, 2019 2:51 am

Beat Nemo for arcade on default difficulty (medium iirc).
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MrPopo
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by MrPopo Wed Dec 25, 2019 1:15 am

First 50:
1. Octopath Traveler - Switch
2. Dusk - PC
3. Forsaken Remastered - PC
4. Tales of Eternia - PS1
5. Resident Evil 2 (2019) - PC
6. Pokémon Trading Card Game - GBC
7. Metro Exodus - PC
8. Thronebreaker: The Witcher Tales - PC
9. Project Warlock - PC
10. Magic: The Gathering - PC
11. Ghost 1.0 - PC
12. Call of Duty 2 - PC
13. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice - PS4
14. Revelations: The Demon Slayer - GBC
15. Mechstermination Force - Switch
16. Shadow Warrior Classic Redux - PC
17. Lost Sphear - Switch
18. Warcraft II: Beyond the Dark Portal - PC
19. Dragon Quest III - NES
20. Rage 2 - PC
21. Blood - PC
22. Harvest Moon 64 - N64
23. Battlefield V - PC
24. Sigil - PC
25. Shining Force III: Scenario 2 - Saturn
26. Shining Force III: Scenario 3 - Saturn
27. Borderlands 2: Commander Lillith and the Fight for Sanctuary - PC
28. Gato Roboto - Switch
29. Timespinner - Switch
30. Amid Evil - PC
31. Pillars of Eternity II: Beast of Winter - PC
32. Pillars of Eternity II: Seeker, Slayer, Survivor - PC
33. Pillars of Eternity II: The Forgotten Sanctum - PC
34. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night - Switch
35. Orphan - PC
36. Project Nimbus - PC
37. Hardcore Mecha - PC
38. Grey Goo - PC
39. Giants: Citizen Kabuto - PC
40. Wolfenstein: Youngblood - PC
41. Fire Emblem: Three Houses - Switch
42. Metal Wolf Chaos XD - PC
43. Ion Fury - PC
44. Final Fantasy Adventure - GB
45. Astral Chain - Switch
46. Rebel Galaxy Outlaw - PC
47. Blasphemous - Switch
48. Daemon x Machina - Switch
49. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening - Switch
50. Borderlands 3 - PC

51. Valfaris - Switch
52. Unreal: Return to Na Pali - PC
53. The Outer Worlds - PC
54. MechWarrior 4: Black Knight - PC
55. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare - PC
56. Deus Ex: Mankind Divided: System Rift - PC
57. MDK - PC
58. Pokémon Sword - Switch
59. Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order - PC
60. Blazing Chrome - Switch
61. MDK 2 - PC
62. Heavy Gear - PC
63. Virtual-On - Saturn
64. Virtual-On: Oratorio Tangram - DC
65. MechWarrior 5: Mercenaries - PC
66. Metaltech: Earthsiege - PC
67. Earthsiege 2 - PC
68. Cthulhu Saves Christmas - PC

Cthulhu Saves Christmas is a short prequel to Cthulhu Saves the World done in the same combat engine that Zeboyd used for Cosmic Star Heroine. It tells a tale of Cthulhu's first exposure to the idea that there is more to life than just destroying the world. Also, you get to beat up a variety of Christmas-adjacent bosses who have conspired to steal Christmas.

The basic plot is that Cthulhu gets a Christmas present that steals his powers. Enraged, he goes off to beat up Santa. But he finds out from Santa's granddaughter that Santa was kidnapped and the dastardly fiends who did so have been giving out reverse Christmas presents (so the opposite of what you wanted). So Cthulhu reluctantly agrees to restore Santa to his rightful place so that he can get his powers back so that he can destroy the world.

Because this is a short game mostly for the dev team to have fun with, things are a bit bare bones. You go through a series of dungeons with some treasures and beat a boss at the end. Afterwards you go back to town, which is menu based, to waste some time. The way you do so is you decide to go visit some place or person in town. This will give you a reward (equipment or an item) and give you a bit of character development. It takes a very slight cue from Persona in this regard; the more you visit one place the better the rewards get and eventually you will have built a R'ylethionship with the character, which gives you a great item. You'll also visit those people once you beat the final boss. You only have a limited amount of time and there are far more places than time, so you can't do it all. So there's a bit of replay value inherent there.

As mentioned, the combat is taken from Cosmic Star Heroine. It's based around an action economy wherein your actions can only be used once (aside from a handful that specifically say they can be reused, or be granted that status through equipment). To recharge your actions you have to use your defense action; this increases your defense for a turn and recharges all your abilities. Additionally, every several turns (it varies depending on the character) you enter a super mode which improves all your abilities for that turn. So figuring out when to use stuff and when to recharge to maximize things is important. Unique to this game is that three of your eight slots are random. They pull from a bespoke list of insanity abilities as well as any regular ability you haven't assigned. Every time you recharge it will reroll these abilities, so it can be very worthwhile to recharge abilities early to reroll for something more advantageous for the situation. Finally, every character pair has an ability that can be used once per combat. The ability starts off very weak, at 10% power. It gains 10% power every time the initiating character takes a turn, up to a maximum of 100%. Activating it when you are in super mode gives an effective 20% boost, up to the 100% cap. These can make regular fights go much faster, and using them at the right time in boss fights is important.

Aside from all that, we have the two standards of Zeboyd games; self-aware humor and limited encounters. Every dungeon has a counter in it, and it goes down every time you get in an encounter (which includes summoning one from the menu). Once it hits 0 you never get another random encounter, though you can still pull them from the menu if you want to grind. The game also lets you avoid an encounter by hitting Enter when an exclamation appears right before a combat initiates. As for the humor, it's still very well written and since Cthulhu is a silly premise to begin with it is VERY fourth wall breaking and targeted to long time JRPG fans. It's definitely the highlight of the game.

The whole experience takes about 6 hours to get through, which is at just the right length to not overstay its welcome. There's just enough depth in ability setups to keep your interest, but if the game were much longer they would have needed to put in a lot more story and non-combat exploration to break things up. But trying to stretch the premise that far would have fallen flat, so the devs demonstrated a good awareness of how long their game should be. If you're a fan of JRPGs and enjoy some irreverence then I recommend it, especially if you've enjoyed any of Zeboyd's work up to now.
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Games Beaten: 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Blizzard Entertainment Software Developer - All comments and views are my own and not representative of the company.
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PartridgeSenpai
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by PartridgeSenpai Wed Dec 25, 2019 2:25 am

Partridge Senpai's 2019 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018
* indicates a repeat

1. Night Slashers (Switch)
2. Bye-Bye BOXBOY! (3DS)
3. GTA4: The Ballad of Gay Tony (Xbox 360)
4. Katamari Forever (PS3)
5. Detention (PS4)
6. Donkey Kong 64 (N64) *
7. OctoDad: Dadliest Catch (PS4) *
8. FlintHook (Switch)
9. God of War (PS4)
10. God of War HD (PS3)
11. Tiny Barbarian DX (Switch)
12. God of War 2 HD (PS3)
13. Starlink (Switch)
14. Shin Gundam Musou (PS3)
15. Battle & Get! Pokemon Typing DS (DS)
16. Banjo-Kazooie (N64) *
17. Super Mario 64: Rumble Edition (N64)
18. Mario Party 3 (N64) *
19. Paper Mario (N64) *
20. The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (SNES) *
21. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX (GBC) *
22. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages (GBC) *
23. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons (GBC) *
24. Yoshi's Island (SNES) *
25. Super Mario World (SNES) *
26. Super Mario RPG (SFC) *
27. Kaeru No Tame Ni Kane Wa Naru (GB)
28. Final Fantasy VI (SFC) *
29. Final Fantasy IV (SFC) *
30. Final Fantasy V (SFC)
31. Final Fantasy III (Famicom)
32. Mother 2 (SFC) *
33. Mother 3 (GBA) *
34. Hebereke (Famicom)
35. Donkey Kong Country 2 (SFC)
36. Donkey Kong Country 3 (SFC)
37. Donkey Kong Country (SFC) *
38. Wario's Woods (Famicom)
39. Paper Mario: Color Splash (Wii U)
40. Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam (3DS)
41. Luigi's Mansion (3DS) *
42. Paper Mario: Sticker Star (3DS)
43. Mario & Luigi Superstar Saga & Bowser's Minions (3DS)
44. Mario & Luigi: Bowser's Inside Story & Bowser Jr's Journey (3DS)
45. Tomato Adventure (GBA)
46. Corpse Party (PSP)
47. Rave Master: Fighting Live (GC)
48. Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow (GBA) *
49. Castlevania: Circle of the Moon (GBA)
50. Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance (GBA) *
51. New Super Mario Bros. 2 (3DS)
52. The Outer Worlds (Xbone)
53. Momodora: Reverie Under the Moonlight (Xbone)
54. Guacamelee 2 (Xbone)
55. Steamworld Dig 2 (Xbone)
56. Yoku's Island Express (Xbone)
57. Guacamelee (Xbone) *
58. Blazing Chrome (Xbone)
59. Minit (Xbone)
60. Dishonored 2 (Xbone)
61. Deus Ex: Mankind Divided (Xbone)
62. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night (Xbone)
63. Recore: Definitive Edition (Xbone)
64. Ori and the Blind Forest: Definitive Edition (Xbone)
65. Super Lucky's Tale (Xbone)
66. Snake Pass (Xbone)
67. My Friend Pedro - Blood Bullets Bananas (Xbone)

68. Kirby 64: Legend of the Crystal Shards (N64) *

I was really stressing out about my driving test yesterday, so I decided to boot up an old favorite to help take my mind off of it. It's been a few years since I've played Kirby 64, but I played it a TON when I was little, and I remember it very fondly~. Part of my love for it is certainly down to nostalgia, but I think it still holds up really well among the increasingly large pantheon of Kirby games. I got all the shards to get the real final boss, and it took me around 5 or 6 hours. I played through the Japanese version, but aside from some very small cosmetic differences, it's identical to its international counterparts.

An evil darkness has attacked a planet of fairies and shattered their giant crystal. One of the fairies, Ribbon, takes a larger crystal shard and is flung to the far off planet of Pop Star where she plummets onto Kirby's head. Kirby quickly agrees to help his new friend and they team up with Waddle Dee, Adeleine the painter, and King Dedede to save the solar system from these evil black blobs. As in the manner of Kirby games before it, the story is told with no words through brief cutscenes that play between worlds. Your friends largely play cosmetic roles, but they occasionally hop in to aid Kirby and add a special section to the gameplay. Waddle Dee provides vehicles for minecart sections (like DKC but nowhere near as brutal), you can hop on Dedede's back for hammer swinging action, and you'll sometimes pass Adeleine and she'll paint a powerup (health or a 1up) that will come to life to aid you.

The gameplay otherwise is fairly standard Kirby with some new twists. 22 stages across 6 worlds with 7 boss fights, it's not a super long game, but it's definitely longer if you're going to try and find all the crystal shards to fight the real final boss. There are 3 hidden within each non-boss stage, and they're either a reward for beating a mini-boss, a reward for completing a simple puzzle, hidden in the stage, or hidden behind a colored bit of level that you need a special power or power combo to break.

Kirby's animal friends may be gone from the Kirby's Dream Land games, but the main gimmick for this Kirby game is that you can combine powers. You have many mainstays of Kirby, cutter, rock, fire, but you can combine them with themselves or one another to make all new powers! Combining powers just to see what they'll be is still something that makes me smile all these years later. You can either combine a power with another of itself for an upgrade of that power (cutter + cutter = BIG cutter blade) or combine them with other powers for all new stuff (cutter + electric = double-bladed lightsaber, one of my personal favorites X3). This does however mean that most of the powers are just "press B to make power", and most powers have virtually no directional inputs to change how they work (like how powers worked in Kirby Super Star).

The presentation is colorful, happy, and very Kirby. Cute enemies, cute powers, cute allies, it's nothing out of the ordinary for Kirby of this era. The music is fantastic though. This is easily one of the best soundtracks on the N64 in my book.

The only real negatives I can say about it, other than that the solutions and locations for some of the shards can be a bit obtuse at times, is the lack of any co-op. The co-op in Kirby Super Star is one of the reasons I adore that game as much as I do, and the lack of it here is very unfortunate. There are some multiplayer competitive mini-games you can play from the game's main screen, which are all games I've had good fun with friends with in the past, but it's hardly a replacement for Super Star-style co-op play. The game is also harder than I remembered it was. Newer Kirby games are certainly quite easy, but a lack of tons of healing items in later stages as well as the use of the Kirby's Dream Land 6-hit health bar system means you can't just barrel through a level and probably be okay. You do have to try at least a little XP

Verdict: Highly Recommended. One of my favorite Kirby games and always will be. The power combo gimmick is a really strong one that I really wish newer Kirby games had at least tried to experiment with a bit more. Given that this is on the Wii Kirby Anniversary Collection, I'm not sure the game is worth hunting down on its own if you're gonna pay a big bundle for it, but if you're fixin' for Kirby and want a good one, it's hard to find much better Kirby than this UwU
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MrPopo
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by MrPopo Wed Dec 25, 2019 3:44 pm

First 50:
1. Octopath Traveler - Switch
2. Dusk - PC
3. Forsaken Remastered - PC
4. Tales of Eternia - PS1
5. Resident Evil 2 (2019) - PC
6. Pokémon Trading Card Game - GBC
7. Metro Exodus - PC
8. Thronebreaker: The Witcher Tales - PC
9. Project Warlock - PC
10. Magic: The Gathering - PC
11. Ghost 1.0 - PC
12. Call of Duty 2 - PC
13. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice - PS4
14. Revelations: The Demon Slayer - GBC
15. Mechstermination Force - Switch
16. Shadow Warrior Classic Redux - PC
17. Lost Sphear - Switch
18. Warcraft II: Beyond the Dark Portal - PC
19. Dragon Quest III - NES
20. Rage 2 - PC
21. Blood - PC
22. Harvest Moon 64 - N64
23. Battlefield V - PC
24. Sigil - PC
25. Shining Force III: Scenario 2 - Saturn
26. Shining Force III: Scenario 3 - Saturn
27. Borderlands 2: Commander Lillith and the Fight for Sanctuary - PC
28. Gato Roboto - Switch
29. Timespinner - Switch
30. Amid Evil - PC
31. Pillars of Eternity II: Beast of Winter - PC
32. Pillars of Eternity II: Seeker, Slayer, Survivor - PC
33. Pillars of Eternity II: The Forgotten Sanctum - PC
34. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night - Switch
35. Orphan - PC
36. Project Nimbus - PC
37. Hardcore Mecha - PC
38. Grey Goo - PC
39. Giants: Citizen Kabuto - PC
40. Wolfenstein: Youngblood - PC
41. Fire Emblem: Three Houses - Switch
42. Metal Wolf Chaos XD - PC
43. Ion Fury - PC
44. Final Fantasy Adventure - GB
45. Astral Chain - Switch
46. Rebel Galaxy Outlaw - PC
47. Blasphemous - Switch
48. Daemon x Machina - Switch
49. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening - Switch
50. Borderlands 3 - PC

51. Valfaris - Switch
52. Unreal: Return to Na Pali - PC
53. The Outer Worlds - PC
54. MechWarrior 4: Black Knight - PC
55. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare - PC
56. Deus Ex: Mankind Divided: System Rift - PC
57. MDK - PC
58. Pokémon Sword - Switch
59. Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order - PC
60. Blazing Chrome - Switch
61. MDK 2 - PC
62. Heavy Gear - PC
63. Virtual-On - Saturn
64. Virtual-On: Oratorio Tangram - DC
65. MechWarrior 5: Mercenaries - PC
66. Metaltech: Earthsiege - PC
67. Earthsiege 2 - PC
68. Cthulhu Saves Christmas - PC
69. Starsiege - PC

Starsiege is the last game in the Earthsiege trilogy, before the series turns into the Tribes series (and mostly drops the plot in favor of just being a multiplayer game like UT). Humanity has spread to the rest of the solar system and is ruled as a single Empire. However, the colonies are oppressed by the Terran government and rebel. While this rebelling is going on it turns out the Cybrids are hiding on Pluto and take advantage of the factionalism to invade for a third time. The Cybrid threat convinces humanity to ally again and make one last desperate push to take out the Cybrid leader Prometheus once and for all.

Starsiege finally updates the game, but unfortunately not for the better. Instead of going for a MechWarrior-esque torso twist system, you now instead just have a lot of range of motion on your guns. So you set throttle and turn left and right and your mouse controls where your guns fire. The traversal is impressive, and it properly models that if you're all the way to the left the guns on your right side can't fire, for example. By switching to this system they were able to introduce a lot of new mech designs that look like AT-PTs from Star Wars, as those wouldn't be able to accommodate the torso system of previous games. In whole this system ends up being not as good as what we see in MechWarrior at the same time, as the game is contemporary with MechWarrior 3 which had both torso twist and the fine grained aiming with the mouse. The real problem is you can't just do the circle of death because you can't traverse that far. Unless you're using one of the tanks, which is the new vehicle available. Tanks are faster than walkers and have a 360 degree turret, but they also don't have shields (they have higher armor to compensate). They're actually pretty solid vehicles, but their general lack of weapon mounts hurt them.

The real problem is in the weapons of the game. Everything you fight moves too fast and your weapons consist of hitscan with long cooldowns (so you miss a lot) and big damage weapons that have incredibly slow projectiles. This is a game you'll want to make heavy use of your AI partners, as they can aim much better than you. Frequently the best tactic is to bull rush a mech so that you both are facing each other and then hope your damage output is higher. The game does model location damage like before, but because everything moves so fast it's hard to take advantage of it except against the slowest of mechs. There is one weapon late in the game that removes the pain because of its huge auto tracking. The game would have done better with either larger mechs or slower mechs; the problem is everything is fast and thin. Or more rapid fire hitscan weapons that would let you make up for how zippy everything is (the autocannon is utter trash because it does virtually no shield damage).

The story campaign has some rough spots when you have to do protection missions; the things you protect die quite fast, so you need to nail enemy units immediately. Fortunately, the AI will switch to you when you shoot them over their defenseless target, so a strategy of taking potshots works. But sometimes you get screwed by a spawn you weren't aware of. You'll have to replay those missions a few times to learn spawn points so you can get there in time. The real highlight of the campaign is that your main mission briefing guy is Mark Hamill. And then late in the campaign his brother Mark Hamill-doing-a-gruff-voice joins in. It's mostly a middling performance; he's not trying hard, but he's also not just going "why the hell did I agree to this?"

Starsiege is frankly a bit of a letdown; they really bungled the overall combat physics and it's not nearly as fun to play as the previous two games, or any of the MechWarrior games. Add in some underutilized features (an artillery beacon used twice early in the game and never again, for example) and you have a game that really falls short of what it could be.
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Games Beaten: 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Blizzard Entertainment Software Developer - All comments and views are my own and not representative of the company.
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PartridgeSenpai
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by PartridgeSenpai Thu Dec 26, 2019 2:14 am

Partridge Senpai's 2019 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018
* indicates a repeat

1. Night Slashers (Switch)
2. Bye-Bye BOXBOY! (3DS)
3. GTA4: The Ballad of Gay Tony (Xbox 360)
4. Katamari Forever (PS3)
5. Detention (PS4)
6. Donkey Kong 64 (N64) *
7. OctoDad: Dadliest Catch (PS4) *
8. FlintHook (Switch)
9. God of War (PS4)
10. God of War HD (PS3)
11. Tiny Barbarian DX (Switch)
12. God of War 2 HD (PS3)
13. Starlink (Switch)
14. Shin Gundam Musou (PS3)
15. Battle & Get! Pokemon Typing DS (DS)
16. Banjo-Kazooie (N64) *
17. Super Mario 64: Rumble Edition (N64)
18. Mario Party 3 (N64) *
19. Paper Mario (N64) *
20. The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (SNES) *
21. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX (GBC) *
22. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages (GBC) *
23. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons (GBC) *
24. Yoshi's Island (SNES) *
25. Super Mario World (SNES) *
26. Super Mario RPG (SFC) *
27. Kaeru No Tame Ni Kane Wa Naru (GB)
28. Final Fantasy VI (SFC) *
29. Final Fantasy IV (SFC) *
30. Final Fantasy V (SFC)
31. Final Fantasy III (Famicom)
32. Mother 2 (SFC) *
33. Mother 3 (GBA) *
34. Hebereke (Famicom)
35. Donkey Kong Country 2 (SFC)
36. Donkey Kong Country 3 (SFC)
37. Donkey Kong Country (SFC) *
38. Wario's Woods (Famicom)
39. Paper Mario: Color Splash (Wii U)
40. Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam (3DS)
41. Luigi's Mansion (3DS) *
42. Paper Mario: Sticker Star (3DS)
43. Mario & Luigi Superstar Saga & Bowser's Minions (3DS)
44. Mario & Luigi: Bowser's Inside Story & Bowser Jr's Journey (3DS)
45. Tomato Adventure (GBA)
46. Corpse Party (PSP)
47. Rave Master: Fighting Live (GC)
48. Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow (GBA) *
49. Castlevania: Circle of the Moon (GBA)
50. Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance (GBA) *
51. New Super Mario Bros. 2 (3DS)
52. The Outer Worlds (Xbone)
53. Momodora: Reverie Under the Moonlight (Xbone)
54. Guacamelee 2 (Xbone)
55. Steamworld Dig 2 (Xbone)
56. Yoku's Island Express (Xbone)
57. Guacamelee (Xbone) *
58. Blazing Chrome (Xbone)
59. Minit (Xbone)
60. Dishonored 2 (Xbone)
61. Deus Ex: Mankind Divided (Xbone)
62. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night (Xbone)
63. Recore: Definitive Edition (Xbone)
64. Ori and the Blind Forest: Definitive Edition (Xbone)
65. Super Lucky's Tale (Xbone)
66. Snake Pass (Xbone)
67. My Friend Pedro - Blood Bullets Bananas (Xbone)
68. Kirby 64: Legend of the Crystal Shards (N64) *

69. Kirby's Adventure (NES)

I was in the mood for some more Kirby after finishing Kirby 64, and then I remembered Kirby's Adventure on my NES Classic! It's one of the very few mainline Kirby games I haven't yet beaten (and I think may actually be the last I hadn't beaten), so I thought why not give it a try. I remembered it controlling not so hot the last time I tried it, but I figured that must've just been the mood I was in at the time. I proved to myself it was in fact not the mood I was in at the time, and I didn't really enjoy my time with this game when all was said and done. I'm glad to have the entire mainline Kirby series under my belt now, I suppose, but the 3 hours of this game aren't really ones I'll look back on super fondly compared to the many many hours I spent with the GBA version of this game as a kid.

It's Kirby in his first adventure where he could gain powers and not just suck things up and spit them out. It's a pretty groundbreaking entry for the series, considering the copy ability is one of the things Kirby is best known for these days. There are a good handful of powers, at least on paper, as many of them have very similar or nearly identical effects but different cosmetics. You go through 7 worlds with 7 bosses to eventually fight Nightmare in a special final two-stage boss fight.

The level design is alright, even if some levels end up feeling a little short in retrospect. You get to them via a series of hub areas for each world that has both doors to the stages but also doors to mini-games you can play for extra lives, mini-boss arenas you can do for a maxim tomato, or a gallery area where you can get a certain power for free whenever you want. Many of the levels have secret switches hidden in them that will unlock more of these special bonus areas in the hub maps, but some of these switches are SUPER hard to find and are behind nearly or entirely invisible doors. 100%-ing this game without a guide is no easy feat, and I definitely couldn't've done it in 3 hours if I hadn't remembered basically all of them, at least in part, from all my time with this as a kid.

My biggest issues with the game are largely mechanical. First off, while the game is very pretty for a NES game, it also means there's a LOT of slowdown, particularly when there are a lot of enemies on screen at once. Next, Kirby has a lot more heft to him than he does in later games, and even compared to Kirby's Dream Land 1 and 2 (the games before and after this one), it feels like it takes him way longer to recover from hits, falls, etc. before he can jump or use a power again. On top of that, while you press B to use your powers and A to jump, A very critically does not fly. Pressing Up on the D-pad flies, and while this is certainly partly my fault for having the muscle memory that later Kirby games have given me, there were a ton of times where I wanted to fly but couldn't, or accidentally started flying when I didn't want to because of a stray command on the D-pad. Lastly, it's always just one hit (instead of how it's almost always several in later games) before you lose your power. The end experience wasn't often very challenging, but it was very often frustrating due to some combination of the above issues.

The presentation is nice, as you'd hope a NES game from 1993 would be. Although it does add to the aforementioned slow down, the environments have lots of colors, enemies and Kirby have a lot of animations. The color pallet swaps from stage to stage do a good job of coming off more as stylistic choices instead of hardware necessities. The enemy designs would go on to be reused to countless Kirby games for a good reason: They're really solid and memorable ones, especially the bosses (even though a lot of these guys are lifted from Kirby's Dream Land themselves). The same thing goes for the music, which is as iconic as anything else in this game when it comes to Kirby.

Verdict: Not Recommended. I did not enjoy enough of my time with this game that I can't recommend it without tons of caveats. The experience of Kirby has been improved and tightened up so significantly since this, his second outing, that the barrier to entry is already weirdly high for a Kirby game (having to relearn how to Kirby) even if the slowdown issues weren't a problem on top of that. It's an important stepping stone for a series I love, but this is definitely my least favorite among all the mainline Kirby games.
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dsheinem
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by dsheinem Thu Dec 26, 2019 11:16 am

Games Beaten 2019

Kentucky Route Zero Act 1 - PC
All Our Asias - PC
Shape of the World - Switch
Hidden Folks - PC
Hyrule Warriors - Wii U
Onrush - PS4
Assassin's Creed Origins - X1
Virtua Fighter 5: Final Showdown -360
Metro Exodus - PS4
Split/Second - 360
Far Cry: New Dawn - PS4
Bloodstained: Curse of the Moon - X1
Marvel vs Capcom Infinite - PS4
Rage - PC
Red Faction: Armageddon - 360
Momonga Pinball Adventure - Switch
Psycho Soldier - Vita (Arcade)
Super Mutant Alien Assault - Vita
Burly Men at Sea - Vita
Sigil - PC
Fat Princess - PS3
Borderlands 2: Commander Lilith and the Fight for Sanctuary - PC
Monster World IV - Genesis (PS3)
Marvel's Spider-Man - PS4
Mega Man X4 - Switch
Armored Warriors - Switch (Arcade)
Battle Circuit - Switch (Arcade)
Borderlands 3 - PS4
Hyper Dyne Side Arms - PS3(Arcade)
Legendary Wings - PS3 (Arcade)
The Outer Worlds - X1
Akai Katana - 360
RayStorm - PS2 (Arcade)
Operation C - PS4 (Game Boy)
Kid Dracula - Switch (Famicom)
Castlevania: The Adventure - Switch (Game Boy)
Castlevania II: Belmont's Revenge - Switch (Game Boy)
What the Golf - iOS
Ninjin: Clash of Carrots - PS4
tint. - iOS *new*

Total: 40


Previously: 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010


This is a relaxing/creative puzzle game where you have to use watercolors to unlock origami. I played through the original game (they have since added more "books"/levels which I hope to get back to at some point), so up it goes on the list. If you have Apple Arcade, you should check it out - you'll know in the first minute or so if you like this kind of puzzle game or not.

I have a small hope of making it to 45 this year, but we shall see...
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by MrPopo Thu Dec 26, 2019 3:35 pm

First 50:
1. Octopath Traveler - Switch
2. Dusk - PC
3. Forsaken Remastered - PC
4. Tales of Eternia - PS1
5. Resident Evil 2 (2019) - PC
6. Pokémon Trading Card Game - GBC
7. Metro Exodus - PC
8. Thronebreaker: The Witcher Tales - PC
9. Project Warlock - PC
10. Magic: The Gathering - PC
11. Ghost 1.0 - PC
12. Call of Duty 2 - PC
13. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice - PS4
14. Revelations: The Demon Slayer - GBC
15. Mechstermination Force - Switch
16. Shadow Warrior Classic Redux - PC
17. Lost Sphear - Switch
18. Warcraft II: Beyond the Dark Portal - PC
19. Dragon Quest III - NES
20. Rage 2 - PC
21. Blood - PC
22. Harvest Moon 64 - N64
23. Battlefield V - PC
24. Sigil - PC
25. Shining Force III: Scenario 2 - Saturn
26. Shining Force III: Scenario 3 - Saturn
27. Borderlands 2: Commander Lillith and the Fight for Sanctuary - PC
28. Gato Roboto - Switch
29. Timespinner - Switch
30. Amid Evil - PC
31. Pillars of Eternity II: Beast of Winter - PC
32. Pillars of Eternity II: Seeker, Slayer, Survivor - PC
33. Pillars of Eternity II: The Forgotten Sanctum - PC
34. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night - Switch
35. Orphan - PC
36. Project Nimbus - PC
37. Hardcore Mecha - PC
38. Grey Goo - PC
39. Giants: Citizen Kabuto - PC
40. Wolfenstein: Youngblood - PC
41. Fire Emblem: Three Houses - Switch
42. Metal Wolf Chaos XD - PC
43. Ion Fury - PC
44. Final Fantasy Adventure - GB
45. Astral Chain - Switch
46. Rebel Galaxy Outlaw - PC
47. Blasphemous - Switch
48. Daemon x Machina - Switch
49. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening - Switch
50. Borderlands 3 - PC

51. Valfaris - Switch
52. Unreal: Return to Na Pali - PC
53. The Outer Worlds - PC
54. MechWarrior 4: Black Knight - PC
55. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare - PC
56. Deus Ex: Mankind Divided: System Rift - PC
57. MDK - PC
58. Pokémon Sword - Switch
59. Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order - PC
60. Blazing Chrome - Switch
61. MDK 2 - PC
62. Heavy Gear - PC
63. Virtual-On - Saturn
64. Virtual-On: Oratorio Tangram - DC
65. MechWarrior 5: Mercenaries - PC
66. Metaltech: Earthsiege - PC
67. Earthsiege 2 - PC
68. Cthulhu Saves Christmas - PC
69. Starsiege - PC
70. Hedon - PC

Hedon is a new FPS built using GZDoom as its engine that takes a lot of inspiration from Hexen when it comes to its level design. It's a pretty solid Doom-engine game with good weapon variety and no real bullshit enemies, though it does have some rough edges. And it ends on a major cliffhanger, basically, the ending is like the ending of Empire Strikes Back in terms of "there is OBVIOUSLY more to come and the main conflict has not been resolved."

The basic premise is that you are a half-orc half-demon woman who is involved in her orc tribe's invasion of Hell to fight back the demons, but then something happens, she gets knocked out, and wakes up in the ice caves close to her home. With no memory of what happened she needs to make her way back to town, where she discovers that everything has been overrun by a vile cult and her sisters are dead (it's an Amazon orc tribe, just roll with it). The solution to this is murder.

The game levels are quite large and intricate, with care taken to make them feel like real places (akin to what Duke 3D did). In addition to your standard key hunt every level also has some sort of key item hunt where you need to put together SOMETHING that lets you progress; this adds some variety to your tasks, even if it's basically the same thing as a key and switch hunt. One thing the game does is give you a period at the start of the level where you just explore, without any hostiles. This helps you digest the aesthetics of the level before you switch into murder mode. The whole level design is quite reminiscent of what they did in Hexen, and the levels are about the same size (though without being split into a bunch of sub maps with varying aesthetics). So the ten levels each take between half an hour and an hour to complete. The levels also have a bunch of readable notes hanging around which help tell the story.

On the weapon side you have a pretty good selection. An axe, automatic rifle, a shotgun, a crossbow that fires explosive bolts, two kinds of grenade launcher ammos, and a spear that shoots hitscan bolts that are high damage. Each of these also has an alternate fire mode, though only about half of the alt fires are useful. The game also has a melee-only difficulty that completely replaces the ranged weapons with melee weapons and has enemies drop healing potions instead of ammo. Each weapon is good against some selection of the enemies, and you'll be constantly switching things up to both balance ammo consumption and to deal with what is thrown at you.

There are a few rough edges. The game takes advantage of the jump button added to basically every Doom source port to add in jumping sections which are very hit and miss. It's especially bad when you're platforming over lava or pits. The game also has a very mixed aesthetic; while the terrain is your standard Doom engine low-res textures all the sprites are a much higher resolution which makes them stand out in an unflattering way. The art for the sprites is competently drawn; it's basically the dev's DeviantArt made into a video game with pixel size limitations, so it can only be so good. Finally, and this is mostly a personal pet peeve of mine, there are sections where the game goes for the "let's just keep spawning shit for minutes on end" arena to punctuate certain moments. It's an excuse to wear the player down through cheap damage and the obvious ammo use.

On the whole it's a very solid retro FPS experience. If you're a fan of old FPSs this is another worthy addition to go with the general bounty we've gotten over the last couple years.
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Games Beaten: 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
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PartridgeSenpai
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by PartridgeSenpai Thu Dec 26, 2019 5:36 pm

Partridge Senpai's 2019 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018
* indicates a repeat

1. Night Slashers (Switch)
2. Bye-Bye BOXBOY! (3DS)
3. GTA4: The Ballad of Gay Tony (Xbox 360)
4. Katamari Forever (PS3)
5. Detention (PS4)
6. Donkey Kong 64 (N64) *
7. OctoDad: Dadliest Catch (PS4) *
8. FlintHook (Switch)
9. God of War (PS4)
10. God of War HD (PS3)
11. Tiny Barbarian DX (Switch)
12. God of War 2 HD (PS3)
13. Starlink (Switch)
14. Shin Gundam Musou (PS3)
15. Battle & Get! Pokemon Typing DS (DS)
16. Banjo-Kazooie (N64) *
17. Super Mario 64: Rumble Edition (N64)
18. Mario Party 3 (N64) *
19. Paper Mario (N64) *
20. The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (SNES) *
21. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX (GBC) *
22. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages (GBC) *
23. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons (GBC) *
24. Yoshi's Island (SNES) *
25. Super Mario World (SNES) *
26. Super Mario RPG (SFC) *
27. Kaeru No Tame Ni Kane Wa Naru (GB)
28. Final Fantasy VI (SFC) *
29. Final Fantasy IV (SFC) *
30. Final Fantasy V (SFC)
31. Final Fantasy III (Famicom)
32. Mother 2 (SFC) *
33. Mother 3 (GBA) *
34. Hebereke (Famicom)
35. Donkey Kong Country 2 (SFC)
36. Donkey Kong Country 3 (SFC)
37. Donkey Kong Country (SFC) *
38. Wario's Woods (Famicom)
39. Paper Mario: Color Splash (Wii U)
40. Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam (3DS)
41. Luigi's Mansion (3DS) *
42. Paper Mario: Sticker Star (3DS)
43. Mario & Luigi Superstar Saga & Bowser's Minions (3DS)
44. Mario & Luigi: Bowser's Inside Story & Bowser Jr's Journey (3DS)
45. Tomato Adventure (GBA)
46. Corpse Party (PSP)
47. Rave Master: Fighting Live (GC)
48. Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow (GBA) *
49. Castlevania: Circle of the Moon (GBA)
50. Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance (GBA) *
51. New Super Mario Bros. 2 (3DS)
52. The Outer Worlds (Xbone)
53. Momodora: Reverie Under the Moonlight (Xbone)
54. Guacamelee 2 (Xbone)
55. Steamworld Dig 2 (Xbone)
56. Yoku's Island Express (Xbone)
57. Guacamelee (Xbone) *
58. Blazing Chrome (Xbone)
59. Minit (Xbone)
60. Dishonored 2 (Xbone)
61. Deus Ex: Mankind Divided (Xbone)
62. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night (Xbone)
63. Recore: Definitive Edition (Xbone)
64. Ori and the Blind Forest: Definitive Edition (Xbone)
65. Super Lucky's Tale (Xbone)
66. Snake Pass (Xbone)
67. My Friend Pedro - Blood Bullets Bananas (Xbone)
68. Kirby 64: Legend of the Crystal Shards (N64) *
69. Kirby's Adventure (NES)

70. Super Metroid (SNES) *

I still had the Classic consoles hooked up, and I've still got the Metroidvania itch deep in my soul (and I think I always will X3). It's been a looooong time since I've played Super Metroid, so I thought I'd give it a replay. Considering how long its been, Super Metroid is a game kinda amazingly ahead of its time in a lot of respects, and still holds up as one of the all-time greats of the genre (although Zero Mission is still my favorite Metroid game). I seem to recall my last attempt through this game having a similar completion percentage (74% this time), but a longer playtime (5 hours, 19 minutes). Either way, I really enjoyed my time with it ^w^

Y'all don't need me to tell you that Super Metroid is great. Y'all know it controls really well, has great graphics, atmospheric music, the works. It's an exemplary 16-bit game and one of the best games on the SNES, easily. So instead of going on about that, I'll talk more specifically about what surprised me about what the game has (or doesn't) under the hood for a game in 1994.

What first surprised me big time is something unprecedented for even modern Nintendo games: Rebindable buttons! You can rebind ANY of the face buttons (other than movement) from the title screen when you pick your save file. Something right off the bat that let me enjoy the game WAY more than I otherwise would've because I didn't need to relearn a control scheme all of a sudden. The other really cool bit is a language selection! I can't think of many other SNES games have have an option for English or Japanese text right from the get-go! Beyond that, lots of the design aspects of the game, whether on purpose or not (it feels purposeful), the levels of fuckery they allow you to commit in this game because of how certain powers work, especially the wall jump and the bomb jump, that allow you to sequence break like HECK almost immediately XD. I made some bad choices and managed to have to fight (and win against! ^w^) Kraid without the Spazer or the Hi-Jump powerups. Lucky for me this was the playthrough I FINALLY sussed out exactly how the wall jump works XD

However, parts of the game definitely do make it show its age in ways I didn't remember. Having an auto-completing map in 1994 is freaking awesome and helps the game IMMENSELY, Buttttt going back to play it in 2019, it's really apparent that the map showing entrances to rooms, and not just their location in relation to one another, would've really helped exploration. This adds to the larger problem of the signposting in the game being kinda bad. You can't make marks on your map, objective markers are absolutely not a thing, and you can't see the map of any area but the one you're in. Even though I've beaten the game before, and I was playing it all in one session, I still managed to get lost and forget where I was supposed to go to progress the main game (I found a lot of neat stuff exploring, but beyond that I also did a lot of ultimately pointless wandering hunting for the gravity suit XP).

There are also some mechanical aspects to the game that feel a little unnecessary or not as fleshed out as they needed to be. The grapple hook is a neat stop-gap in platforming aids between the hi-jump and the gravity jump, but it always felt awkward to use and not very fun for me. Power bombs are a neat idea for screen clearing, but most of the nastier enemies you'd want a screen-clear for are so mobile (or otherwise immune to the power bomb) that it feels like something only put in to gate progress arbitrarily. It's hard to hold much of what the game doesn't get 100% perfect against it, considering that it's still an incredible accomplishment for 1994 (and the Casltevania games honestly wouldn't get this good until at least Aria of Sorrow), but it's stuff I couldn't help but notice in 2019 and felt are at least worth mentioning here.

Verdict: Highly Recommended. Like I said before, we all know the game is great. This was a neat jaunt for me back to one of the first games I picked up on the Wii Virtual Console. It still holds up really well and has some really incredible accessibility features for a console game in 1994. Modern Nintendo could lean a thing or two about rebindable buttons from R&D1 back in 1994, I can tell ya that much for free XD
I identify everyone via avatar, so if you change your avatar, I genuinely might completely forget who you are. -- Me
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pierrot
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by pierrot Thu Dec 26, 2019 10:40 pm

Games Beaten List:

  1. Tiny Toon Adventures: Buster's Hidden Treasure (GEN)
  2. The Revenge of Shinobi (GEN)
  3. Shadow Dancer: The Secret of Shinobi (GEN)
  4. Shinobi III: Return of the Ninja Master (GEN)
  5. Go Go Ackman (SFC)
  6. Super Wagyan Land (SFC)
  7. Super Mario RPG (SFC)
  8. Shin Megami Tensei if... (SFC)
  9. Front Mission: Gun Hazard (SFC)
  10. Steep Slope Sliders (SAT)
  11. Valkyrie Profile (PS1)
  12. Sakura Taisen (SAT)
  13. Shenmue Chapter 1: Yokosuka (DC)
  14. Shinobi (PS2)
  15. Gungrave (PS2)
  16. Assault Suit Leynos 2 (SAT)
  17. Sakura Taisen 2: Kimi, Shinitamoukoto Nakare (SAT)
  18. Kino no Tabi: The Beautiful World (PS2)
  19. Ganbare Goemon! Karakuri Douchuu (FC)
  20. Ganbare Goemon 2 (FC)
  21. Sakura Taisen 3 ~Paris wa Moeteiru ka~ (DC)
  22. Capcom vs SNK: Millennium Fight 2000 (DC)
  23. Capcom vs SNK: Millennium Fight 2000 Pro (DC)
  24. Capcom vs SNK 2: Millionaire Fighting 2001 (DC)
  25. Sakura Taisen 4 ~Koi-seyo Otome~ (DC)
  26. Street Fighter Zero 3: Saikyou-ryuu Doujou (DC)
  27. King of Fighters '99 Evolution (DC)
  28. Madou Monogatari I (MD)
  29. Twinkle Star Sprites (SAT)
  30. Madou Monogatari (SAT)
  31. Policenauts (SAT)
  32. Demon's Blazon: Makaimura Monshou-hen (SFC)
  33. Akumajou Special: Boku Dracula-kun (FC)
  34. Akumajou Special: Boku Dracula-kun (GB)
  35. Red Arimer: Makaimura Gaiden (GB)
  36. Getsu Fuumaden (FC)
  37. After Armageddon Gaiden: Majuu Toushouden Eclipse (Mega CD)
  38. Zelda II: The Adventure of Link (NES)
  39. Elnard (SFC)
  40. Actraiser (SFC)
  41. Sonic Mania (PC)
  42. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night (PC)
  43. Blazing Chrome (PC)
  44. ReCore - Definitive Edition (PC)
  45. The Outer Worlds (PC)
  46. Shenmue II (DC)
  47. Shenmue III (PC)
  48. Timespinner (PC)
  49. Ori and the Blind Forest - Definitive Edition (PC)
  50. Super Lucky's Tale (PC)

Timespinner - This is a really forgettable game, but in kind of an odd way. I hated quite a bit about this game, but it only took a couple days after finishing it for me to almost completely forget most of what I had played. It's not good though. I am willing to acknowledge that it's potentially a little better than I would give it credit for, because I really never allowed it to elevate past its absolutely atrocious first impression, but it's not good, either way. For one thing, the rendered game window is bordered in this extremely bizarre fashion. It's less noticeable with the decorative right/left boarder setting, but there's always black boarders on the top and bottom, with no way to fill the screen in the settings. The really obnoxious thing is that the game just starts off like an unironic "No Time to Explain," and the story feels too much like Freedom Planet's, with the added nut-punch of being forced to actually watch it. I'm not going to sugar coat it, the story is basement-level shit, and even the writers can't keep track of their own nonsense, as evidenced by one of the things the main character does in one of the endings making no sense, since she's erased from her timeline after using the timespinner. It's all just ad-hoc story telling, with no real goal anyway, though. The only thing worse than the story is the characters; Oh my god, what sock-puppets they are. The main character's arc is just plainly poor. You learn about her mother through a bunch of memories, and it's just not worth it because she's a pretty shitty person, like her daughter. The narrative wants to do a billion things all at once, and never follows through on any of them. It's a clusterfuck of hot garbage. I don't know if there's anything that better exemplifies how forced everything feels. narratively, than the currency in the game being "entropy," and that it's accepted by a crow that collects shiny rocks, and a quartermaster 1000 years in the past.

This is something of a spoiler, but I usually roll my eyes when people complain about "agendas" online; unfortunately the forced nature of the writing extends to the sidequests, and the characters who give those sidequests. The main "reward" for these sidequests is being clued in to the fact that they are all queer people. Normally that might be something to celebrate, but it's done in such an awkward way, that basically feels like watching an HR video on how to respond to queer coworkers, that I honestly kind of agree with people who complain about it demonstrating an agenda. Because it basically does. It's awkward, stilted, irrelevant, and ultimately serves no purpose within the game other than forcing a couple of love scenarios that aren't even really believable. They just seem coincidental and forced, and the main one doesn't really make much sense upon inspection. Anyway, just don't go inspecting the story. It's insufferably amateurish, and not worth anyone's time. If I were acting as a consultant for the developers, I would tell them to make an "arcade" mode that removes the story, like Freedom Planet. If you, somehow, liked the story in Freedom Planet (I'm not trying to judge), then Timespinners' story might be for you. It made the game borderline unplayable for me.

In terms of gameplay, it's pretty all right. I honestly don't care about it one way or the other. It's just really clear that it doesn't have any of its own ideas, and basically just steals everything from better games. It has that typical kind of RPG Maker look, which I don't particularly care fore, but can't really knock either. I will say that I thought the enemies were pretty much uninteresting, or just kind of bad. The map is also pretty underwhelming, because most of it is just repeated over two different time periods, without even a lot of difference. All told, I thought it was decent, at best, but with some serious caveats. I would highly recommend looking elsewhere for a metroidvania fix. This one skews toward the Castlevania side of the spectrum, so if that's your bag, just play SOTN. Hell, play ROTN. Unless you have absolutely nothing else to turn to, just don't bother with Timespinner.

I guess once I got going, I was able to remember a bit about it, but I'm probably going to forget about it again pretty quickly.


Ori - Ori was really great. In stark contrast to Timespinner, Ori gives such an amazing first impression, and has a truly amazing soundtrack. The story is also very clearly thought out, and not forced or pretentious, like some other games. Ori is a bit more like a Metroid game in terms of gameplay, and has a pretty nice path through the map. However, while first impressions are off the charts with Ori, I was a little less enthusiastic about it toward the middle of the game, because some of the earlier skill acquisitions just feel a little weird, particularly stuff like the climb ability, and I wasn't really a fan of the bash technique (I think that's what it was called, where Ori can redirect projectiles, and launch itself in different directions with them). Early on while I was playing the game I was thinking, 'wow, this seems a lot like one of the newer Rayman games,' and, at least according to the wikipedia page, it was supposedly influenced by those games. I think it's a visually interesting game, and for the most part I thought the art style was nice, but I wouldn't say it's really my preference. I feel like neon is the main contribution of this generation of games to the greater pantheon of gaming, and I would say that's not a great legacy.

Anyway, I actually ended up finishing 100% of the map on normal, with the skill tree completed. I really loved Naru, and enjoyed the area that was apparently added for the definitive version of the game. I will say that I can't imagine playing this game without the warps, because even with them being added to the definitive version, it still felt like they were in less than ideal locations. This is a recent metroidvania that actually adds some value to the formula, like Guacamelee. It will also jerk the tears out of your face, so I'd recommend it over the more derivative fare out there.


Super Lucky's Tale - I don't have a lot to say about Super Lucky's Tale. It's all right. The characters are cute, and I enjoyed the wormles and their stupid voices quite a bit. The somewhat fixed camera can be a bit of a nuisance, but the platforming is generally decent, aside from being extremely easy. Sometimes I wasn't quite sure if it was really a game intended for very young kids or not. Generally it seems like it's for the five to ten age range, but then there's the final boss (which was weirdly abrupt) who kind of caught me off guard by actually being somewhat challenging. I didn't actually bother playing all the stages since I was able to get to trinket totals that let me take on the bosses before even going to a couple of the stages in a given world. I finished with 74 charms out of 117, I think. I actually got a lot of those charms from doing the puzzle challenges, though. That was kind of more fun for me than the rest of the game. Honestly, I don't really enjoy the collectathon style of 3D platformers (even though I can be pretty obsessive about collecting things in games), and feel like that's the worst side effect of Mario 64's existence. It's just not a very inventive, or inspired gameplay loop, and fills the gaps with a fair amount of repetitiveness. In that respect, I think it's kind of a boon that Super Lucky's Tale doesn't have all that many levels in the base game (which is all I seem to have access to with the Game Pass version), and generally it only takes one pass through them to collect all four of the clovers in each stage.

When it comes down to it, you can chuck the story out the window, because it doesn't even matter, but it's a cute game, that plays fairly well. The experience is a bit on the dull side, though. Also, I don't understand how they thought it was all right to put such exploitative prices on the unlockable outfits.
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PartridgeSenpai
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by PartridgeSenpai Fri Dec 27, 2019 3:44 am

Partridge Senpai's 2019 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018
* indicates a repeat

1. Night Slashers (Switch)
2. Bye-Bye BOXBOY! (3DS)
3. GTA4: The Ballad of Gay Tony (Xbox 360)
4. Katamari Forever (PS3)
5. Detention (PS4)
6. Donkey Kong 64 (N64) *
7. OctoDad: Dadliest Catch (PS4) *
8. FlintHook (Switch)
9. God of War (PS4)
10. God of War HD (PS3)
11. Tiny Barbarian DX (Switch)
12. God of War 2 HD (PS3)
13. Starlink (Switch)
14. Shin Gundam Musou (PS3)
15. Battle & Get! Pokemon Typing DS (DS)
16. Banjo-Kazooie (N64) *
17. Super Mario 64: Rumble Edition (N64)
18. Mario Party 3 (N64) *
19. Paper Mario (N64) *
20. The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (SNES) *
21. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX (GBC) *
22. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages (GBC) *
23. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons (GBC) *
24. Yoshi's Island (SNES) *
25. Super Mario World (SNES) *
26. Super Mario RPG (SFC) *
27. Kaeru No Tame Ni Kane Wa Naru (GB)
28. Final Fantasy VI (SFC) *
29. Final Fantasy IV (SFC) *
30. Final Fantasy V (SFC)
31. Final Fantasy III (Famicom)
32. Mother 2 (SFC) *
33. Mother 3 (GBA) *
34. Hebereke (Famicom)
35. Donkey Kong Country 2 (SFC)
36. Donkey Kong Country 3 (SFC)
37. Donkey Kong Country (SFC) *
38. Wario's Woods (Famicom)
39. Paper Mario: Color Splash (Wii U)
40. Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam (3DS)
41. Luigi's Mansion (3DS) *
42. Paper Mario: Sticker Star (3DS)
43. Mario & Luigi Superstar Saga & Bowser's Minions (3DS)
44. Mario & Luigi: Bowser's Inside Story & Bowser Jr's Journey (3DS)
45. Tomato Adventure (GBA)
46. Corpse Party (PSP)
47. Rave Master: Fighting Live (GC)
48. Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow (GBA) *
49. Castlevania: Circle of the Moon (GBA)
50. Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance (GBA) *
51. New Super Mario Bros. 2 (3DS)
52. The Outer Worlds (Xbone)
53. Momodora: Reverie Under the Moonlight (Xbone)
54. Guacamelee 2 (Xbone)
55. Steamworld Dig 2 (Xbone)
56. Yoku's Island Express (Xbone)
57. Guacamelee (Xbone) *
58. Blazing Chrome (Xbone)
59. Minit (Xbone)
60. Dishonored 2 (Xbone)
61. Deus Ex: Mankind Divided (Xbone)
62. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night (Xbone)
63. Recore: Definitive Edition (Xbone)
64. Ori and the Blind Forest: Definitive Edition (Xbone)
65. Super Lucky's Tale (Xbone)
66. Snake Pass (Xbone)
67. My Friend Pedro - Blood Bullets Bananas (Xbone)
68. Kirby 64: Legend of the Crystal Shards (N64) *
69. Kirby's Adventure (NES)
70. Super Metroid (SNES) *

71. Metroid Fusion (GBA) *

Still very much in the mood for a walk down Metroid memory lane, I played through Metroid Fusion on my 3DS today. Metroid Fusion was a game I got way later than Zero Mission or Super Metroid. I didn't even know it existed until I happened upon used it in a Gamestop in the early 2010's. Out of the three, it's one I definitely remembered the least about despite having beaten it before. Gunstar was talking in Slack about how it's one of his favorites out of the bunch, so I thought it would be a perfect thing to play through today. My completion time was 3 hours and 50 minutes with a 71% item completion rate.

Compared to other Metroid games (at least at the time), Metroid Fusion has a lot of text and story. On a mission to SR388 (home planet of the now extinct Metroids), Samus is infected by a mysterious life form they later call X. X is basically The Thing (from the titular film), and can consume its host and take its form and memories. Their natural predators were the Metroids, but now that those are extinct, they're free to multiply like crazy on SR388. Samus nearly dies, but is saved by a cure made from a culture taken from the last Metroid when it had been in captivity. Now that Metroids are literally a part of her, she can absorb X organisms harmlessly (and these organisms are your new weapon and health pickups). There's an explosion at the center that treated her, and she is sent back to inspect it and try and solve whatever problem may have arisen. And that is JUST the opening cutscene. From there, the story largely takes the form of your little objective briefings from the AI in Samus' new ship (the old one drifted into an asteroid belt and blew up when she got first infected and fell unconscious) as well as little internal monologues Samus will have with herself between large objectives.

If Metroid HAD to have a story with some kind of arc, I think the direction they're trying to take this in is probably one of the better ones they could've taken it. The execution falls soooo flat though. The only time any drama or literal dialogue between Samus and her computer really start happening is in the last little bit of the game, and that is when the game decides to make all of its big reveals and character growth moments and such. It's a ton of "tell not show" that ultimately really comes off flat. It's a nice narrative excuse to give you objective markers (to help solve some of Super Metroid's signposting problems), and it probably would've been fine if they hadn't tried for the big dramatic moments and left it as just something to bring a little levity to the story. But as it is, it's somewhere between a net-neutral addition and a bit of an overall drag as the objective briefings (which cannot be skipped) overstay their welcomes and drag down the pacing.

This is a 2D Metroid game, so of course it's Samus going around, collecting suit upgrades both optional and necessary, and fighting big boss battles with your arm beam & missiles. There have been a lot of really smart simplifications made to the Super Metroid formula to get Metroid onto a platform with 4 buttons instead of 6, though, and I would say on the whole this game plays a lot better than Super Metroid. Samus moves quickly, turns quickly, and has a real consistency to her movement so you're never second-guessing if the weird terrain you're in or around will interrupt her current movements. Instead of being a separate power up, super missiles are just an upgrade for your normal missiles that just makes them stronger, and you just hold R to use them or your power bombs instead of pressing select to toggle through a bunch of them. A lot of the mechanical fluff and stumbles that didn't quite work in Super Metroid has been stripped out and it's for the better, as all the platforming and action feel way more fluid and fun to play. This game is also a fair bit harder, as while bosses aren't super difficult, normal enemies hit REALLY hard and can run down your HP really quick. It's well worth hunting down energy tank expansions for more health, because otherwise you're probably going to be dying a lot if you aren't careful.

However, not all changes are positive, and most of the issues I had with the game come from the new narrative conceits and tightening up of the signposting. X organisms being your new health and item powerups is neat in a narrative standpoint, but that does a lot to add to the game's difficulty. You only get one power up from an enemy at a time, and the most health you can get from one enemy is 10. Most enemies can deal far more than that with just one hit, and there aren't scads and scads of enemies to farm through, so if you're getting hit by even 1 in 5 enemy encounters, you very well might be taking net-negative HP damage. This is compounded by the fact that enemies revert into X organisms when they "die", they don't disappear into a powerup. That little flying blob will fly around and often try and run away from you, and it'll turn into a NEW enemy to fight if you don't snag it fast enough (with some enemy spawns being scripted to turn immediately into a new enemy and being impossible to grab to prevent that).

Additionally, there are tons of objective markers as you progress through the story, and the orbital research facility the game takes place in is divided into a hub with 6 sections. The ultimate execution of this is that the game is very linear compared to Super Metroid or Zero Mission, with almost no sequence breaking possible in it. Wall jumping has been made a lot easier, but easier to the point that it's almost expected, and the world is designed so that you won't be progressing any more than a little bit ahead of where you are if you use it. Bomb jumping has also been removed, so you can no longer defy vertical passageways right off the bat. These two things aren't really negative issues as such, but they make the game feel significantly different than the other two post-8-bit Metroid titles. It makes it feel like this has a lot more in common with the Metroid-y Casltevanias on GBA coming out around this time (although I'd say Fusion is far better than either of the two that had come out by this point). Higher difficulty and more linearity aren't inherently bad things, but it's different in a way that's worth mentioning.

Verdict: Highly Recommended. Differences from the series and narrative issues aside, this is still a fantastic Metroid game. I'd put it on equal footing with Super Metroid, personally. Overall, I got the feeling from this game that in 2002, Nintendo really had no idea what they were going to do with Metroid. The perfect representation of this comes near the end of the game when you fight Ridley. You see him in his Super Metroid sprite, but then it morphs into a new sprite much more reminiscent of how he looks in Metroid Prime (which came out right alongside this back then). From the far more linear gameplay to the fairly lukewarm narrative, Nintendo was really testing out the waters to see what Metroid could be. Had this game had a little more nonlinearity or a better narrative, I think it could've seen the success that its sister game Metroid Prime found, but that was not the case. That said, It's still a great Metroidvania well worth your time, even if it is a little on the short side.
I identify everyone via avatar, so if you change your avatar, I genuinely might completely forget who you are. -- Me
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