Anything that is gaming related that doesn't fit well anywhere else
User avatar
dsheinem
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 23151
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 12:56 pm
Location: Northeast Pennsylvania

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by dsheinem Sat Dec 21, 2019 2:56 pm

Games Beaten 2019

Kentucky Route Zero Act 1 - PC
All Our Asias - PC
Shape of the World - Switch
Hidden Folks - PC
Hyrule Warriors - Wii U
Onrush - PS4
Assassin's Creed Origins - X1
Virtua Fighter 5: Final Showdown -360
Metro Exodus - PS4
Split/Second - 360
Far Cry: New Dawn - PS4
Bloodstained: Curse of the Moon - X1
Marvel vs Capcom Infinite - PS4
Rage - PC
Red Faction: Armageddon - 360
Momonga Pinball Adventure - Switch
Psycho Soldier - Vita (Arcade)
Super Mutant Alien Assault - Vita
Burly Men at Sea - Vita
Sigil - PC
Fat Princess - PS3
Borderlands 2: Commander Lilith and the Fight for Sanctuary - PC
Monster World IV - Genesis (PS3)
Marvel's Spider-Man - PS4
Mega Man X4 - Switch
Armored Warriors - Switch (Arcade)
Battle Circuit - Switch (Arcade)
Borderlands 3 - PS4
Hyper Dyne Side Arms - PS3(Arcade)
Legendary Wings - PS3 (Arcade)
The Outer Worlds - X1
Akai Katana - 360
RayStorm - PS2 (Arcade)
Operation C - PS4 (Game Boy)
Kid Dracula - Switch (Famicom)
Castlevania: The Adventure - Switch (Game Boy)
Castlevania II: Belmont's Revenge - Switch (Game Boy)
What the Golf - iOS
Ninjin: Clash of Carrots - PS4 *new*

Total: 39


Previously: 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010

This is arguably the best .99 I’ve spent on the PSN. This is an exceedingly fun game - a compelling combo of a hack-n-slash crossed with a runner...imagine a Bit-trip Runner game focused on combat instead of platforming...with a charming cast of characters and better-than-servicable plot, lots of gear and perk upgrades, etc. A really fantastic surprise that I would recommend to anyone who likes fast-paced arcade-style gameplay.
User avatar
MrPopo
Moderator
 
Posts: 23112
Joined: Tue Aug 26, 2008 1:01 pm
Location: Orange County, CA

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by MrPopo Sat Dec 21, 2019 3:22 pm

First 50:
1. Octopath Traveler - Switch
2. Dusk - PC
3. Forsaken Remastered - PC
4. Tales of Eternia - PS1
5. Resident Evil 2 (2019) - PC
6. Pokémon Trading Card Game - GBC
7. Metro Exodus - PC
8. Thronebreaker: The Witcher Tales - PC
9. Project Warlock - PC
10. Magic: The Gathering - PC
11. Ghost 1.0 - PC
12. Call of Duty 2 - PC
13. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice - PS4
14. Revelations: The Demon Slayer - GBC
15. Mechstermination Force - Switch
16. Shadow Warrior Classic Redux - PC
17. Lost Sphear - Switch
18. Warcraft II: Beyond the Dark Portal - PC
19. Dragon Quest III - NES
20. Rage 2 - PC
21. Blood - PC
22. Harvest Moon 64 - N64
23. Battlefield V - PC
24. Sigil - PC
25. Shining Force III: Scenario 2 - Saturn
26. Shining Force III: Scenario 3 - Saturn
27. Borderlands 2: Commander Lillith and the Fight for Sanctuary - PC
28. Gato Roboto - Switch
29. Timespinner - Switch
30. Amid Evil - PC
31. Pillars of Eternity II: Beast of Winter - PC
32. Pillars of Eternity II: Seeker, Slayer, Survivor - PC
33. Pillars of Eternity II: The Forgotten Sanctum - PC
34. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night - Switch
35. Orphan - PC
36. Project Nimbus - PC
37. Hardcore Mecha - PC
38. Grey Goo - PC
39. Giants: Citizen Kabuto - PC
40. Wolfenstein: Youngblood - PC
41. Fire Emblem: Three Houses - Switch
42. Metal Wolf Chaos XD - PC
43. Ion Fury - PC
44. Final Fantasy Adventure - GB
45. Astral Chain - Switch
46. Rebel Galaxy Outlaw - PC
47. Blasphemous - Switch
48. Daemon x Machina - Switch
49. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening - Switch
50. Borderlands 3 - PC

51. Valfaris - Switch
52. Unreal: Return to Na Pali - PC
53. The Outer Worlds - PC
54. MechWarrior 4: Black Knight - PC
55. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare - PC
56. Deus Ex: Mankind Divided: System Rift - PC
57. MDK - PC
58. Pokémon Sword - Switch
59. Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order - PC
60. Blazing Chrome - Switch
61. MDK 2 - PC
62. Heavy Gear - PC
63. Virtual-On - Saturn
64. Virtual-On: Oratorio Tangram - DC
65. MechWarrior 5: Mercenaries - PC

Back in 2002 MechWarrior 4: Mercenaries was released, and ended up being the last single player MechWarrior game to be released. The license went fairly dormant afterwards as market trends changed and the Battletech IP went through some shakeup due to FASA closing and Wizkids taking over (we got the MechAssault games, but those are pale imitations). Then in 2013 we got MechWarrior Online. While it was multiplayer only, it had a pretty good feeling combat system. The biggest problem the game had was that the IP fundamentally was not designed around first person PVP balance, which lead to a lot of arbitrary mechanics added on top. But finally, we have a new MechWarrior single player game. And it's pretty damn great.

MechWarrior 5 is set starting in 3015, and the game will let you run all the way to 3048. I'm not sure what happens at that point in-game (I just hit 3039), but in-universe that's when the Clans invade, and that's a story for another game (expansion, sequel, DLC, etc). It starts off with your dad getting killed and you taking over his mercenary unit. But your dad wasn't just randomly killed; there's something he had that people are trying to get. So you have a dual mission of getting revenge, as well as figuring out what was so important to be worth killing for.

The game gives you the entire Inner Sphere to play in, and the map and markets evolve over time as events happen in universe. When the Fourth Succession War hits you get to watch the Capellen Confederation get savaged by the Federated Suns, for example. This mostly serves as a backdrop to things, as your unit is lance-strength and thus never really can make a huge impact on the wider events. But that also means you're free to move from faction to faction, taking jobs as you like. There is a rough path you have to take due to mission difficulty; it'll take you in a wide circle and give you experience with every faction.

There are three high level styles of missions available. Campaign missions are heavily scripted, and they tell the ongoing story. On the flip side are all the randomly generated missions. These are instant-action style in one of five types. Then there's this sort of middle ground, where you can do a short mini-campaign. This usually involves having to do missions on a couple different planets, and those missions have unique voice lines. Some of these mini campaigns have branching paths, which will affect your final rewards. That's one of the reasons to do the campaigns; in addition to the rewards per-mission you also get special rewards for finishing, which can include mechs and special weapons.

When you get read to do a mission you go into the contract negotiation portion, and I think it's the best implementation yet for the series. Every mission has a base payout and some base salvage shares. Then you have a certain number of negotiation points. Some of these are granted based on your global reputation (experience meter). This is then modified by your standing with the faction giving the mission; if they like you then you get more points, if they don't like you then you lose points. These points can be spent to increase your base pay, the number of salvage shares available, or for hazard pay. Hazard pay gives you more cash per negotiation point, but it only pays out to cover damage you take. So if you negotiate 350k of hazard pay but only take 250k damage you only get 250k. Additionally, each of these is capped, so in the later game you will be forced to split your points across multiple categories. The salvage shares are what are used at the end of mission to loot your defeated enemies. Every salvaged mech and component costs a certain number of shares. Basic medium lasers will cost 1, while an AC20 might cost 4-6. Mechs start at 6 shares for a Locust and range all the way up to 26 shares for an Atlas. So there's a lot of thought that goes into how you're going to negotiate, as it'll affect your mission results.

Like previous entries the game has mech customization, but it is at its most restricted here. Every mech has a series of hardpoints of a certain size and type, and you can replace them with another weapon of the same type and same or smaller size. So a mech that normally has a PPC (large energy) can have it ripped out for a Large Laser (large energy), or a Medium Laser (medium energy). This means the smaller slots are much more restricted in what can go in them. Your customization tends to be more about tweaking things to either go from long range to brawling (swap LRMs to SRMs, downgrade energy slots to medium lasers) or to do minor downgrades to max out armor or add heat sinks. This makes every chassis and variant still reasonably unique, whereas before it would come down to something's tonnage and your willingness to spend money.

The moment to moment gameplay really nails the feel of being in a giant walking tank. Weapons feel weighty and kick up a lot of collateral damage. Trees catch fire, smoke billows off particularly good hits, and getting smacked by a flight of missiles effectively disables you from the shake and obscuring your viewscreen. One class of missions involves you needing to level a settlement, and the most effective way is to Kool-Aid Man your way through anything three stories or smaller. Vehicles show up as your regular minor enemy; while they die fast they also carry the same weapons as you, so ignore them at your own peril. The game really gets you into a "one more mission" loop, and if you play well you'll see your forces slowly improve into better hardware. One thing to keep in mind is you'll want to have at least one chassis that's a bit underweight compared to your main forces, as the campaign likes to give slightly more restrictive drop weights than you might be currently used to.

We've been waiting over 15 years for a new single player MechWarrior game and 5 delivers. It's certainly not perfect, but it gives the core of what I want, and that's all that matters. I can only hope it does well and PGI can produce more content; now that they've got the framework down they can only get better.
Image
Games Beaten: 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Blizzard Entertainment Software Developer - All comments and views are my own and not representative of the company.
User avatar
PartridgeSenpai
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 2614
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2015 9:27 am
Location: Northern Japan

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by PartridgeSenpai Sat Dec 21, 2019 6:22 pm

Partridge Senpai's 2019 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018
* indicates a repeat

1. Night Slashers (Switch)
2. Bye-Bye BOXBOY! (3DS)
3. GTA4: The Ballad of Gay Tony (Xbox 360)
4. Katamari Forever (PS3)
5. Detention (PS4)
6. Donkey Kong 64 (N64) *
7. OctoDad: Dadliest Catch (PS4) *
8. FlintHook (Switch)
9. God of War (PS4)
10. God of War HD (PS3)
11. Tiny Barbarian DX (Switch)
12. God of War 2 HD (PS3)
13. Starlink (Switch)
14. Shin Gundam Musou (PS3)
15. Battle & Get! Pokemon Typing DS (DS)
16. Banjo-Kazooie (N64) *
17. Super Mario 64: Rumble Edition (N64)
18. Mario Party 3 (N64) *
19. Paper Mario (N64) *
20. The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (SNES) *
21. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX (GBC) *
22. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages (GBC) *
23. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons (GBC) *
24. Yoshi's Island (SNES) *
25. Super Mario World (SNES) *
26. Super Mario RPG (SFC) *
27. Kaeru No Tame Ni Kane Wa Naru (GB)
28. Final Fantasy VI (SFC) *
29. Final Fantasy IV (SFC) *
30. Final Fantasy V (SFC)
31. Final Fantasy III (Famicom)
32. Mother 2 (SFC) *
33. Mother 3 (GBA) *
34. Hebereke (Famicom)
35. Donkey Kong Country 2 (SFC)
36. Donkey Kong Country 3 (SFC)
37. Donkey Kong Country (SFC) *
38. Wario's Woods (Famicom)
39. Paper Mario: Color Splash (Wii U)
40. Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam (3DS)
41. Luigi's Mansion (3DS) *
42. Paper Mario: Sticker Star (3DS)
43. Mario & Luigi Superstar Saga & Bowser's Minions (3DS)
44. Mario & Luigi: Bowser's Inside Story & Bowser Jr's Journey (3DS)
45. Tomato Adventure (GBA)
46. Corpse Party (PSP)
47. Rave Master: Fighting Live (GC)
48. Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow (GBA) *
49. Castlevania: Circle of the Moon (GBA)
50. Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance (GBA) *
51. New Super Mario Bros. 2 (3DS)
52. The Outer Worlds (Xbone)
53. Momodora: Reverie Under the Moonlight (Xbone)
54. Guacamelee 2 (Xbone)
55. Steamworld Dig 2 (Xbone)
56. Yoku's Island Express (Xbone)
57. Guacamelee (Xbone) *
58. Blazing Chrome (Xbone)
59. Minit (Xbone)
60. Dishonored 2 (Xbone)
61. Deus Ex: Mankind Divided (Xbone)
62. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night (Xbone)
63. Recore: Definitive Edition (Xbone)
64. Ori and the Blind Forest: Definitive Edition (Xbone)
65. Super Lucky's Tale (Xbone)
66. Snake Pass (Xbone)

67. My Friend Pedro - Blood Bullets Bananas (Xbone)

A quirky action game, this is very on-brand for Devolver Digital, and I'd heard it bandied about on some GOTY lists, so I thought I'd give it a try on Game Pass. It's a good game, but I don't really think it's for me. That said, I enjoyed the 3 or so hours it took me to beat it on normal mode, even if I don't see myself ever going back to this game.

If you've ever played Hotline Miami, then My Friend Pedro's core conceit should be very familiar. Go through a level doing kills as quickly and efficiently as you can to try and get a high score (or at least finish the level). The twists MFP brings to the table are that this is a side-scroller instead of top-down, you have far more health than the basically one-hit deaths of Hotline Miami, and it has a bullet-time feature where you can slow down time to aim shots better. You can use 5 different types of guns, you can wall jump, kick stuff, make barrels fall onto people, kick a gas canister into their face and then shoot it before it falls onto the ground to make their buddies blow into tiny pieces and then kick the pieces into the face of the buddy who didn't get blown up. There's a lot of silly nonsense you can pull in this game if you get into it enough, and the top scoring runs for this game must look suuuper awesome.

The story is neat, but not that important. You're an amnesiac who wakes up in the back of a butcher shop about to be killed, but your hallucinatory banana friend Pedro gives you bullet time powers and helps lead you on your quest to horrible bloody murder (and safety). The world has a very neon, flashy look to it that clashes with a grungy, dirty dystopian flair. It's not the neon super-vomit style of Hotline Miami, and it's not entirely unique, but it looks nice.

Verdict: Hesitantly Recommended. At least for my tastes, this hasn't really come close to replacing Hotline Miami (coincidentally enough also a Devolver Digital game) in my heart. The lower recommendation is almost entirely down to it not really meshing with my tastes and it not really overcoming the quality of Hotline Miami for me. If I had to tell you which of the two to pick, I'd say HM every time, but if you're all Hotline Miami'd out and want something similar but different, this game is something you'll probably like a lot.
I identify everyone via avatar, so if you change your avatar, I genuinely might completely forget who you are. -- Me
User avatar
alienjesus
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 8374
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 7:10 pm
Location: London, UK.

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by alienjesus Sun Dec 22, 2019 2:04 pm

Games Beaten 2019:
First 50:
1. Super Smash Bros. Ultimate Switch
2. Alex Kidd in The Enchanted Castle Switch
3. Streets of Rage Switch
4. Vectorman Switch
5. Galaxy Force II Switch
6. Flicky Switch
7. Phantasy Star 2 Switch
8. Sonic the Hedgehog Switch
9. Altered Beast Switch
10. ESWAT: City Under Siege Switch
11. Columns Switch
12. Virtua Fighter 2 Switch
13. Kirby Star Allies Switch
14. Katamari Damacy Reroll Switch eShop
15. Pokémon: Let's Go, Eevee! Switch
16. Octodad: Dadliest Catch Switch eShop
17. Sword of Vermilion Switch
18. Decap Attack Switch
19. Golden Axe Switch
20. The Revenge of Shinobi Switch
21. Beyond Oasis Switch
22. WarioWare Gold 3DS
23. Shining in the Darkness Switch
24. Kid Chameleon Switch
25. Streets of Rage 2 Switch
26. Bio-Hazard Battle Switch
27. Super Thunder Blade Switch
28. Gain Ground Switch
29. Phantasy Star III: Generations of Doom Switch
30. Sonic the Hedgehog 2 Switch
31. Comix Zone Switch
32. Vectorman 2 Switch
33. Light Crusader Switch
34. Crack Down Switch
35. ToeJam and Earl Switch
36. Dynamite Headdy Switch
37. Golden Axe II Switch
38. Shadow Dancer: The Secret of Shinobi Switch
39. Columns III: Revenge of Columns Switch
40. Shining Force: The Legacy of Great Intention Switch
41. Kirby No Kirakira Kizzu Game Boy
42. Klonoa Wii
43. Looney Tunes Collector: Martian Alert! GBC
44. Mario Tennis N64
45. Fire Emblem Warriors Switch
46. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time [Randomiser] N64
47. The New Zealand Story SMS
48. Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana Switch
49. Shenmue 2 Dreamcast
50. Castlevania GBA

51. Mario Party N64
52. ActRaiser SNES
53. GoldenEye 007 N64
54. Mom Hid My Game Switch eShop
55. Money Puzzle Exchanger Switch eShop
56. Gunbird Switch eShop
57. Tokyo School Life Switch eShop
58. Musynx Switch
59. Gremlins 2: The New Batch NES
60. Subsurface Circular Switch eShop
61. Yoshi's Woolly World Wii U
62. ToeJam & Earl: Panic on Funkotron Switch
63. Bare Knuckle III Switch
64. Gunstar Heroes Switch
65. Space Harrier II Switch
66. Sonic Spinball Switch
67. Phantasy Star IV: The End of the Millennium Switch
68. Sonic 3D Blast Switch
69. Rabbids Go Home Wii
70. Alien Storm Switch
71. Alien Soldier Switch
72. Untitled Goose Game Switch eShop
73. Landstalker: The Treasures of King Nole Switch
74. Fatal Labyrinth Switch
75. Ristar Switch
76. Golden Axe III Switch
77. Shinobi III: Return of the Ninja Master Switch
78. Dr. Robotnik's Mean Bean Machine Switch
79. Bonanza Bros. Switch
80. Shining Force II [& Sega Mega Drive Classics] Switch
81. Castlevania Bloodlines Switch
82. Puyo Puyo Sun 64 N64
83. Chameleon Twist 2 N64
84. Cruis'n USA N64
85. Darkwing Duck Game Boy
86. Fortified Zone Game Boy
87. Lock 'N Chase Game Boy
88. Spanky's Quest Game Boy
89. Looney Tunes Collector: Martian Revenge! GBC
90. Puchi Carat PS1
91. Battle Garegga Rev. 2016 PS4
92. Flower PS4
93. FlOw PS4


Puchi Carat

Image

I regularly visit a retro gaming market event in London which runs 3 times a year. I often go with an idea of what I want to find, but just as often I find myself leaving with a stack of completely unplanned purchases. On one such occasion, I ended up purchasing a selection of PS1 games. I picked up Hogs of War, which I remember enjoying as a kid, Command & Conquer: Red Alert, which I picked up for much the same reason, Bishi Bashi Special which I chose because it was a childhood favourite of my wife’s and Sheep Dog & Wolf which I remember seeing in a magazine as a kid which lauded it and thinking I’d like to play it. And finally, I picked up Puchi Carat. Unlike the other games, I had no experience of any kind with it, but I saw the box, thought it looked like a fun competitive puzzle game like Puyo Puyo or Puzzle Bobble, and as it was cheap and in a genre I liked, figured it was worth a punt.

Image

And so when I came to play Puchi Carat after, I booted it up and was greeted by the familiar Japanese puzzle game stylings. Colourful and cut characters to choose from, badly translated engrish localisation, and some bouncy happy music. And then I played the game, and was surprised to discover that it wasn’t quite what I was expecting. See, Puchi Carat puts across the appearance of a Puzzle Bobble clone, but when you play, you realise that it’s actually more like head-to-head Breakout.

Image

You bounce a ball around the screen hitting into gems up above you and destroying them. Like Puzzle Bobble, taking out a gem which has other gems beneath can cause the whole bunch to drop off at once, and this is the aim of the game – as this will send more lines of gems to the opponents screen. You can press down to make more gems appear on your own screen too, which can be essential to continuing to press the attack, but obvious it carries the risk of an enemy attack sending your gem stack over the lines and causing you to game over.

Image

And that’s basically all there is to Puchi Carat. There’s an arcade mode where you play through 10 or so stages against various computer opponents, but there’s little different between levels. The music of the game is bouncy enough but basically forgettable, and the graphics are nice looking but not exactly top tier for the system.

Image

The main problem with Puchi Carat then, is that it just…doesn’t really work. Breakout doesn’t feel like a balanced and fair game to play head to head, because its too hard to take out the blocks you need – it’s not as direct or controllable as shooting bubbles in Puzzle Bobble, so it just feels luck dependent if you can save yourself after a big attack. Puzzle Bobble does often require a bit of luck to get the right colours to save yourself, but it’s much quicker to take action and feels much more fair. Puchi Carat, unfortunately, whilst a surprise from what I was expecting, was not a good one. I wish it had been the generic puzzle game I thought it was, because I suspect I would enjoy it more.





Battle Garegga Rev. 2016

Image

I often find it hard to shmups like Battle Garegga because I often don’t understand or appreciate all of the complex underlying mechanics for scoring, gaining credits and powering up that many of these later shmups have. So I just give my review from the perspective of someone who enjoys playing games where you have to avoid the brightly coloured bullets and leave it at that.

Image

Battle Garegga Rev. 2016 though, ended up being a game where having at least a basic understanding of some of the underlying mechanics really felt necessary to appreciating it properly. This is a game that doesn’t mess around, and understanding how and why some things happen feel necessary to being able to handle it appropriately.

Image

And so, I researched a bit, and found out about how there are hidden patterns of options if you grab 5 of the same power up in a row before getting an option power up. Or how point medals increase in value for each one you grab without missing them. Or how there are secret points where you can set stuff off in the background of the stage for extra points, such as releasing a flock of flamingos in stage 2. Or how you can kill enemies by kamikaze-ing into them and defeating them with your exploding shrapnel. And most importantly, that you might actually want to do that if you’re playing especially well, because this game gets harder the better you’re doing, and having too many lives and scoring too highly can result in the game becoming unwinnably hard.

Image

Not that that mattered too much, though, because Battle Garegga is pretty damn tough. Even earlier on, enemies can be pretty relentless, and this is pone of those awkward games that’s kind of on the cusp between the modern idea of a bullet hell and the more old school type of shmup – there’s plenty of bullets flying about, but they’re often a bit faster and less predictable that the likes of Caves shmups.

Image

This port was done by M2, and they’ve done a lot to try and make the game accessible. There are various difficulty options available, including the arcade original and various easier arranged modes. Playing modes with limited continues unlocks extra credits each time you game over for later attempts. And there are a ton of optional widgets you can show on screen which display things like which power ups you’ve recently grabbed and what’s next for handling point acquisition and options etc.

Image

Overall though, I think the appeal of Battle Garegga is really in these complexities. As a game just played for the sake of playing a shmup, it feels underwhelming to me – setpieces aren’t especially exciting for the genre and the levels, standard ships and weaponry aren’t too memorable either. But overall, I’d say I had a decent time exploring the game in a little more depth than I might normally, even despite how obtuse it can be. This is worth a play, and hardcore shmup fans swear by it. As a more fairweather fan though, I’d give it a recommendation, but it wouldn’t be my top choice.





Flower

Image

Flower is a game that I’ve been fairly interested since it was released on PS3 several years ago. It seemed like a relaxing and beautiful game, and at the time of it’s release it was one of only a handful of games that interested me on the system. It wasn’t until years and years later I’d actually get the game though, as part of the Journey collection on PS4.

Image

And wow, this game really does look great. I purchased myself an OLED TV earlier in the year, and the colours look incredible on it with this game. As you soar through the levels between the blades of grass and the flowers bloom, it really is joyous in a way that’s hard to describe.

Image

The gameplay of Flower is fairly simple – you control a gust of wind full of petals by tilting the controller to move. As you fly past flowers, they bloom and petals from them join your trail, creating a wave of colour in the wake. Once you bloom multiple flowers in an area, then colour will often burst forth and grass and flowers will grow in the area all around them.

Image

The game only contains 6 levels, but it does mix things up on occasion. One stage has you flying around at night, able to illuminate the environment instead of just colouring it in. One has you flying around on gusts from windmills. And one has you navigating a valley full of electric pylons which jut out from the environment. Unfortunately, this last level is by far the worst in the game – the game is at is best when it’s relaxing and allows you to move at your own pace, but the clumsiness of the controls don’t lend themselves to dodging hazards very well. I can see what they’re going for, as this level is the penultimate one and they wanted the game to have an emotional low point to build up to a finale, but it was the one level I didn’t enjoy, and it was because it just didn’t feel like it worked.

Image

Overall though, Flower was a relaxing couple of hours. It’s a good game for a relaxing weekend afternoon, and it makes you feel good just from how it looks and feels to play. The controls are loose and imperfect, but it doesn’t really feel like a problem most of the time. ThatGameCompany would go on to make the superior Journey after this, but Flower is still worth a play. I’d recommend it.





FlOw

Image

Having now played both Journey and Flower, I decided to play the final game on the Journey collection (and the first game of the 3 released): FlOw. Flow (which I’ll be writing like this now because screw the stupid stylisation) is a game where you play as one of several microorganisms and must consume others to grow your body and become bigger and stronger.

Image

The first of these micro-organisms is a worm like creature with mandibles on the front. You can speed up by pressing X, and by passing over edible parts of another organism with your mouth will eat that part, adding it to your own body. Small creatures will be eaten instantly, but larger creatures will need each individual part eaten to defeat them. Other creatures are capable of eating parts of you too, so it’s survival of the fittest.

Image

Each stage takes place on a 2D plane, but you can move ‘up’ and ‘down’ from these planes to other ones at will, to escape from danger or to advance further. You can move up and down by eating red or blue enemies who will send you up or down depending on the colour. This can be done at any time – there’s no need to eat everything on each level.

Image

Reaching the bottom will give you a boss fight of sorts vs a powered up enemy, and then beating them will release an egg for another creature, which you can then play as. Each creature has different abilities – the jellyfish can lure enemies in by spinning, a poison worm can paralyse enemies it contacts, and a fish creature can dive at enemy weak points. The core gameplay is ultimately the same though, which is the games main flaw – it’s short, easy and repetitive. The game is relaxing enough, but it lacks depth, despite going deeper being the core of the gameplay.

Image

Overall, Flow feels like more of a style over substance kind of game. The bold colours and minimal aesthetic are very stylish, but there’s not a lot to the game besides. I was fed up of it way before I beat it as all 6 creatures, and I have no real desire to go back to it now I’m done. Flow is an OK game, but it’s not one I’d recommend. It definitely outstays it’s welcome.
Image
User avatar
MrPopo
Moderator
 
Posts: 23112
Joined: Tue Aug 26, 2008 1:01 pm
Location: Orange County, CA

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by MrPopo Sun Dec 22, 2019 4:48 pm

First 50:
1. Octopath Traveler - Switch
2. Dusk - PC
3. Forsaken Remastered - PC
4. Tales of Eternia - PS1
5. Resident Evil 2 (2019) - PC
6. Pokémon Trading Card Game - GBC
7. Metro Exodus - PC
8. Thronebreaker: The Witcher Tales - PC
9. Project Warlock - PC
10. Magic: The Gathering - PC
11. Ghost 1.0 - PC
12. Call of Duty 2 - PC
13. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice - PS4
14. Revelations: The Demon Slayer - GBC
15. Mechstermination Force - Switch
16. Shadow Warrior Classic Redux - PC
17. Lost Sphear - Switch
18. Warcraft II: Beyond the Dark Portal - PC
19. Dragon Quest III - NES
20. Rage 2 - PC
21. Blood - PC
22. Harvest Moon 64 - N64
23. Battlefield V - PC
24. Sigil - PC
25. Shining Force III: Scenario 2 - Saturn
26. Shining Force III: Scenario 3 - Saturn
27. Borderlands 2: Commander Lillith and the Fight for Sanctuary - PC
28. Gato Roboto - Switch
29. Timespinner - Switch
30. Amid Evil - PC
31. Pillars of Eternity II: Beast of Winter - PC
32. Pillars of Eternity II: Seeker, Slayer, Survivor - PC
33. Pillars of Eternity II: The Forgotten Sanctum - PC
34. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night - Switch
35. Orphan - PC
36. Project Nimbus - PC
37. Hardcore Mecha - PC
38. Grey Goo - PC
39. Giants: Citizen Kabuto - PC
40. Wolfenstein: Youngblood - PC
41. Fire Emblem: Three Houses - Switch
42. Metal Wolf Chaos XD - PC
43. Ion Fury - PC
44. Final Fantasy Adventure - GB
45. Astral Chain - Switch
46. Rebel Galaxy Outlaw - PC
47. Blasphemous - Switch
48. Daemon x Machina - Switch
49. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening - Switch
50. Borderlands 3 - PC

51. Valfaris - Switch
52. Unreal: Return to Na Pali - PC
53. The Outer Worlds - PC
54. MechWarrior 4: Black Knight - PC
55. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare - PC
56. Deus Ex: Mankind Divided: System Rift - PC
57. MDK - PC
58. Pokémon Sword - Switch
59. Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order - PC
60. Blazing Chrome - Switch
61. MDK 2 - PC
62. Heavy Gear - PC
63. Virtual-On - Saturn
64. Virtual-On: Oratorio Tangram - DC
65. MechWarrior 5: Mercenaries - PC
66. Metaltech: Earthsiege - PC

Back when I was a kid I saw a magazine review for a game called Earthsiege, where you would pilot giant robots to defeat a computer force that was trying to wipe out humanity. It sounded awesome, so I asked for it for Chanukah from my parents. They got me MechWarrior 2 instead. And now, having played both games, I can say that I am glad they made the decision/mistake they did. Earthsiege is a decent title for an early 3D game but it has some very rough edges and some major balance issues that force you to play in a pretty specific way if you want to get through.

The basic premise is that humanity developed AI, let it pilot giant robots to so humans wouldn't have to die in the wars between nations, then the AI was like "fuck that shit" and nuked humanity. Now the human resistance must take back Earth in their own giant robots. The game consists of five campaigns chosen from eight total campaigns; if you are on the "win" path you will only ever see a fixed set of five campaigns, as the other three are alternate campaigns for the middle of the game if you fail the final mission of a campaign. A campaign consists of 7-8 missions that are a mixture of fixed missions and missions drawn from a pool. The fixed missions are used for introducing technology (do this mission successfully and you capture a new weapon/unlock a new mech) and as the main "story" beats (I use quotes because the story is extremely thin). Then the missions in between are drawn from a series of generic missions. These are randomly chosen when you choose to move on to the next mission (so if you reload beforehand you can potentially get a different one), and by the end of the game you'll definitely see some repeats. They do have some randomized parameters within them (the save a pilot one has him randomly appear somewhere on your patrol route, for example), so it isn't "I just did this exact thing", but it's close. You can fail these missions at no real penalty, though too much failure will end the campaign.

To do the missions you and up to three other pilots will use giant stompy robots. These are much more utilitarian than the anime-inspired designs of Battletech. Basically they take the form of legs, a tower, and a bunch of guns stapled to that tower. You are free to customize what weapons are on each mech, but a given hardpoint can only fit a subset of weaponry. So you can use the biggest weapon available on each hardpoint, but one hardpoint might only be for missiles, or only big guns, while another is more versatile. Your weaponry can be divided into four categories. The first is your basic guns, which are lasers and gatling guns. These are your bread and butter, with the main difference being one uses ammo and one uses energy (which replenishes, but also powers your shields). Next are the missile weapons, which are very ammo constrained and have various ways of homing. They're also a perfect example of a great AI weapon, as the computer is able to use them well while they are quite hard for the player to use well. The third is your big guns; these have a slow refire rate and big damage. They're also useless due to a quirk of the engine I'll get into in a bit. Finally there's the ECM item, which is used in certain missions but mostly isn't worthwhile. Passive radar gives you basically all the real benefits of ECM without announcing your presence.

Speaking of passive radar, the game is very heavily inspired by flight sims. It has a few too many toggles and goes for using things like MFDs you have to switch between for information and one screen that requires you to look away from your cockpit windows to see. If your radar is on passive you only see enemy emissions but enemies have trouble finding you. You can switch to active which acts as a magnet but also lets you guide your radar aimed missiles. For the most part active radar isn't worth it; I usually only toggle it quickly to get a quick view of what's going on, as well as dealing with fighters (which are the most obnoxious enemy in the game).

Now, the game engine has a pitiful draw distance, something like 100-200 in game meters. The game does not let you deal damage to anything it hasn't actually rendered, even if you're locked on. Your main guns have that range. So all those big guns with a huge standoff range? Pointless. And the best way to take out a mech is by quickly taking out the legs. There's two reasons; one is that one leg disables it and legs aren't that strong. The second is that legging a mech means you get the most rewards at the end of the mission. So those big guns again just end up falling flat. You're best off just packing guns and lasers (all lasers would deplete your energy too fast) and leg everything you see. This also means that there's a couple of mechs that are better as AI mechs, as they have less gun hardpoints than the mech before it but have a bunch more missiles.

The game does have a decent mission variety. You have patrols, base destructions, base defenses, but then you also have recons (get in, target something, get out) and infiltrations (go on this circuitous route and then do something at the end). So there's reason to keep around the little mechs in the end game to do some of the recon stuff. Otherwise you'll replace it as you run out of space for the bigger mechs. You should always be building a new mech, as the game introduces them when you need more firepower and they have a build time. You will not be able to have a full stable of the best stuff because of the time involved, so always have something in the hopper.

The biggest problem the game has is they came at it from "what if our flight sim was a walking tank?" rather than focusing on the power fantasy of "I have a giant mech". MechWarrior 2 adds in a lot of quality of life improvements that, while maintaining the feel of a sim, smooth out the rough edges so that the player can focus on the fun parts. If we're set in the future (500 years in the case of Earthsiege) then let's imagine that user interfaces aren't as clumsy as modern military hardware.
Image
Games Beaten: 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Blizzard Entertainment Software Developer - All comments and views are my own and not representative of the company.
User avatar
alienjesus
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 8374
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 7:10 pm
Location: London, UK.

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by alienjesus Sun Dec 22, 2019 5:52 pm

Games Beaten 2019:
First 50:
1. Super Smash Bros. Ultimate Switch
2. Alex Kidd in The Enchanted Castle Switch
3. Streets of Rage Switch
4. Vectorman Switch
5. Galaxy Force II Switch
6. Flicky Switch
7. Phantasy Star 2 Switch
8. Sonic the Hedgehog Switch
9. Altered Beast Switch
10. ESWAT: City Under Siege Switch
11. Columns Switch
12. Virtua Fighter 2 Switch
13. Kirby Star Allies Switch
14. Katamari Damacy Reroll Switch eShop
15. Pokémon: Let's Go, Eevee! Switch
16. Octodad: Dadliest Catch Switch eShop
17. Sword of Vermilion Switch
18. Decap Attack Switch
19. Golden Axe Switch
20. The Revenge of Shinobi Switch
21. Beyond Oasis Switch
22. WarioWare Gold 3DS
23. Shining in the Darkness Switch
24. Kid Chameleon Switch
25. Streets of Rage 2 Switch
26. Bio-Hazard Battle Switch
27. Super Thunder Blade Switch
28. Gain Ground Switch
29. Phantasy Star III: Generations of Doom Switch
30. Sonic the Hedgehog 2 Switch
31. Comix Zone Switch
32. Vectorman 2 Switch
33. Light Crusader Switch
34. Crack Down Switch
35. ToeJam and Earl Switch
36. Dynamite Headdy Switch
37. Golden Axe II Switch
38. Shadow Dancer: The Secret of Shinobi Switch
39. Columns III: Revenge of Columns Switch
40. Shining Force: The Legacy of Great Intention Switch
41. Kirby No Kirakira Kizzu Game Boy
42. Klonoa Wii
43. Looney Tunes Collector: Martian Alert! GBC
44. Mario Tennis N64
45. Fire Emblem Warriors Switch
46. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time [Randomiser] N64
47. The New Zealand Story SMS
48. Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana Switch
49. Shenmue 2 Dreamcast
50. Castlevania GBA

51. Mario Party N64
52. ActRaiser SNES
53. GoldenEye 007 N64
54. Mom Hid My Game Switch eShop
55. Money Puzzle Exchanger Switch eShop
56. Gunbird Switch eShop
57. Tokyo School Life Switch eShop
58. Musynx Switch
59. Gremlins 2: The New Batch NES
60. Subsurface Circular Switch eShop
61. Yoshi's Woolly World Wii U
62. ToeJam & Earl: Panic on Funkotron Switch
63. Bare Knuckle III Switch
64. Gunstar Heroes Switch
65. Space Harrier II Switch
66. Sonic Spinball Switch
67. Phantasy Star IV: The End of the Millennium Switch
68. Sonic 3D Blast Switch
69. Rabbids Go Home Wii
70. Alien Storm Switch
71. Alien Soldier Switch
72. Untitled Goose Game Switch eShop
73. Landstalker: The Treasures of King Nole Switch
74. Fatal Labyrinth Switch
75. Ristar Switch
76. Golden Axe III Switch
77. Shinobi III: Return of the Ninja Master Switch
78. Dr. Robotnik's Mean Bean Machine Switch
79. Bonanza Bros. Switch
80. Shining Force II [& Sega Mega Drive Classics] Switch
81. Castlevania Bloodlines Switch eShop
82. Puyo Puyo Sun 64 N64
83. Chameleon Twist 2 N64
84. Cruis'n USA N64
85. Darkwing Duck Game Boy
86. Fortified Zone Game Boy
87. Lock 'N Chase Game Boy
88. Spanky's Quest Game Boy
89. Looney Tunes Collector: Martian Revenge! GBC
90. Puchi Carat PS1
91. Battle Garegga Rev. 2016 PS4
92. Flower PS4
93. FlOw PS4
94. The Longest 5 Minutes Switch
95. West of Loathing Switch
96. Pokémon Sword Switch




The Longest 5 Minutes

Image

After playing through a bunch of Game Boy and PS4 games, I decided to play through a selection of Switch RPGs back to back. It wasn’t really planned, it just ended up being what I played. The first of these 3 games was The Longest 5 Minutes, a game that I’d picked up because I found the premise interesting. The game starts with you fighting the demon king, with only 5 minutes until he destroys the world – however, you quickly realise that you’ve lost all your memories and you can’t remember anything – how or why you’re here, any of your skills or magic, or who these other people are who are with you. Thus begins the Longest 5 Minutes of your life, as you try and remember everything whilst also defeating the demon king before the end of the world.

Image

You remember everything in the form of flashbacks. These throw you back to an earlier point in the story. You’ll be sent back to an earlier time and told what level you’re at (RPG level 5 for example) and then you play through a segment of the earlier game until you remember something important. This can then normally be used during the fight against the demon lord (which takes place as a visual novel type more than an RPG. Each time you jump back in time you’ll find your spells, equipment, money and level different to before – you can’t keep it, so might as well make use of everything you can.

Image

Unfortunately, there are a few issues with the way the flashbacks are handled gameplay wise. The game sets you back to an earlier point, but without fail you’re already strong enough at the beginning of the flashback to beat the boss at the end of the flashback without too much difficulty. This results in a few issues – first of all, there’s no sense of challenge as it’s so easy. Secondly, there’s a lack of a feeling of progression as any grinding is unnecessary and will be lost by the next flashback. And finally, it makes battles quite worthless because of this – if you just want to experience the story, the best way is to cast the spell which makes enemies not appear over and over, and just walk through each dungeon to the story points.

Image

So the RPG gameplay isn’t really the focus here – in truth, this is really a visual novel masquerading as an old-school RPG, and so the story is the focus. Thus, the game lives and dies on the quality of it’s writing, and if I’m being honest, that isn’t the greatest either. Plotlines are predictable and kinda immature overall, and the interesting premise of the flashbacks is somewhat wasted – I expected this to result in lots of non-linear storytelling where you piece together parts from all over the story gradually, but in reality, each successive flashback generally takes you to the next part of the story in order – so you’ll experience the adventure from beginning to end as normal, just broken up by the demon king encounter every so often.

Image

That’s not to say there’s nothing to like about The Longest 5 Minutes though. Despite it’s numerous missteps, the game is still enjoyable in it’s own way, and the characters whilst simple and cliché are charming and likeable too. The story isn’t phenomenal, but there are a few highlights here and I actually found the ending in particular to be both a little tropey but also pretty affective and emotional. The graphics of the game are very simple, but some of the enemy designs in particular are really amusing and creative, and I’d be absolute remiss if I didn’t mention the quality of the soundtrack, which shines well above the decentish story and basic graphics – this is an absolutely phenomenal score that I highly recommend giving a listen to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RZpHyRCChs&list=PLzMaKUs3kzJQUzwu2ElITdEuInfvTIcv-&index=2&t=0s

Image

In honesty, it’s hard to recommend The Longest 5 Minutes. It’s a game with a super interesting concept but a really disappointing execution. But there is something about it – I did have a decent time with the game and I definitely wouldn’t say I disliked it. The game had enough charm to make the ending hit home, and it was probably helped along a lot by it’s fantastic score. If you find it cheap, it’s worth taking a gamble on this, but don’t expect it to knock your socks off.





West of Loathing

Image

After finishing The Longest 5 Minutes, I decided to start up West of Loathing. West of Loathing is a game I picked up when it was being sold by Limited Run Games. I’d not really hard of it at that point, but whenever they sell something that looks interesting, I always check out some reviews to see if it’s worth getting, and reviews of West of Loathing were pretty glowing. And so I gave it a go.

Image

West of Loathing is an RPG set in the wild west, drawn using a simple stick figure art style and black and white graphics. It’s by the guys who did Kingdom of Loathing, the old browser based RPG game – which I’d previously heard of but knew little about. You set out on an adventure to make your fortune, or help people, or for the sake of the adventure itself (depending on your choice) as one of 3 character classes – the melee focused Cow Puncher, the magic wielding chef the Bean Slinger, or the silver tongued, rootin’ tootin’ shootin’ Snake Oiler. I went with Snake Oiler personally.

Image

The game is a very simple RPG – early on you can recruit one of several partners who join you in battle. You can equip a pistol and melee weapon to use in battle, plus various armour pieces (hat, body, trousers, boots, off hand item and lapel embellishments) to boost your stats. Normal attacks are free and use up your turn, but you also get special abilities which use up a limited stock of AP (replenished after each battle) with various effects – as a snake oiler I got some which showered enemies with bullets or pulled out snakes from my suitcase to join me in battle. Finally, you can use items too – these are limited but often can be used without taking up a whole turn, making them incredibly strong.

Image

The game uses a progression system based on stats and abilities. Your core stats are Muscle (attack and defence), Mysticality (Magic attack and defence), and Moxie (Ranged attack and defence). However you also have other stats in Grit, Gumption and Glamour. These affect things like HP, speed and luck, but all stats also have other uses – certain options are available to people with high enough stats in any of the 6 – allowing you to use your glamour to swindle someone out of an item instead of fighting for it for example, or using muscle to break through a door without a key.

Image

In addition to stats, you get perks and skills which offer other role-playing advantages. Some of these are straight up benefits – such as Goblintongue which allows you to speak to goblins, whilst others need to be levelled up too, such as Hornswogglin’ which lets you con people – higher levels lets you pull off more ambitious deceptions. There are also negative perks which lower stats. All of these abilities often present multiple options to solve tasks and puzzles – this game has an impressive range of options of how to progress.

Image

For all of it’s role-playing achievements though, the true reason to play West of Loathing is the writing. This is a genuinely laugh-out-loud funny game. The humour is often silly (one of the first perks makes you walk in stupid ways every time you move) but it can also include some incredibly funny wordplay. I’m sure some of my screenshots will show some of the humour off. There’s so much good writing here too – the game has a surprisingly large amount of content, with tons of sidequests and secrets to find. In game options often lock out other options too, so there’s likely a ton of fun content I’ll experience for the first time if I replay the game in future. The story is lacking a bit in it’s finale – it feels like it’s trying to wrap up something that wasn’t really set up, but having done as much content as I could find up to that point, I was fine with that.

Image

Obviously, this isn’t an astonishingly good looking game, but it pulls off the art style in a way that feels deliberate and charming rather than lazy and lacking. The music of the game is wonderfully on point, with a fun classic western vibe that I really loved.

Image

I can’t recommend West of Loathing enough. It’s creative, charming and incredibly funny. I enjoyed every minute I spent with the game, and I’m looking forward to replaying it as another class some day. I would go out and pick this up right away if you’re a fan of RPGs and silly humour. It’s fantastic.





Pokemon Sword

Image

Pokémon Sword was a game with a lof of controversy leading up to it’s release. People were angry about every little thing it seemed, and they weren’t afraid to show it. I know some people who have been put off by the changes this game made and vowed not to play it. Personally, I thought that was rather short sighted, so I avoided the internet as much as possible leading up to the games release and gave it a go so I could see it based on it’s own merits.

Image

Pokemon Sword and Shield are set in the Galar region, a region modelled after a rather idyllic version of the UK, so I may have some biases here, but I had a great time playing through the game. It makes some changes, some for the better and some for the worse, but overall I still found myself enjoying the game for what it is – this is still the same old Pokémon at it’s core, and I actually think if you’re going to level a criticism at it, that’s the one it might deserve – it’s still the same old Pokemon. That is fine by me though.

Image

The plot of the game is back to basics, with you setting out to beat the gym challenge and challenge the champion of the region. I really like what they did with this challenge though, with it feeling more like a sports league – there’s professional organisations dedicated to setting up the league, and matches take place in big stadiums with cheering crowds and are broadcast on TV. The gym theme is also fantastic and I love it, take a listen: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcV6xVukj60 . There’s a few little twists along the way, but this is as close to the set-up for Red and Blue as pokemon has been in a while. Another new features I really liked was the Wild Area. This is a large open area with tons of pokemon available, where you can roam freely and find pokemon whoa re much too strong for you early in the game. The area has a free camera, a first for the series, and it really feels like it could be a tentative first step to a more open future pokemon game.

Image

There are also some things I disliked – the game feels a little narrow in scope, even compared to the already narrow feeling Sun & Moon. There are less trainers in routes, routes feel smaller and sparser, and there are less of them. The postgame is rather lacking too, and most of the caves and forests that made up dungeons in the mast are now short and linear, with no puzzles. The game has made the exp. Share compulsory (giving your whole party exp for every battle) which feels like a move to make up for the lack of trainers. It feels like there should be more here than there is, all things considered.

Image

Graphically, the game really isn’t a looker for the Switch, but it gets the job done. It’s a pretty basic looking title overall with a few surprising performance issues, but at the same time there are a few sections where the game just looks really nice. The pokemon still look great, if not really any better than on 3DS, and I really liked the new selection of Pokemon available this time. My team was made up of Dubwool, Corviknight, Coalossal, Polteageist, Sirfetch’d and Hatterene by the end of the game. There’s a lot being said about the lack of being able to catch ‘em all this time, but that really doesn’t bother me much – I acknowledge that they can’t just keep adding forever, I rarely transfer old pokemon anyway and the 400 available in game are more than enough to offer diversity in team building.

Image

So, the thing with Pokémon Sword is know that it could and should be a better and more polished game than it is – as a new game in a super popular franchise that’s one of Nintendo’s biggest IPs, it really should have done more. But I can’t deny the fun I had playing it – I truly had a blast from start to finish with this game, and so I can’t help but to happily recommend it. For all it’s flaws, Pokemon Sword and Shield is still a ton of fun.

Image
Image
User avatar
Ack
Moderator
 
Posts: 21513
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2008 4:26 pm
Location: Atlanta, GA

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by Ack Sun Dec 22, 2019 7:34 pm

The First 50:
1. Dusk (PC)(FPS)
2. Project: Snowblind (PC)(FPS)
3. Soldier of Fortune: Platinum Edition (PC)(FPS)
4. Ziggurat (PC)(FPS)
5. Wolfenstein 3D: Ultimate Challenge (PC)(FPS)
6. Destiny 2 (PC)(FPS/RPG)
7. Destiny 2: Curse of Osiris (PC)(FPS/RPG)
8. Destiny 2: Warmind (PC)(FPS/RPG)

9. Destiny 2: Forsaken (PC)(FPS/RPG)
10. Star Wars: Rebel Assault (PC)(Rail Shooter)

11. Castle Werewolf (PC)(FPS)
12. Project Warlock (PC)(FPS)
13. Castle Crashers (PC)(Hack and Slash)
14. This Strange Realm of Mine (PC)(FPS)
15. BioShock Remastered (PC)(FPS)
16. BioShock 2 (PC)(FPS)
17. BioShock 2: Minerva's Den (PC)(FPS)

18. Blood (PC)(FPS)
19. Blood: Cryptic Passage (PC)(FPS)
20. Blood: Post Mortem (PC)(FPS)

21. Shadow Warrior (PC)(FPS)
22. Shadow Warrior: Twin Dragon (PC)(FPS)
23. Shadow Warrior: Wanton Destruction (PC)(FPS)

24. F.E.A.R. 2: Project Origin (PC)(FPS)
25. F.E.A.R. 2: Reborn (PC)(FPS)

26. Vampire: The Masquerade - Bloodlines (PC)(RPG)
27. Men of Valor (PC)(FPS)
28. Ultima III: Exodus (PC)(RPG)
29. Albedo: Eyes from Outer Space (PC)(Point and Click)

30. Midnight Ultra (PC)(FPS)
31. Amid Evil (PC)(FPS)
32. Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic (PC)(RPG)
33. Betrayer (PC)(Horror)

34. Borderlands 2: Commander Lilith & the Fight for Sanctuary (PC)(FPS/RPG)
35. Far Cry 2 (PC)(FPS)
36. Apocryph (PC)(FPS)
37. Eye of the Beholder III: Assault on Myth Drannor (PC)(RPG)

38. Menzoberranzan (PC)(RPG)
39. TimeShift (PC)(FPS)
40. Heretic Kingdoms: The Inquisition (PC)(RPG)
41. Shadowgate (PC)(Point and Click)

42. Might & Magic Book One (PC)(RPG)
43. Miasmata (PC)(Adventure)
44. Call of Juarez: Bound in Blood (PC)(FPS)
45. Legendary (PC)(FPS)
46. Hedon (PC)(FPS)
47. Last Rites (PC)(FPS)
48. Half-Dead 2 (PC)(Adventure)
49. Dishonored (PC)(Stealth Adventure)
50. Might and Magic II: Gates to Another World (PC)(RPG)

51. Dishonored: The Knife of Dunwall (PC)(Stealth Adventure)
52. Dishonored: The Brigmore Witches (PC)(Stealth Adventure)

53. The Spy Who Shot Me (PC)(FPS)
54. Z.A.R. (PC)(FPS)
55. Bunker Punks (PC)(FPS)

56. Wolfenstein: The New Order (PC)(FPS)

It's 1960, the Allies have lost World War II, the Nazis rule most of the world, and B.J. Blazkowicz is in a mental institution as a human vegetable after taking shrapnel to the back of the skull. Then the Nazis show up to kill the inmates, and guess who wakes up in time to shove a steak knife in his SS would-be killer's neck?

Ok, the Wolfenstein series has always been a big what-if with fantasy and retrofuturist technology to set it aside from more "realistic" WWII FPS series like Medal of Honor and Call of Duty. Yes, it's full of mutants, undead, time-stopping talismans, and the like. Yet somehow none of this bothers me the way Nazis on the moon in 1960 does. That just feels...insulting somehow. Sure, they're stealing technology from a proto-Jewish secret society, but that also feels insulting, so let's not focus on the ridiculous nature of the story.

Let's focus on the gunplay instead, which in general feels good. The New Order gives you a slowly expanding set of weapons, including alternate firing styles and the ability to dual wield the same types of weapons. While this doesn't let you mix and match, the dual option enables some interesting gameplay possibilities, and there are benefits and difficulties with both styles. For instance, you can't use ironsights or cover with dual weapons, but you get twice the firepower to put out walls of bullets, rockets, lazers, etc. While I tended to favor a single assault rifle, I swapped over when I felt it necessary, enabling different strategies.

If I have any complaints, I wish there was a dedicated grenade button the way there is for throwing knives. It would have made me use them more, as in general I only relied upon them for specific challenges. Yes, there are challenges to complete with the weapons which unlock benefits such as larger magazines, faster reloads, and resistance to self-harm from explosives. It's worth getting everything, but in some cases things can be tough to do, such as causing five kills due to dropped grenades from enemies.

There is also a stealth component which ties into taking down commanders and finding secrets; kill a commander in stealth, and you limit enemy reinforcements and unlock the location of hidden items on the map, though the game is not designed for stealth. You can do it, but there were times where I managed to get stealth kills when I shouldn't have, and at least once where I alerted enemies by swinging a knife in the air. No, I still don't understand how that happened. It feels like a gross oversight.

Ultimately, the firepower feels adequate for what I'm doing, and the special weapon of the game is a laser cutter that works phenomenally well when fully upgraded. Things aren't perfect, but the core is done well enough that the window dressing (which, let's face it, plot in an FPS is generally window dressing) can be glossed over. If there is a major concerning issue, it's that the game starts with a warning that it is not making any statements on Nazis being superior or glorifying them. That someone would think this terrifies me, partially because the Nazi central ideas regarding racial superiority and eugenics were so horrific, but also that I know there are people who do find these ideas attractive. Maybe not directly, but elements of a hateful and genocidal belief system are seeming resurgent, and such ideas cannot simply be defeated with space lasers and assault rifle rocket launchers in a violent gloss of sex and sanitized violence.

Yeah, that's right, and I suppose that's why I find the plot problematic; there is enough reality in the fantasy, and enough fantasy in the reality that it needed a warning.

But seriously, we fought alongside most of the world to defeat this ideology in the 1940s. It should have stayed dead.
Image
Image
I have a movie review website now: https://moviereviewsbyamook.com/
User avatar
alienjesus
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 8374
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 7:10 pm
Location: London, UK.

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by alienjesus Mon Dec 23, 2019 1:37 pm

Games Beaten 2019:
First 50:
1. Super Smash Bros. Ultimate Switch
2. Alex Kidd in The Enchanted Castle Switch
3. Streets of Rage Switch
4. Vectorman Switch
5. Galaxy Force II Switch
6. Flicky Switch
7. Phantasy Star 2 Switch
8. Sonic the Hedgehog Switch
9. Altered Beast Switch
10. ESWAT: City Under Siege Switch
11. Columns Switch
12. Virtua Fighter 2 Switch
13. Kirby Star Allies Switch
14. Katamari Damacy Reroll Switch eShop
15. Pokémon: Let's Go, Eevee! Switch
16. Octodad: Dadliest Catch Switch eShop
17. Sword of Vermilion Switch
18. Decap Attack Switch
19. Golden Axe Switch
20. The Revenge of Shinobi Switch
21. Beyond Oasis Switch
22. WarioWare Gold 3DS
23. Shining in the Darkness Switch
24. Kid Chameleon Switch
25. Streets of Rage 2 Switch
26. Bio-Hazard Battle Switch
27. Super Thunder Blade Switch
28. Gain Ground Switch
29. Phantasy Star III: Generations of Doom Switch
30. Sonic the Hedgehog 2 Switch
31. Comix Zone Switch
32. Vectorman 2 Switch
33. Light Crusader Switch
34. Crack Down Switch
35. ToeJam and Earl Switch
36. Dynamite Headdy Switch
37. Golden Axe II Switch
38. Shadow Dancer: The Secret of Shinobi Switch
39. Columns III: Revenge of Columns Switch
40. Shining Force: The Legacy of Great Intention Switch
41. Kirby No Kirakira Kizzu Game Boy
42. Klonoa Wii
43. Looney Tunes Collector: Martian Alert! GBC
44. Mario Tennis N64
45. Fire Emblem Warriors Switch
46. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time [Randomiser] N64
47. The New Zealand Story SMS
48. Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana Switch
49. Shenmue 2 Dreamcast
50. Castlevania GBA

51. Mario Party N64
52. ActRaiser SNES
53. GoldenEye 007 N64
54. Mom Hid My Game Switch eShop
55. Money Puzzle Exchanger Switch eShop
56. Gunbird Switch eShop
57. Tokyo School Life Switch eShop
58. Musynx Switch
59. Gremlins 2: The New Batch NES
60. Subsurface Circular Switch eShop
61. Yoshi's Woolly World Wii U
62. ToeJam & Earl: Panic on Funkotron Switch
63. Bare Knuckle III Switch
64. Gunstar Heroes Switch
65. Space Harrier II Switch
66. Sonic Spinball Switch
67. Phantasy Star IV: The End of the Millennium Switch
68. Sonic 3D Blast Switch
69. Rabbids Go Home Wii
70. Alien Storm Switch
71. Alien Soldier Switch
72. Untitled Goose Game Switch eShop
73. Landstalker: The Treasures of King Nole Switch
74. Fatal Labyrinth Switch
75. Ristar Switch
76. Golden Axe III Switch
77. Shinobi III: Return of the Ninja Master Switch
78. Dr. Robotnik's Mean Bean Machine Switch
79. Bonanza Bros. Switch
80. Shining Force II [& Sega Mega Drive Classics] Switch
81. Castlevania Bloodlines Switch eShop
82. Puyo Puyo Sun 64 N64
83. Chameleon Twist 2 N64
84. Cruis'n USA N64
85. Darkwing Duck Game Boy
86. Fortified Zone Game Boy
87. Lock 'N Chase Game Boy
88. Spanky's Quest Game Boy
89. Looney Tunes Collector: Martian Revenge! GBC
90. Puchi Carat PS1
91. Battle Garegga Rev. 2016 PS4
92. Flower PS4
93. FlOw PS4
94. The Longest 5 Minutes Switch
95. West of Loathing Switch
96. Pokémon Sword Switch
97. Moero! Nekketsu Rhythm Damashii Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan 2
98. Ace Attorney Investigations: Prosecutor's Path
99. Game Center CX: Arino no Chōsenjō 2



Moero! Nekketsu Rhythm Damashii Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan 2

Image

I got married earlier in the year, and me and my wife went to Japan on our honeymoon. Whilst I was there I picked up a handful of games, including all 3 of the games I’m posting reviews of now. Ouendan 2 was the only one of these games I didn’t need to find a fan translation to play, as it’s generally easy enough to follow without one – it’s a rhythm title where the story is relatively minimal, often told with pictures as well as dialogue, and where it’s not too important to be able to follow it to have fun.

Image

If you’ve played Elite Beat Agents on DS, you know exactly what to expect. EBA is kind of a half remake/half sequel to the original Ouendan on DS, and this title takes a lot of the improvements Elite Beat Agents made and applies them back to Ouendan, then adds new story and songs – it’s more of the same, basically. And that’s no bad thing, because I love Ouendan/EBA.

Image

You play along with a selection of licensed tracks – in this case they’re all obviously Japanese, so they were all unfamiliar to me. This added some extra challenge as I didn’t know the songs as well, but it wasn’t really a major obstacle. As you play, notes pop up on screen numbered 1,2, 3 etc, and you must tap them in order along with the beat as circles close in on them. As well as the standard tap the touchscreen notes, you also have hold notes where you must follow along a path with the stylus, and spinners which require you to spin as fast as possible to get more points.

Image

The story of Ouendan involves a cheer squad who cheer people on to help them overcome various challenges in their life. Each challenge is told via a comic book style sequence and they cover a wide range of scenarios – many of the ones in Ouendan 2 are particularly Japanese though, with things like Ryokan owners and Sumo wrestlers being amongst those you help. Songs are broken down into 3-5 sections, each of which tell of another step to overcoming the hurdles presented – performing well in a section and finishing above 50% health (health drops with each miss and can fall fast on harder songs, but is replenished by doing well) helps the person achieve success, but a bad performance will show them failing, normally in a slightly comical way. Finishing the song with all successes shows the best outcome, but finish with one or more failures shows a partial success. Failing the song obvious gives a bad outcome.

Image

The main issue with Ouendan 2 is it’s length – there are only about 20 songs in the game, and it takes just a few hours to play through them on normal difficulty if you’re good. There’s an easy mode too, and unlockable hard and extra hard difficulties too, but it’s still a short experience – the replayability is mainly centred on mastering the harder difficulties and increasing your score on each level.

Image

But that’s fine, because Ouendan 2 offers everything it needs to and everything you expect of it. The gameplay is fun, the soundtrack is generally enjoyable and bouncy, and the story is silly and hammy but charming throughout. I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend Ouendan 2, or really any game in the series, to anyone who enjoys a rhythm game or 2. It’s great.





Ace Attorney Investigations: Prosecutor’s Path

Image

I’ve been a big fan of the Ace Attorney games for years now, and a personal favourite of mine was Ace Attorney Investigations: Miles Edgeworth, the final release on the original DS. Or at least the final release in the west – over in Japan, there was a sequel to Ace Attorney Investigations. Unfortunately, due to the late release on the system, and probably the costs of localisation and distribution, Capcom elected not to bring this final DS swansong westwards. Luckily enough for me though, some very talented individuals have taken it upon themselves to translate the game into English, and so I was able to enjoy it after all.

Image

And a remarkable job they’ve done too – it’s hard to tell this wasn’t done by the usual translation team. They’ve managed to localise the game faithfully, acknowledging all of the ‘definitely set in America’ weirdness of the canon localisation whilst also faithfully conveying the intricacies of the source material.

Image

Like the original AAI game, this game eschews the usual courtroom drama of the series to focus purely on the investigation component on the game. This is somewhat deceptive though – in reality the core gameplay is still very similar – you find evidence and present it to expose contradictions in peoples stories, press witness testimonies and all the other usual components of the core series. The main difference in reality is the pacing – whereas the usual story focuses on large portions of investigating the crime scene followed by large sections of cross-examination in court, the Investigations series jumps back and forth between the 2 more frequently, and in my opinion, feels better paced as a result.

Image

Story wise, this game picks up after the first Mile Edgeworth game, and explores Miles Edgeworth’s decision on whether he should continue to follow the Prosecutor’s Path or change his focus for his future. The game has a selection of great cases, which at first seem distinctly disconnected from one another – a presidential assassination attempt, a murder at a prison, a case from Greg Edgworth’s past, and more – and then eventually, a case that surprisingly manages to pull it all together for a great conclusion. I’d hesitate to call it the high point finale of the series – there’s definitely been better ones in the series. But the overall quality of each case is phenomenal, and this is my new vote for the potential best of the series.

Image

Prosecutor’s Path features a lot of references and tributes to past games in the series, with many returning cast members from past cases in the series, although it also features many new and likeable (and hateable) characters. I wouldn’t recommend it as a first game in the series for new players despite it’s quality because it really is improved by prior knowledge of the series, but it’s still absolutely excellent quality overall. If you’re a fan of the series, this is a real must play.





Game Center CX: Arino no Chosenjo 2

Image

Game Center CX for the DS is a game based on a Japanese TV show where the host, Arino, attempts to complete a variety of old games in one sitting. Arino is renowned for not being especially good at games, but the show has a kind of infectious enthusiasm and a delightfully low budget to it and has become a bit of a cult favourite – even here in the west where people dedicate themselves to translating each episode into English. And similarly, they have dedicated themselves to translating this game too.

Now the first game in the series was actually officially translated and localised to the US under the name Retro Game Challenge. Both games are made up of a variety of mini games, designed to look, play and feel like a game that would have been released in the 80s or 90s, but all original creations. You play through various challenges on each game to progress, unlocking more games as you go, as well as a variety of gaming magazines which offer hints, tips and tricks for the games in question. Each game also includes a manual in game which can be read for details of how to play, and the localisation of both the official and fan translated releases is solid and authentic to the time period.

Being as the game treats each mini-game as if it was it’s own release, I will do that same here and provide mini-reviews for each title:

Image

Wizman: Wizman is a genuinely great Pac-man clone where you play as the titular wizman. Red and blue gems litter the maze, and you can only pick up each crystal by first acquiring the respective coloured wand. Grabbing multiple wands of the same colour speed you up, and with each wand you can cast a few spells to attack enemies – white enemies are weak to either the red or blue wands, but red and blue enemies need hit with the opposite colour. Each level also contains hidden gold wands unlocked in a variety of secretive methods (think Bubble Bobble or Tower of Druaga for example) which are weaker but allow you to pick up any gem and attack any enemy. This one is very enjoyable, and had it released on NES or Game Boy for real I’d call it a hidden gem.

[img]https://i.ytimg.com/vi/vaqpCsyzjgc/hqdefault.jpg
[/img]
Mutekiken Kung Fu – This one is a pastiche of the likes of Karateka, with you walking left and punching enemies as they approach. You can find secret warps by punching certain spots in the air. You can also combo enemies to send them flying into each other, which releases icons you can collect to fill the Mu-Te-Ki-Ken meter, which when full grants you invincibility. Boss fights appear which are fought in a fixed arena, International Karate+ style, with you turning to face your opponent when you jump on them. This isn’t a favourite of mine, but it does feel like an authentic take on the inspirations.

Image

Demon Returns – This is the iconic platformer of the game, and it takes inspiration from the likes of Mario, Ghosts n Goblins and Adventure Island. You play as a demon who can slash with his claws. You start small, but grabbing power ups makes you large and then grants a projectile, Mario style. Being hit shrinks you back down. You can slash enemies and then jump on them to ride them, kind of like the skateboard in advanture island – you can double jump from these rides too for extra height. You also can find secret warps, and must grab apples to keep your hunger meter filled – it depletes over time. This one is a solid game, but perhaps not up to the heights of it’s inspirations, mainly due it feeling less focused than those games due to it’s myriad of ideas from other games.

Image

Detective Kacho 1 & 2 – This is actually 2 games, rather than 1, but like similar games on the NES they’re actually all one continuous story with the same gameplay, so I’ll combine them too. This is a text adventure game where the Arino is tasked with solving the 7 mysteries of the office, and you assist him. All of the NPCs in the game are figures from the TV show or from Bandai Namco’s development staff. Unfortunately, this one isn’t a favourite, as the story feels a little inconsistent, and although faithful, there are too many awkward solutions that don’t really make sense and a lack of direction. Neither of these are a favourite.

Image

Gun Duel – Gun Duel is a shmup in the vain of Star Soldier or the Aleste games – you can obtain multiple different weapons and equip one as a primary and one as a secondary fire – each weapon has different effects depending which weapon position it is in, but you can swap at any time. The game is fast paced and fun, and is a personal highlight of the selection for me. In 2 player (which can be played with CPU) you also gain the ability to merge your ships after grabbing a certain power up, combining your firepower to become even stronger.

Image

Triotos – This is a tetris knock-off which is designed to appear as if it’s a GB game. Making matches of icons will make them disappear, and you can trigger special effects by making complete horizontal rows, creating combos or deleting 6 blocks at once. I personally don’t really like this one – the puzzle mechanics feel a bit underdeveloped and the game is unfortunately not that interesting over all

Image

Guadia Quest Saga – This one is a sequel (actually supposedly the third game in the series) to the game Guadia Quest from the first game. This one is meant to be a Game Boy Colour RPG, and it’s very old-school. The game features 3 playable characters who can capture monsters to use in battle. It obviously has some pokemon inspiration, but most battles are fought by your own party and in honesty this feels more like it draws it’s inspiration from Dragon Quest 2. This one is a bit grindy and repetitive, as 8 bit RPGs are known to be, but it’s enjoyable in it’s own way, and surprisingly challenging.

Image

Super Demon Returns – This is supposedly the 16-bit sequel to the first Demon Returns. Mechanically it’s very similar to the first game, but with a few tweaks. Overall it’s more of the same though. It does look better as you’d expect, but I don’t really feel like they pulled off the SNES look very well, unlike their 8 bit games.

There’s a bunch of other versions of games from the first title here too, as well as a game boy colour variant of Triotos. There’s plenty to see and do here, and the game is all pretty decent. The actually progression through the main game is somewhat flawed - the challenges are more like tutorials for each title, and the games unlock sequentially after finishing all challenges meaning you’ll restart them over and over which can be tedious. But once you’re through and have free range to play what you want, this is a pretty decent time. Worth a play.
Image
User avatar
MrPopo
Moderator
 
Posts: 23112
Joined: Tue Aug 26, 2008 1:01 pm
Location: Orange County, CA

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by MrPopo Mon Dec 23, 2019 9:11 pm

First 50:
1. Octopath Traveler - Switch
2. Dusk - PC
3. Forsaken Remastered - PC
4. Tales of Eternia - PS1
5. Resident Evil 2 (2019) - PC
6. Pokémon Trading Card Game - GBC
7. Metro Exodus - PC
8. Thronebreaker: The Witcher Tales - PC
9. Project Warlock - PC
10. Magic: The Gathering - PC
11. Ghost 1.0 - PC
12. Call of Duty 2 - PC
13. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice - PS4
14. Revelations: The Demon Slayer - GBC
15. Mechstermination Force - Switch
16. Shadow Warrior Classic Redux - PC
17. Lost Sphear - Switch
18. Warcraft II: Beyond the Dark Portal - PC
19. Dragon Quest III - NES
20. Rage 2 - PC
21. Blood - PC
22. Harvest Moon 64 - N64
23. Battlefield V - PC
24. Sigil - PC
25. Shining Force III: Scenario 2 - Saturn
26. Shining Force III: Scenario 3 - Saturn
27. Borderlands 2: Commander Lillith and the Fight for Sanctuary - PC
28. Gato Roboto - Switch
29. Timespinner - Switch
30. Amid Evil - PC
31. Pillars of Eternity II: Beast of Winter - PC
32. Pillars of Eternity II: Seeker, Slayer, Survivor - PC
33. Pillars of Eternity II: The Forgotten Sanctum - PC
34. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night - Switch
35. Orphan - PC
36. Project Nimbus - PC
37. Hardcore Mecha - PC
38. Grey Goo - PC
39. Giants: Citizen Kabuto - PC
40. Wolfenstein: Youngblood - PC
41. Fire Emblem: Three Houses - Switch
42. Metal Wolf Chaos XD - PC
43. Ion Fury - PC
44. Final Fantasy Adventure - GB
45. Astral Chain - Switch
46. Rebel Galaxy Outlaw - PC
47. Blasphemous - Switch
48. Daemon x Machina - Switch
49. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening - Switch
50. Borderlands 3 - PC

51. Valfaris - Switch
52. Unreal: Return to Na Pali - PC
53. The Outer Worlds - PC
54. MechWarrior 4: Black Knight - PC
55. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare - PC
56. Deus Ex: Mankind Divided: System Rift - PC
57. MDK - PC
58. Pokémon Sword - Switch
59. Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order - PC
60. Blazing Chrome - Switch
61. MDK 2 - PC
62. Heavy Gear - PC
63. Virtual-On - Saturn
64. Virtual-On: Oratorio Tangram - DC
65. MechWarrior 5: Mercenaries - PC
66. Metaltech: Earthsiege - PC
67. Earthsiege 2 - PC

Earthsiege 2 is the same game as Earthsiege. Though it now runs on Windows, the only real upgrade to the game is that the terrain now has levels. So instead of a flat plane with blocking hills on it you now have canyons and hills to climb. This instantly makes the game a bit more interesting, as now you have to account for enemies coming at you from different points and you 100% need to use your turret tilt now.

The other new thing the game adds (other than the obvious slightly better weapons and new mech chasses that can mount extra guns) is a plane. And the plane, frankly, sucks. The two good things that can be said about it are it's amazing for recon missions that have no kill requirement (as you just merrily fly from waypoint to waypoint without anything being able to touch you) and it apparently can fly on the moon as if it were in atmosphere.

It's a bit harder to run on a modern system than the first game; initially dxwnd was working for me, then that decided to randomly not work and I needed to include in dgvoodoo as well. You might be able to get away with just dgvoodoo, but I had the problem of really bad overscan. I seem to get overscan problems on any game that renders in 640x480 and nothing I can do fixes it, so I had to stick with dxwnd to window it. And then that decided to stop accepting the window size I want and went for something slightly smaller.

The verdict on Earthsiege 2 is if you liked the first you'll like this, and if you didn't like the first you won't like this. Because it's the same damn game.
Image
Games Beaten: 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Blizzard Entertainment Software Developer - All comments and views are my own and not representative of the company.
User avatar
TheSSNintendo
128-bit
 
Posts: 535
Joined: Mon Jul 11, 2011 10:27 pm

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by TheSSNintendo Mon Dec 23, 2019 9:16 pm

Finished Thimbleweed Park this afternoon.
Return to General Gaming

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests