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MrPopo
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by MrPopo Sun Aug 22, 2021 5:56 pm

Previous Years: 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

First 50:
1. EYE: Divine Cybermancy - PC
2. Legend of Grimrock - PC
3. Legend of Grimrock 2 - PC
4. Shovel Knight - Wii U
5. Yakuza: Like a Dragon - PS4
6. Yoshi's Island - SNES
7. Vectorman 2 - Genesis
8. Super Mario Sunshine - GC
9. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time Master Quest - GC
10. Bomberman '93 - TG-16
11. Cannon Fodder - PC
12. Panzer Dragoon II Zwei - Saturn
13. Dragonborne - Game Boy
14. Rock n' Roll Racing - PC
15. The Lost Vikings - PC
16. Blackthorne - PC
17. Contra III: The Alien Wars - SNES
18. Bravely Default II - Switch
19. Axelay - SNES
20. Ryse: Son of Rome - XBOne
21. Killer Instinct (2013) - XBOne
22. Heretic Kingdoms: The Inquisition - PC
23. Thief: The Dark Project - PC
24. Killer Instinct - XBOne
25. Killer instinct 2 - XBOne
26. Record of Lodoss War: Deedlit in Wonder Labyrinth - PC
27. Thief 2: The Metal Age - PC
28. Wing Commander II - PC
29. Wing Commander III - PC
30. The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel IV - Switch
31. Shadow Man Remastered - PC
32. Wing Commander: Privateer - PC
33. Salt and Sanctuary - Switch
34. The Elder Scrolls: Arena - PC
35. The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall - PC
36. Resident Evil Village - PC
37. SaGa Frontier Remastered - Switch
38. Metaloid: Origin - Switch
39. SaGa Scarlet Grace: Ambitions - Switch
40. Metro Exodus: The Two Colonels - PC
41. Metro Exodus: Sam's Story - PC
42. Panzer Paladin - Switch
43. Returnal - PS5
44. Dark Void Zero - DSiWare
45. Panzer Dragoon Saga - Saturn
46. Magic Knight Rayearth - Saturn
47. Cathedral - Switch
48. Final Fantasy VII Remake: INTERmission - PS5
49. Eterium - PC
50. A Street Cat's Tale - Switch

51. Bug Fables: The Everlasting Sapling - Switch
52. Banner of the Maid - Switch
53. CrossCode - Switch
54. Total Annihilation: The Core Contingency - PC
55. Ultima Underworld - PC
56. Betrayal at Krondor - PC
57. Assassin's Creed: Origins - PC
58. Axiom Verge 2 - Switch
59. Elderborn - PC
60. Hellbound - PC
61. Wargroove - Switch
62. Eye of the Beholder - PC
63. Quake: Dimension of the Past - PC
64. Quake: Dimension of the Machine - PC

To celebrate Nightdive's remaster of Quake MachineGames created another episode that would be distributed with the remaster (which everyone who already owned Quake on Steam got free upgraded to). While Dimension of the Past was Quake, but more, Dimension of the Machine really tries to inject modern level design sensibilities into the engine, creating much longer and more intricate levels that will test your fortitude and skill.

The episode is divided into five sets of two levels, where you get a rune from the second level and then escape through a portal. Once all five runes are collected you can open the final level for the Cthon boss fight. Each of the sets has a distinct theme, and the levels use all new assets (or at least, assets that aren't just the idBase/Temple/Runic of base Quake) to create some really nice looking and more importantly varied levels.

I mentioned they are longer; a base Quake level is 30-60 monsters and takes 5-10 minutes. The levels in Dimension of the Machine are 100-170 monsters and take 20-30 minutes to get through. The levels are BIG, with lots of doubling back to collect keys and make your way to the end, not to mention various traversal hazards. The overall sensibility is derived from Half-Life's style of levels; there are even segments designed to show off monster infighting while you sit in safety (and then when you move forward another shambler shows up to ruin your day). It's really fun to see Quake gameplay in a different style of level, and the levels themselves are tons of fun.

The final fight against Cthon is more interesting than the base game but it's still mostly an exercise in never stopping moving around the circle to not get plastered by his fireballs. This time you get a Thunderbolt that you can use to send him into the lava and focus on the enemies spawning around you; every time you finish a wave you unlock more of the area, and unlocking all of the arena lets you escape. There's no real satisfying gibbing of Chton.

While Dimension of the Past has a few rough edges I think Dimension of the Machine really realizes what MachineGames is capable of doing with Quake, and it is a very worthwhile playthrough.
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by elricorico Mon Aug 23, 2021 6:37 pm

1. Cosmic Star Heroine (NS)
2. Boom Blox (Wii)
3. Grandia (NS)
4. New Super Mario Bros. (NDS)

5. Moss (PSVR)


I finished Moss on the Playstation 4 last night. Moss was one of the first PSVR games I played on the demo disc that came with my hardware, and I got the full game free earlier this year when Sony was giving out some of their games.

Moss is like playing through a fairy-tale children's book, where you are both the "reader" and control the hero, who happens to be a mouse. Mostly a puzzle platformer with a bit of combat throughout. Not terribly difficult, but the combat does get a little more challenging in parts. The puzzles are generally simple with just a few that took some tinkering to figure out.

The world is beautifully made and the story is pretty good. Suitable for quite young children, but engaging enough to keep adult attention.

The game did suffer a little bit in the controls. It really seemed to need an almost perfect room for PSVR - large enough and dark enough as you need to do some reaching with the controller for certain puzzles and it could get finicky. I also had a few deaths due to some difficulty with depth perception on some jumps. Not enough to really discourage, but some minor moments of frustration when you know what to do but can't get the controls to cooperate.

The ending implies the coming of a sequel, which I believe was just officially announce recently. I wouldn't mind visiting this world again. This is probably my 3rd favourite experience with PSVR so far, after Astro Bot and Thumper.
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MrPopo
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by MrPopo Mon Aug 23, 2021 7:36 pm

Previous Years: 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

First 50:
1. EYE: Divine Cybermancy - PC
2. Legend of Grimrock - PC
3. Legend of Grimrock 2 - PC
4. Shovel Knight - Wii U
5. Yakuza: Like a Dragon - PS4
6. Yoshi's Island - SNES
7. Vectorman 2 - Genesis
8. Super Mario Sunshine - GC
9. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time Master Quest - GC
10. Bomberman '93 - TG-16
11. Cannon Fodder - PC
12. Panzer Dragoon II Zwei - Saturn
13. Dragonborne - Game Boy
14. Rock n' Roll Racing - PC
15. The Lost Vikings - PC
16. Blackthorne - PC
17. Contra III: The Alien Wars - SNES
18. Bravely Default II - Switch
19. Axelay - SNES
20. Ryse: Son of Rome - XBOne
21. Killer Instinct (2013) - XBOne
22. Heretic Kingdoms: The Inquisition - PC
23. Thief: The Dark Project - PC
24. Killer Instinct - XBOne
25. Killer instinct 2 - XBOne
26. Record of Lodoss War: Deedlit in Wonder Labyrinth - PC
27. Thief 2: The Metal Age - PC
28. Wing Commander II - PC
29. Wing Commander III - PC
30. The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel IV - Switch
31. Shadow Man Remastered - PC
32. Wing Commander: Privateer - PC
33. Salt and Sanctuary - Switch
34. The Elder Scrolls: Arena - PC
35. The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall - PC
36. Resident Evil Village - PC
37. SaGa Frontier Remastered - Switch
38. Metaloid: Origin - Switch
39. SaGa Scarlet Grace: Ambitions - Switch
40. Metro Exodus: The Two Colonels - PC
41. Metro Exodus: Sam's Story - PC
42. Panzer Paladin - Switch
43. Returnal - PS5
44. Dark Void Zero - DSiWare
45. Panzer Dragoon Saga - Saturn
46. Magic Knight Rayearth - Saturn
47. Cathedral - Switch
48. Final Fantasy VII Remake: INTERmission - PS5
49. Eterium - PC
50. A Street Cat's Tale - Switch

51. Bug Fables: The Everlasting Sapling - Switch
52. Banner of the Maid - Switch
53. CrossCode - Switch
54. Total Annihilation: The Core Contingency - PC
55. Ultima Underworld - PC
56. Betrayal at Krondor - PC
57. Assassin's Creed: Origins - PC
58. Axiom Verge 2 - Switch
59. Elderborn - PC
60. Hellbound - PC
61. Wargroove - Switch
62. Eye of the Beholder - PC
63. Quake: Dimension of the Past - PC
64. Quake: Dimension of the Machine - PC
65. Legends of Amberland: The Forgotten Crown - Switch

Legends of Amberland is a cute indie retro RPG that is essentially Might and Magic 3 (and 4 and 5) dressed up with decades of learnings about smooth gameplay to give us a short but satisfying RPG that scratches that itch without getting bogged down in its own self-importance. The game knows what it is and doesn't try to be anything else.

The plot is pretty straightforward; the royal wizard sends you on a quest to find a crown that has been placed under a curse of forgetfulness; only one obscure library entry indicates it even exists, so clearly there must be something more going on here. In order to find the crown you'll need to scour the land, solving quests, beating monsters, and leveling up.

As mentioned, the game starts off with the gameplay of Might and Magic 3, but then strips out mechanics that didn't pull their weight and added in a bit of quality of life features. Gameplay is grid based and features a fixed number of monsters wandering the world; upon encountering one you go into turn based combat. Combats will features between one and three enemies and replacements can join defeated enemies, so be careful of where you engage. Smash them with swords, cast spells at them, and keep yourself healed. You'll get a wide variety of sidequests that provide useful experience and reward you for exploring every dungeon and talking with every NPC (fortunately there aren't a lot of them; the towns are menus).

In terms of changes, they removed the ranged option that did little except get you fucked over by enemy spells and they made turn order and party targeting priority far more explicit. You have seven characters and you can imagine them as being in a V formation. The middle character acts first and is most likely to be targeted, followed by the two on each side, then the two on the sides of them, then the last two on the ends. Turn order is absolute and never changing, so arrange your party based on that. Enemies will then engage at fixed points in this turn order; it will always be in between pairs (or between the middle character and the first pair). Difference enemies will sit in different spots of this overall order, but they always will get a total of two moves.

The game also features a special ability each character can use once per rest. This is based on your character class, but they all serve as an augmented form of whatever they primarily do. So melee guys do more damage, casters do big heals/SP restore, and hybrids will get one of the two based on if they are melee focused or spell focused hybrids. As mentioned, you can use one per rest for each character. You can take either a short rest (couple hours) which only restores some health and your specials or a long rest (eight hours) which fully heals. Each uses its own supply of food and you can only carry three of each, so there is some resource management in your dungeon dives. You also need to manage the fact that the powerful party buffs reset at midnight, so take care when resting.

The game is extremely approachable, though near the end game the quest text gets a bit obtuse, especially if you forget that the in game help (hover over/button depending on platform) gives you a fair amount of detail on things like quest details or item stats. As long as you remember that things come down to you properly managing your combats and leaving no stone unturned.

If you've never played an old school CRPG before this is a perfect entry to the genre; they don't get more approachable than this while staying true to the fundamental design of the titles of yore. Give it a shot, and if you like it consider playing some of the classics.
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prfsnl_gmr
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by prfsnl_gmr Mon Aug 23, 2021 9:23 pm

Really fun game. Perfect review, popo! I’m glad you enjoyed it!
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PartridgeSenpai
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by PartridgeSenpai Tue Aug 24, 2021 3:36 am

Partridge Senpai's 2021 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
* indicates a repeat

Games 1~51
1. Atelier Rorona: The Alchemist of Arland (PS3)
2. Portal 2 (PC) *
3. Atelier Judie: The Alchemist of Gramnad (PS2)
4. Pipo Saru 2001 (PS2)
5. Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon (N64)
6. Atelier Viorate: The Alchemist of Gramnad 2 (PS2)
7. Kirby's Dream Land 3 (SFC)
8. The Legend of Mystical Ninja (SFC)
9. Atelier Marie: The Alchemist of Salburg (PS1)
10. Ganbare Goemon 2 (SFC)
11. Paper Mario: Origami King (Switch)
12. Star Fox 64 (N64) *
13. Super Paper Mario (Wii) *
14. Paper Mario: The Thousand Year Door (GC) *
15. Demon's Crest (SNES)
16. Cathedral (Switch)
17. Super Mario 3D World (Switch) *
18. Bowser's Fury (Switch)
19. Rogue Heroes: Ruins of Tasos (Switch)
20. moon (Switch)
21. Casltevania 64 (N64)
22. Captain Rainbow (Wii)
23. Doraemon: Nobita To Mittsu No Seireiseki (N64)
24. Blast Corps (N64)
25. Doraemon 2: Nobita To Hikari No Shinden (N64)
26. Custom Robo (N64)
27. Doraemon 3: Nobita No Machi SOS! (N64)
28. 64 Trump Collection: Alice No Wakuwaku Trump World (N64)
29. The Sunken City (PS4)
30. Lair of the Clockwork God (Switch)
31. Star Fox Adventures (GC)
32. Atelier Elie: The Alchemist of Salburg 2 (PS1)
33. Billy Hatcher & The Giant Egg (GC)
34. Mole Mania (GB)
35. Gargoyle's Quest (GB)
36. Rock Man 4 (Famicom) *
37. Wai Wai World (Famicom)
38. Mega Man: Dr. Wily's Revenge (GB)
39. Mega Man (Switch) *
40. Mega Man 2 (Switch) *
41. Mega Man 3 (Switch) *
42. Rock Man 5 (Famicom) *
43. Mega Man 6 (Switch)
44. Mega Man 7 (Switch) *
45. Mega Man 8 (Switch) *
46. Mega Man 9 (Switch) *
47. Mega Man 10 (Switch)
48. Rock Man World 2 (GB) *
49. Rock Man World 3 (GB)
50. Rock Man World 4 (GB)
51. Rock Man World 5 (GB)

52. Wai Wai World 2 (Famicom)
53. Tiny Toon Adventures (Famicom)
54. King Kong 2: Ikari No Megaton Punch (Famicom)
55. Yume Pengin Monogatari (Famicom)
56. Rock Man & Forte (SFC)
57. Rock Man X2 (Switch)
58. Rock Man X3 (Switch)
59. Rock Man X4 (Switch)
60. Rock Man X5 (Switch)
61. Rock Man X6 (Switch)
62. Rock Man X7 (Switch)
63. Rock Man X8 (Switch)
64. Mega Man: Powered Up (PSP)
65. Magical Taruruuto Kun: FANTASTIC WORLD!! (Famicom)
66. Maken Shao (PS2)
67. Getsu Fuuma Den (Famicom)
68. Rock Man D.A.S.H (PSP)
69. Brave Fencer Musashi (PS1)
70. Joe & Mac (SFC) *
71. Atelier Lilie: The Alchemist of Salburg 3 (PS2)
72. Zelda 2: The Adventure of Link (Famicom)
73. The Bouncer (PS2)
74. Rapid Angel (PS1)
75. Atelier Totori: The Alchemist of Arland 2 (PS3)
76. Drakengard 3 (PS3)
77. Alwa's Awakening (Switch)
78. Hermina & Culus (PS2)
79. Atelier Meruru: The Alchemist of Arland 3 (PS3)
80. Splatterhouse: Wanpaku Graffiti (Switch)
81. Atelier Iris: Eternal Mana (PS2)
82. Atelier Iris: Eternal Mana 2 (PS2)
83. Mario Kart 64 (N64)
84. Super Mario Kart (SFC)
85. Mario Kart Super Circuit (3DS)
86. Legend of Zelda: The Ocarina of Time (N64) *
87. Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask (N64) *
88. Legend of Zelda: Minish Cap (3DS) *
89. Rock Man X: Command Mission (GC)

90. Pikmin (GC) *

Continuing my fervor for GameCube stuff during GameCube month, I hunted down an old favorite of mine~. It's been only a few years since I beat Pikmin, but that was on Wii. It's been a loooooong ol' time since I've played it on GameCube, and this seemed like as good a time as ever ^w^. Playing the Japanese version of the game, it took me about 6 or 7 hours to get all 30 ship parts in 19 in-game days.

Pikmin is the story of Captain Olimar, a pint-sized astronaut who crash-lands on a mysterious Earth-like planet. However, for Olimar, our precious oxygen is very toxic, and he only has 30 days to repair his ship before he does a big die. Thankfully, he has the help of eager and easily controlled little plant-like aliens: the Pikmin! The game is quite light on both story and premise outside of Olimar's logs, but they more than do the job of what the game needs for its narrative.

The mechanics and design of Pikmin are where it's at. Using Olimar, you can control your red (immune to fire and better fighters), yellow (can carry bombs and be thrown higher), and blue (don't drown in water) Pikmin to help you do everything from fight giant monsters to building bridges to destroying destructible walls. You can have 100 Pikmin out at a time, and you grow more by having them retrieve the bodies of monsters they kill and bringing them back to their little Onion homes. IF they are allowed to grow in the ground longer or find nectar to drink while they're out and about, the leaves on their heads will grow into buds and then flowers, allowing them to move more quickly.

The combat isn't super technical, and mostly just revolves around using red Pikmin (whenever possible, at least) to strategically maneuver around your large and often slow and lumbering opponent to hit their weakpoint until they're dead (while avoiding getting eaten yourself). You have 30 days to collect 30 ship pieces, and while it isn't the biggest time crunch in the world, it can certainly be stressful, so time management is the name of the game. Pikmin is a game more about gameplay and atmosphere than deep technical strategies. It's such a short game, in fact, that it even has scoreboards for how many Pikmin you had die, how long you took to get the ship pieces, how many Pikmin you grew, etc.. This makes it more of a time-attack challenge, in the long-run, and is definitely a game made with multiple playthroughs in mind.

That said, it isn't a game without flaws. Most of the issues I have with the game come from the Pikmins' AI, which can be very capricious at times. Certain objects such as little crust on the ground or grasses will hide nectar within them, and if a Pikmin passes by it at all (whether you directed them to or not), they will stop what they're doing to try and get the nectar. Additionally, Pikmin aren't the best runners, and they can trip fairly frequently, so waiting for your little guys to catch up with you is an annoyance that often eats up a fair bit of time. There are also issues with larger Pikmin swarms not packing together very nicely and leading to cases where they end up getting caught on rocks or falling off of bridges, leading to unintentionally leaving them behind or drowning just because you weren't paying attention enough. Admittedly, a lot of these things are bigger problems when viewed in the context of the sequel which fixes basically all of those problems in one way or another (sometimes AI fixes, sometimes via level design), but they're still annoyances here one way or the other.

The presentation is as excellent as you'd expect from a Nintendo first-party title. The Pikmin, Olimar, and all the creatures are unique and adorable in their own ways, and the world design really gives a great impression of being around an inch tall~. The music is also excellent, and adds to the atmosphere very nicely.

Verdict: Highly Recommended. It may be a bit on the short side and rough around the edges, but Pikmin still holds up excellently. I'll always prefer its sequel, but the whole nature of the smaller world and time management aspects make Pikmin 1 unique from its successors in a way that I think is still worth appreciating.
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Ack
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by Ack Tue Aug 24, 2021 11:08 am

1. Frog Detective 2: The Case of the Invisible Wizard (PC)(Adventure)
2. Revulsion (PC)(FPS)
3. Nonogram - Master's Legacy (PC)(Puzzle)
4. Sekiro (PC)(Action-Adventure)
5. Grim Dawn (PC)(Action RPG)
6. Grim Dawn: Ashes of Malmouth (PC)(Action RPG)
7. Grim Dawn: Forgotten Gods (PC)(Action RPG)

8. Viscera Cleanup Detail: Santa's Rampage (PC)(FPS)
9. Viscera Cleanup Detail: Shadow Warrior (PC)(FPS)
10. Shrine (PC)(FPS)
11. Record of Lodoss War - Deedlit in Wonder Labyrinth (PC)(Adventure)
12. Forgotten Realms: Demon Stone (PC)(Action)
13. Red Alliance (PC)(FPS)
14. The Forest (PC)(Horror)
15. Pixel Puzzles: Japan (PC)(Puzzle)
16. 12 is Better Than 6 (PC)(Top Down Shooter)
17. Torchlight II (PC)(RPG)

18. An Elder Scrolls Legend: Battlespire (PC)(RPG)
19. Port of Call (PC)(Walking Sim)

20. NeonCode (PC)(Walking Sim)
21. Carrion (PC)(Adventure)
22. Dr. Langeskov, The Tiger, and The Terribly Cursed Emerald: A Whirlwind Heist (PC)(Walking Sim)
23. Helltaker (PC)(Puzzle)
24. Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor - Martyr (PC)(RPG)

25. Castlevania: Bloodlines (Switch)(Platformer)
26. Treachery in Beatdown City (Switch)(RPG)
27. Zeno Clash (PC)(Action)
28. Borderlands: Enhanced Edition (PC)(FPS/RPG)
29. Ion Fury (PC)(FPS)

I had been following Ion Fury since the days it had the name Ion Maiden before a certain British band got upset and forced a change. But when the game released, I played through the first episode and set it aside. Why? Well, I had been going for 100% and missed one enemy along the way, and that frustrated me, so I needed a break...which ended up lasting a while. However, due to recent stresses in my life, I felt I needed to come back to shoot something in the face, and Ion Fury delivered.

It is the future. You are a super cop. There is a mad scientist with an army of cyborgs and mutants. You need to kill them all. Enough said.

Ion Fury is a cyberpunk FPS made in the Build Engine. Yes, the same engine that brought us Duke Nukem 3D, Shadow Warrior, and Blood. And much like those, Ion Fury is full of a trash talking hero slinging movie lines just as much as bullets and bombs. Unfortunately, where it falls apart is not really understanding its major influences. Duke Nukem 3D was an action movie blockbuster that referenced those kinds of films with it's auditory and visual gags. Shadow Warrior was a problematic send up in Kung Fu and Yakuza movies. Blood was horror films. Ion Fury pulls from science fiction...but it is also just as likely to spout Die Hard lines, make references to Hellraiser, and throw in the odd location from Twin Peaks or Silent Hill 4. This is jarring, because it feels like a lack of understanding on what made the big Build Engine games so referential. It would have been better served sticking to science fiction and cyberpunk classics.

Where it gets things right is in level design. Ion Fury levels are long, well crafted, and interesting. There are tons of secrets, tons of things to blow up, lots of challenging enemies with differing attacks that never feel cheap, and set pieces which run the gamut of cyberpunk, with the occasional nod to other genres in singular levels. Corporate offices, seedy bars, narrow alleys, sewers, military warehouses, and secret labs make up your battlefields. These levels are chock full if vents and shortcuts found by blasting apart the walls or opening up locked doors to enable easy backtracking.

Weapons also feel appropriate for the theme. Yes, they fit the mold of pistol, shotgun, smg, grenade, etc. But they do so in a way that feels futuristic. Your pistol? It fires basic shots but also has a lock on feature. Your shotgun? Can also be fitting with grenade rounds. Your minigun is literally ripped off the side of a mech, while your melee weapon is an electrified night stick. Do I feel like a super cool in a cyberpunk future with this gear? Oh Hell yeah. While there is perhaps an overreliance on explosives, it never feels like the levels of masochism found in Blood either, and the game manages to keep all weapons relevant throughout, a rare feat in an FPS.

Ion Fury also has a chapter design that groups levels but enables to player to revisit, so you can try for all secrets and killing all enemies. Sometimes this can be frustrating, as secrets are very well hidden, and some of the flying enemies like to buzz off beyond the normal map boundaries. But if you want to just explore, you have a great opportunity.

Overall, I had a great time with Ion Fury, and I recommend it to other fans of '90s FPS. It's a modern take that succeeds in a marketplace full of retro FPS these days. Go play it. And talk shit, get shot.
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prfsnl_gmr
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by prfsnl_gmr Tue Aug 24, 2021 9:51 pm

First 35
1. Horace (Switch)
2. Ghostrunner (Switch)
3. Mickey’s Adventure in Numberland (NES)
4. Mickey’s Safari in Letterland (NES)
5. Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse (Genesis)
6. The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess Picross (3DS)
7. World of Illusion starring Mickey & Donald (Genesis)
8. Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse (Game Gear)
9. Land of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse (Game Gear)
10. Legend of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse (Game Gear)
11. Portal 2 [co-op] (PS3)
12. Operencia: The Stolen Sun (Switch)
13. The Knight of Queen (Switch)
14. Q.U.B.E. - Director’s Cut (PS3)
15. What the Golf?! (Switch)
16. Prune (iOS)
17. Kenshō (iOS)
18. For the Frog the Bell Tolls (GameBoy)
19. Holedown (iOS)
20. King’s Field (PS1)
21. My Friend Pedro (Switch)
22. MO: Astray (Switch)
23. EQI (Switch)
24. Foxyland (Switch)
25. Carrion (Switch)
26. QUBE 2 (Switch)
27. Aaero (Switch)
28. Portal 2 (PS3)
29. Alwa’s Awakening (Switch)
30. Alwa’s Legacy (Switch)
31. Mega Man 11 (Switch)
32. Superliminal (Switch)
33. Shantae & The Seven Sirens (Switch)
34. Halo 3 (360)
35. Legacy of the Wizard (NES)

36. Robo Warrior (NES)
37. Blaster Master Boy (GB)
38. Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Tipping Stars (3DS)
39. Donkey Kong Land (GB)
40. Mario & Donkey Kong: Minis on the Move (3DS)
41. Streets of Rage 4 (Switch)
42. Steamworld Dig 2 (3DS)


I recently spent a good bit of time completing Mario & Donkey Kong: Minis on the Move, and I still stand by my positive review a few pages back. Only after completing the game entirely did I realize just how much content is contained in that game. It took a couple of hours to roll the credits, but completing every puzzle extended the game to JRPG lengths. :lol:

I also recently beat Streets of Rage 4. I played do-op with my son, and we crushed the game on “normal” difficulty. (We’ve actually beaten Streets of Rage, Streets of Rage II, Streets of Rage 3(!), and Bare Knuckle III together; so, we’re a pretty mean combination at this point.) The game is fantastic, and we loved it. I anticipate us spending a lot more time with it so we can unlock everything.

Steamworld Dig 2, like Steamworld Dig, is like a cross between Dig Dug and Metroid. You dig through dangerous mines, finding new abilities, and gathering resources to purchase upgrades. The game emphasizes exploration and resource management much more than combat and platforming, and it’s tremendous fun. Moreover, the game has a great steampunk old-West atmosphere, a great personality, a strong soundtrack, and stupendous sound design. I loved the first game, but the sequel is even better. I should have played this game years ago, and I really can’t recommend it or it’s predecessor highly enough.
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by MrPopo Wed Aug 25, 2021 12:29 am

Previous Years: 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

First 50:
1. EYE: Divine Cybermancy - PC
2. Legend of Grimrock - PC
3. Legend of Grimrock 2 - PC
4. Shovel Knight - Wii U
5. Yakuza: Like a Dragon - PS4
6. Yoshi's Island - SNES
7. Vectorman 2 - Genesis
8. Super Mario Sunshine - GC
9. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time Master Quest - GC
10. Bomberman '93 - TG-16
11. Cannon Fodder - PC
12. Panzer Dragoon II Zwei - Saturn
13. Dragonborne - Game Boy
14. Rock n' Roll Racing - PC
15. The Lost Vikings - PC
16. Blackthorne - PC
17. Contra III: The Alien Wars - SNES
18. Bravely Default II - Switch
19. Axelay - SNES
20. Ryse: Son of Rome - XBOne
21. Killer Instinct (2013) - XBOne
22. Heretic Kingdoms: The Inquisition - PC
23. Thief: The Dark Project - PC
24. Killer Instinct - XBOne
25. Killer instinct 2 - XBOne
26. Record of Lodoss War: Deedlit in Wonder Labyrinth - PC
27. Thief 2: The Metal Age - PC
28. Wing Commander II - PC
29. Wing Commander III - PC
30. The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel IV - Switch
31. Shadow Man Remastered - PC
32. Wing Commander: Privateer - PC
33. Salt and Sanctuary - Switch
34. The Elder Scrolls: Arena - PC
35. The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall - PC
36. Resident Evil Village - PC
37. SaGa Frontier Remastered - Switch
38. Metaloid: Origin - Switch
39. SaGa Scarlet Grace: Ambitions - Switch
40. Metro Exodus: The Two Colonels - PC
41. Metro Exodus: Sam's Story - PC
42. Panzer Paladin - Switch
43. Returnal - PS5
44. Dark Void Zero - DSiWare
45. Panzer Dragoon Saga - Saturn
46. Magic Knight Rayearth - Saturn
47. Cathedral - Switch
48. Final Fantasy VII Remake: INTERmission - PS5
49. Eterium - PC
50. A Street Cat's Tale - Switch

51. Bug Fables: The Everlasting Sapling - Switch
52. Banner of the Maid - Switch
53. CrossCode - Switch
54. Total Annihilation: The Core Contingency - PC
55. Ultima Underworld - PC
56. Betrayal at Krondor - PC
57. Assassin's Creed: Origins - PC
58. Axiom Verge 2 - Switch
59. Elderborn - PC
60. Hellbound - PC
61. Wargroove - Switch
62. Eye of the Beholder - PC
63. Quake: Dimension of the Past - PC
64. Quake: Dimension of the Machine - PC
65. Legends of Amberland: The Forgotten Crown - Switch
66. Anopek - PC

Anopek is a cute little exploration FPS done in the visual style of the Catacomb 3-D games. Where it innovates is in the weaponry; specifically the alternate functions used for mobility. It's fairly short and not too difficult, but the game has charm.

The game takes inspiration from the gameplay loops of metroidvanias; you're initially restricted to a small area of the map and are able to get further and further with the mobility your weapons provide you. The weapons follow the standard FPS model of pistol, shotgun, rocket launcher, railgun, rocket launcher, and minigun. But almost all of them (minus the pistol) have an alternate fire used for mobility. The shotgun lets you move over acid, the rocket launcher knocks down walls, the railgun lets you phase through grates, and the minigun lets you phase through mirrors (and the geometry is designed such that the opposite side of the mirror is a mirror of where you were, so maybe it's actually a window and a second player spawned). The game has a total of eight bosses which are actually fairly interesting for FPS bosses; half of them have puzzle elements and the other half have bullet hell elements.

Like I said, it's short. I finished the game in under two hours, which means I was constantly getting a new upgrade or fighting a new boss, so it is a very compressed experience that serves as a few bites of Ben & Jerry's to tide you over. I'd say it's a bit content light for it's $7 price tag, but on discount it's a fun experience.
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PartridgeSenpai
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by PartridgeSenpai Wed Aug 25, 2021 4:21 am

Partridge Senpai's 2021 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
* indicates a repeat

Games 1~51
1. Atelier Rorona: The Alchemist of Arland (PS3)
2. Portal 2 (PC) *
3. Atelier Judie: The Alchemist of Gramnad (PS2)
4. Pipo Saru 2001 (PS2)
5. Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon (N64)
6. Atelier Viorate: The Alchemist of Gramnad 2 (PS2)
7. Kirby's Dream Land 3 (SFC)
8. The Legend of Mystical Ninja (SFC)
9. Atelier Marie: The Alchemist of Salburg (PS1)
10. Ganbare Goemon 2 (SFC)
11. Paper Mario: Origami King (Switch)
12. Star Fox 64 (N64) *
13. Super Paper Mario (Wii) *
14. Paper Mario: The Thousand Year Door (GC) *
15. Demon's Crest (SNES)
16. Cathedral (Switch)
17. Super Mario 3D World (Switch) *
18. Bowser's Fury (Switch)
19. Rogue Heroes: Ruins of Tasos (Switch)
20. moon (Switch)
21. Casltevania 64 (N64)
22. Captain Rainbow (Wii)
23. Doraemon: Nobita To Mittsu No Seireiseki (N64)
24. Blast Corps (N64)
25. Doraemon 2: Nobita To Hikari No Shinden (N64)
26. Custom Robo (N64)
27. Doraemon 3: Nobita No Machi SOS! (N64)
28. 64 Trump Collection: Alice No Wakuwaku Trump World (N64)
29. The Sunken City (PS4)
30. Lair of the Clockwork God (Switch)
31. Star Fox Adventures (GC)
32. Atelier Elie: The Alchemist of Salburg 2 (PS1)
33. Billy Hatcher & The Giant Egg (GC)
34. Mole Mania (GB)
35. Gargoyle's Quest (GB)
36. Rock Man 4 (Famicom) *
37. Wai Wai World (Famicom)
38. Mega Man: Dr. Wily's Revenge (GB)
39. Mega Man (Switch) *
40. Mega Man 2 (Switch) *
41. Mega Man 3 (Switch) *
42. Rock Man 5 (Famicom) *
43. Mega Man 6 (Switch)
44. Mega Man 7 (Switch) *
45. Mega Man 8 (Switch) *
46. Mega Man 9 (Switch) *
47. Mega Man 10 (Switch)
48. Rock Man World 2 (GB) *
49. Rock Man World 3 (GB)
50. Rock Man World 4 (GB)
51. Rock Man World 5 (GB)

52. Wai Wai World 2 (Famicom)
53. Tiny Toon Adventures (Famicom)
54. King Kong 2: Ikari No Megaton Punch (Famicom)
55. Yume Pengin Monogatari (Famicom)
56. Rock Man & Forte (SFC)
57. Rock Man X2 (Switch)
58. Rock Man X3 (Switch)
59. Rock Man X4 (Switch)
60. Rock Man X5 (Switch)
61. Rock Man X6 (Switch)
62. Rock Man X7 (Switch)
63. Rock Man X8 (Switch)
64. Mega Man: Powered Up (PSP)
65. Magical Taruruuto Kun: FANTASTIC WORLD!! (Famicom)
66. Maken Shao (PS2)
67. Getsu Fuuma Den (Famicom)
68. Rock Man D.A.S.H (PSP)
69. Brave Fencer Musashi (PS1)
70. Joe & Mac (SFC) *
71. Atelier Lilie: The Alchemist of Salburg 3 (PS2)
72. Zelda 2: The Adventure of Link (Famicom)
73. The Bouncer (PS2)
74. Rapid Angel (PS1)
75. Atelier Totori: The Alchemist of Arland 2 (PS3)
76. Drakengard 3 (PS3)
77. Alwa's Awakening (Switch)
78. Hermina & Culus (PS2)
79. Atelier Meruru: The Alchemist of Arland 3 (PS3)
80. Splatterhouse: Wanpaku Graffiti (Switch)
81. Atelier Iris: Eternal Mana (PS2)
82. Atelier Iris: Eternal Mana 2 (PS2)
83. Mario Kart 64 (N64)
84. Super Mario Kart (SFC)
85. Mario Kart Super Circuit (3DS)
86. Legend of Zelda: The Ocarina of Time (N64) *
87. Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask (N64) *
88. Legend of Zelda: Minish Cap (3DS) *
89. Rock Man X: Command Mission (GC)
90. Pikmin (GC) *

91. Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures (GC) *

This is a game I wasn't really planning on replaying or rebuying any time soon, but then I found it in very nice condition for a whopping 300 yennies, so into the playlist for GameCube month it went! X3. It's a game I've beaten a time or two before and played with friends on several occasions, but that was so long ago I'd forgotten just about everything about this game. It took me about 8 or so hours to complete the Japanese version of the game by myself.

Four Swords Adventures is the Nintendo-made follow up (of sorts) to the extra Four Swords multiplayer mode Capcom put into their GBA port of Link to the Past several years before. Rather than just a handful of levels, this is a whole game designed for four Links to partake in as they fight to save Hyrule from the evil wizard Vaati. The story is very light for a Zelda game outside of simple plot exposition, but most of the text is dedicated to light flavor text or just explaining what to do in each stage, and the writing that is there does a good job of explaining things and being as entertaining as it needs to be. And that's right, you read that right. This is a Zelda game with stages. You play through eight worlds of three stages each trying to get to the end of it to complete your exceptionally linear adventure. Granted that isn't a bad thing, as this is a fairly necessary concession to make for the sake of the multiplayer, which is this game's main draw.

This is an adventure for four Links, and you can control them by yourself or you can have up to three other friends take control of them. Playing by yourself or with any number other than four people, you can use the C-stick or hold Y to access fixed formations for your Links to walk in to achieve different environmental puzzles or take on particular enemies or bosses that demand more spread out or compact formations (such as walking in a horizontal line to push a large block or form an offensive wall to take on oncoming enemies). The only real downside to this is that playing with any number of friends is a pretty significant investment in equipment, as each player needs their own GBA and link cable to the GameCube to play (as you go into a personal sub-screen to go into sub-areas of a larger area). You don't need that to play alone, but it's a pretty unfortunate obstacle in experiencing what's otherwise a pretty damn impressive and unique multiplayer experience.

If you imagine a Zelda game with all of the fluff known as "adventure" taken out and boil it down to a more linear approach to the usual puzzle solving and enemy fighting, then that's what you've got here. The combat arenas and the sheer emphasis on the number of enemies in combat are a little unorthodox for a 2D or 3D Zelda, sure, but it fits really well into the multiplayer format this game is designed around. Stages have an impressive diversity of being more combat, platforming/exploring, and puzzle focused, and that leads to always feeling like you're doing something different. Some of the puzzle focused stages are a little *too* puzzle-y for my liking (both as a kid and as an adult there were a few solutions I had to look up on my own), but perhaps they're mean to be harder because you're intended to have four heads thinking up solutions rather than one XD. At any rate, it really pays to pay attention to what NPCs tell you, as they often given rather crucial hints to solving the puzzles in your way and are almost always there to do more than simply add flavor text.

The presentation is a very wild thing, even in the context of Zelda in the mid-2000's. You have a 2D game that feels a lot like the original Four Swords game, but the presentation is this weird mish-mash of Link to the Past-like and Minish Cap-like environments combined with a lot of NPCs (and bosses) plucked straight out of Wind Waker (though they're obviously different characters within the universe of the game). They do a really cool job of converting what were once 3D boss fights into 2D ones, and it overall gives the game a very eclectic feeling in how it's presented. The music is also excellent, but it's also by and large remixes of existing Zelda tracks, just to add one more onto the pile of how much of a delightful mish-mash of Zeldas this game feels.


Verdict: Recommended. This is definitely more highly recommended if you have friends to play with, but just as a solo game, it's simply quite good. It really won't set your world on fire, but it's nonetheless a really neat and unique game by any measure, particularly for the time. Definitely one worth spending a weekend on if you can find it for the right price, even if you don't have friends to enjoy it with~.

----

92. Far East of Eden 2: Manjimaru (GC)

This is a seminal game for the PC-Engine that I've wanted to get to playing for a long time, and I've actually bought three different times (this being the third). Once on PSN, once via my PCE Mini, and then this GameCube port that Hudson put out exclusively in Japan in the middle of the GameCube's life (as they did with so many other franchises of theirs). I've always known of this as the sort of Mother series of the PC Engine: a Dragon Quest-clone that's well remembered not for its mechanics but for its memorable presentation, setting, and characters. Granted this isn't exactly that iconic original version, and it has quite a few quality of life improvements from that original version on top of its graphical overhaul, it's still quite the faithful port. It took me about 50 hours or so to beat the game (which is a pretty impressive final time, given this game has virtually no side-content and I only spent a couple hours grinding and another couple being lost at several points).

Far East of Eden 2 is the story of its subtitle's character, Manjimaru, and takes place in the Japan-parodying fictional country of "Jipang" (a parody of Japan as imagined by modern Japanese through the lens of how 19th century Westerners imagined Japan to be). The descendant of the legendary Fire Clan who sealed away darkness a thousand years ago, he must follow in his ancestor's footsteps and join up with other Fire Clan members to seal away the dark Root (like those of a plant) Clan once again. It's overall a pretty straightforward story, but it made up for it at the time with some really impressive anime-style animated cutscenes and tons of voice acting for them in addition to major story moments (all of which have had their quality bumped up a bit but otherwise been left more or less totally unchanged for this remake). There are a few moments that present themselves as more serious, but it's more often a sort of comedy than anything else.

Although those more serious moments go HARD when they come around or go by basically untouched upon. One of my biggest criticisms with the game is the way it so poorly maintains a sense of tone or decency in regards to its comedy and seriousness. There is some incredible tonal whiplash over the game's eight or so chapters (which aren't really chapters so much as they are just incremental "YOU DID THE THING!" of which there are 8, so I call them chapters :b). You go from a super silly transformation fight cutscene in the middle of chapter 2 to later that chapter getting full VA and animated character portraits as a family is slowly dissolved into the man-eating forest. You get to watch as silly, lovable side characters are brutally executed one by one in cruel and narratively cheap ways that just feels so trashy every time it's done.

This also easily holds the new mantel for the most shockingly homophobic/transphobic game I've ever played, not only having it's very bluntly gay-coded villain both be an animal abuser, but also very heavily implied (they stop the adventure to directly repeat it to you several times) to be both a pedophile and into bestiality. While the funny moments did make me genuinely laugh out loud several times, I think this game's writing has too easy a tendency to use human suffering and triggering topics like sexual assault as lazy plot dressing to do no more than gratuitously drive home how evil the villains are. It's overall aged like fine milk and is trash better left in the dustbin of history.

Mechanically, it's really just Dragon Quest but more annoying, more often than not. The combat is DQ save for just how needlessly overly complicated and confusing the UI is (SO many menus that don't need to be there or could be condensed into less boxes), it's first-person combat encounters, you have a party of four. The more annoying parts take shape in not only the bad menus (which have been improved for the GC port but are still very annoying) but also your absolutely puny character-specific inventories which hold anywhere from nine to a mere three items (depending on the character) and each character only being able to hold six equipment items (four of which are the equipment they're presently wearing). The game has had its leveling system at the very least made a bit higher, as my party's level of mid-80's was way higher than the PCE-version guide's recommended levels of several dozen levels lower, although it's difficult for me to gauge just how much of that is actual rebalancing or if they just made the same growth curve spread out over more levels. Granted even if that were the case, you do get significantly more powerful in even a level up or two, and you thankfully get a full heal with every level up, which is also nice.

There are a few more notable changes from the typical DQ formula present in the early 90's. One of the most important is how spells work. Each character does have their own special, unique skills that they learn as they level up and require no mana. However, I found these skills to be too situational at best and utterly worthless at worst (I barely ever used them). The actual magic spells come in the form of scrolls that you acquire by visiting huts of tengu spread all over Jipang. Many spells can only be used by certain characters, but the spells themselves can be passed around between party members freely. While it does mean that you only get one copy of each spell at maximum, it also provides interesting opportunities for strategy in who gets what spells and when, especially in a game with small inventory space, no item stacking, and very limited options when it comes to mana restoration that isn't via sleeping at an inn.

At least it *would* present more interesting opportunities for strategy if the game were balanced and designed a bit better. On the balancing front, the game is designed much more on the easier side. I'm not sure if that's a reality of rebalancing done for the GC port or if it's a reflection of how things were in the PCE original as well, but regardless of the cause that was the reality of my playthrough. It's pretty easy save for certain brutal difficulty spikes, particularly through the entirety of chapter 4 as well as the final boss gauntlet. Thankfully, however, this is the rare early 90's game (or at least a port of one) without true game overs, as you simply get kicked back to the last big inn you stayed at when you die, just like Pokemon. It also thankfully (even in the PCE original) is kind enough to show you remaining enemy health, which makes it one of a very few number of games from that era to do so, at least in my experience.

The other large mechanical problem is that spells by and large just kinda suck. The only stats in the game are attack, defense, and speed. While I think magic attack IS some stat that exists, it's not one you can see or affect visibly through equipment (This is part of a larger problem of very poor player information that's been lovingly preserved from the PCE port, in that you're never told what passives equipment has or what items do, but that's a totally separate problem). Offensive spells are often too weak to bother using as soon as you get them, and even then, they're far too expensive to warrant using in the first place compared to healing spells. Simply just attacking things until they die with normal attacks and using the MP you do have for healing up afterwards is a strategy that will get you through virtually the entire game save for a small handful of boss fights where using buffs or debuffs can prove useful. Not TOO useful, however, as buffs and debuffs wear off very quickly and need to be reapplied every so often (when they go away seems to be entirely up to RNG). It's a game whose combat system is both overly complicated and also lacking any and all depth, and that winds up making it difficult to understand AND boring to engage with at the same time, which is a fascinating achievement in and of itself, in a way.

The GameCube port's biggest changes are in the realm of presentation, but also in a small amount of quality of life features, most significant of which is the mini-map (which also has the added bonus of showing town, dungeon, and tengu hut locations on maps!). All cutscenes have been preserved in content but had their resolutions increased significantly, and the same goes for the voice overs, so far as I can tell anyway. It also makes the menus a little easier to navigate and the text far easier to read. To lean harder into the "old Japan" theme, the game uses a lot of old lexicon and obsolete names and kanji for things even in the PCE version. That made the PCE version's tiny 16-bit kanji very hard to understand for me, and the poorer audio quality didn't help me understand the subtitle-less cutscenes any better either. They still don't have subtitles for those cutscenes (something I find MUCH harder to forgive in 2003 than it was in 1992), but the text is far easier to read and the menus are a bit easier to navigate and understand. It's still very clunky, but it's better than it was at least.

The presentation of this version as a whole is very good. Enemy design is super diverse, with the game's dozens of areas having a huge amount of monster sprites which are only reused twice at most (very impressive for the time, to be sure). The enemies and bosses all get small animations to how they move, giving them a bit more life than their PCE counterparts had. The music also ranges from good to excellent, really flexing the power of remixed tracks that were also just good all around to begin with. The biggest sticking point for people will likely be the new graphics style, which blends 2D character sprites (and entirely 2D first-person perspective fights) with 3D environments. I thought they looked nice, but that has been one of the most divisive elements of the presentation when I've shown the game to friends (both retro-loving and otherwise).


Verdict: Hesitantly recommended. This game overall holds up okay, but really only in the context of being a DQ-clone from 1992. I think it really outstays its welcome with trashy, bad writing and a really dull combat system that extend over a run time that's at least ten hours too long, but for those of you who like more simple older games like this, that might be just your cup of tea. It isn't outright bad, but it's a difficult game to return to that I don't think stands up all that well even for when it was released (outside of the notable presentation aspects). I'm glad I have some experience with the series now to speak about it firsthand, but honestly, outside of historical curiosity like I had, I think this is a game best left ignored for better contemporaries of early 90's JRPGs, even in its improved GameCube format.
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by Gunstar Green Wed Aug 25, 2021 1:30 pm

1. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening (Switch Remake)
2. Super Mario Maker 2
3. Super Mario Odyssey
4. New Super Mario Bros. U DELUXE
5. Daemon X Machina
6. Turrican
7. Turrican 2: The Final Fight
8. SUPERHOT
9. Untitled Geese Game
10. Mega Turrican
11. Super Turrican (SNES)
12. Haven
13. Gunlord X
14. Super Mario 3D World
15. Bowser's Fury
16. Cathedral
17. Super Robot Wars T
18. Ninja Saviors - Return of the Warriors
19. Raiden V
20. Quake: Dimension of the Past

So I wasn't going to get into the Quake Remaster any time soon but a buddy gifted it to me on PC. First and foremost I have to say, it's an excellent package for playing Quake in the modern day and if you're a console gamer who has never experienced Quake but are interested in retro first person shooters at all, it's a must have. Just like Doom before it we can expect a lot of curated custom content to be making its way to consoles as well which will be a lot of fun.

On to the expansion itself. Popo already covered most of my feelings so I'll be brief. I played through most of the pack when it came out but didn't finish it despite thinking it was pretty good so now I wanted to put it to rest.

I think as its intended goal, a 5th episode of the original Quake, it works pretty well with the exception of the final level not being terribly climactic, though it is extremely difficult. My favorite levels are the first few before you travel to the other dimension as it offers some of the best, often underused, tech base levels for the original Quake with hordes of human enemies to mow down. This was something I also enjoyed about the old expansion, Scourge of Armagon. It's fast, frantic and fun. Y'know... like Quake.

The later levels slow down with lots of ambushes and as Popo mentioned, deadly traps, which will cause you to take corners much more cautiously. You're frequently ammo-starved so intelligent weapon switching in the middle of a fight is essential to make sure you save the big guns for when you really need them, and you will really need them with the amount of shamblers and vores they hit you with in the late game. I imagine it would be rough on console for this reason. It really tests your understanding of your arsenal.

Overall it's well made as you'd expect from professional level designers. It's just as cruel as Sandy Peterson's late game levels though with a better understanding of aesthetic design. It can be unfair at times with the traps but it's nothing that will have you pulling your hair out. The shamblers might though.
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