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LOGICHACK
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by LOGICHACK Tue Mar 23, 2021 1:03 am

REPO Man wrote:
LOGICHACK wrote:Found it.

Also, I notice that when I pause the game the tanks reappear and if I collect them, regardless of the number of tanks I've already collected, it's possible to not being able to fix any of the generators.

Anyone else here try it?

Ah thank you! never noticed that before, I'll have to fix that before the next release.
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PartridgeSenpai
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by PartridgeSenpai Tue Mar 23, 2021 8:38 pm

Partridge Senpai's 2021 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
* indicates a repeat

1. Atelier Rorona: The Alchemist of Arland (PS3)
2. Portal 2 (PC) *
3. Atelier Judie: The Alchemist of Gramnad (PS2)
4. Pipo Saru 2001 (PS2)
5. Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon (N64)
6. Atelier Viorate: The Alchemist of Gramnad 2 (PS2)
7. Kirby's Dream Land 3 (SFC)
8. The Legend of Mystical Ninja (SFC)
9. Atelier Marie: The Alchemist of Salburg (PS1)
10. Ganbare Goemon 2 (SFC)
11. Paper Mario: Origami King (Switch)
12. Star Fox 64 (N64) *
13. Super Paper Mario (Wii) *
14. Paper Mario: The Thousand Year Door (GC) *
15. Demon's Crest (SNES)
16. Cathedral (Switch)
17. Super Mario 3D World (Switch) *
18. Bowser's Fury (Switch)
19. Rogue Heroes: Ruins of Tasos (Switch)
20. moon (Switch)
21. Casltevania 64 (N64)
22. Captain Rainbow (Wii)
23. Doraemon: Nobita To Mittsu No Seireiseki (N64)
24. Blast Corps (N64)
25. Doraemon 2: Nobita To Hikari No Shinden (N64)

26. Custom Robo (N64)

I borrowed the GameCube Custom Robo from a friend as a kid and really enjoyed it, but I'd only ever heard about the N64 game. This Japan-exclusive first entry in the series is one that I scored ages ago, but only got to playing recently as something I did on Twitch. I was super out of practice and had forgotten most about the GameCube game, but things slowly came back to me as I went through it. It's definitely a first step rather than some inspired peak of the series, but I had a good bit of fun with it~. It took me around 8 hours to beat it over the course of two streams.

Custom Robo tells the story of you, the main character, who has just moved into a new town. Your cousin happens to live here, and he's a big fan of this new toy craze of Custom Robo. A "Commander" pilots the robos by "diving" their consciousness into the toy and battling other their opponents robot for who can KO their opponent's robot first. Lucky for you, your parents have gotten you your very own Custom Robo toy as a present for the move, and you get right to work as your cousin teaches you how to play. You turn out to be a prodigy as you go basically undefeated through every opponent you come across, winning every tournament their is and even saving the world from a Team Rocket-like evil.

It's a story that's very typically anime for the time, and it gave me very Pokemon and Yu-Gi-Oh vibes between the relationship the main character has with his family, friends, and even the villains. It's got some really weird pacing and twists at times, and it's hardly gonna set your world on fire, but it's mostly here to give a set dressing for the robot fighting, and it does a more than good enough job at that. At the very least, you'll probably get some giggles from just how campy and expressive the characters' expressions can be when they're emoting their dialogue X3

The gameplay is very much like a prototype for what would eventually be the English-released GameCube game. The two robos launch into different directions from the center of the map, and then your cubes morph into the robots who then begin to fight. You fire your main weapon with A, fire your bomb with B, launch pods with Z, and can jump and boost with R. You can even use a C button to dash towards your opponent eliminating their normal fire coming towards you. There are all sorts of different main guns, bombs, and pod types you can get as you play through the story, and even different legs for your unit to affect things like how long it takes you to start moving again once you hit the ground and how fast your acceleration is. You can tweak your build a ton in the story mode, and there's a ton of skill present in how you can play.

The only major complaint I'd have is that the action feels a bit too clunky/slow at times compared to how the GC version can feel. While that isn't a death sentence, it does mean that you can get punished REALLY hard if you happen to misstep, and the harder battles in the game can very quickly turn against you if you make a couple mistakes. While the game isn't really super hard and the AI is far from the best, the last fights of the penultimate and final in-game days are both super tough, and really drive home just how hard you can punish an unready opponent. I found the challenge quite nice, overall, at least for someone like me who is quite unaccustomed to fighting games, let alone in a 3D fighting genre like this ^^;

Other more minor complaints are things like how you can't change the build of your robot in the story mode. There is an arcade mode you can basically play however you want in, but you're stuck using the all-around fine Ray model in the story mode. Different Custom Robo models have different recovery times, can get knocked down easier or harder, and even have higher defense values and different base speeds. You end up fighting a ton of opponents (there are like ten or so different models in the game), and it becomes a little bit of a bummer that your robo is always just plain ol' Ray (unlike how you can change that in later games).

My only other significant complaint is that a fair few of the weapons in the game aren't just tactical decisions, but are clearly better than others. While that power creep does favor the story mode well (especially for a game this old with no online play and a fully functional arcade mode), it's still a little bit of a bummer for how the fighting itself is designed. It makes it feel like more of an RPG and less like a fighting game, which isn't a fault, per se (it honestly probably made me like it more), but it's definitely something worth mentioning here.

The presentation is about what you'd expect for a Nintendo-published game on the N64 in 1999. Colors and models are really colorful and vibrant, and the game runs really well. The music is also quite good, although there's nothing particularly MP3 player-worthy in my book. Just how cool so many of the other robo models can look made me even more bummed that you're stuck playing as Ray all the time. I wanted to look a that cool too! X3

Verdict: Recommended. This is a pretty darn good game on the N64, especially for a system that is so barren of any competent fighting games (save for a few exceptions). While it's certainly an untraditional fighting game, taking more from something like Virtual On rather than Street Fighter, it's a very competent one. While the sheer amount of text will likely keep any non-Japanese speaker thoroughly confused and unable to play the story mode, the arcade mode can still be enjoyed to a point even if you don't know Japanese. It's certainly navigable with the use of a guide, and it's a cheap import worth checking out if you're a fan of fighting games and neat N64 stuff.
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Note
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by Note Tue Mar 23, 2021 10:56 pm

1. Golden Axe II (GEN)
2. Time Crisis [Special Mode] (PS1)
3. Streets of Rage (GEN)
4. Time Crisis: Project Titan (PS1)
5. Rayman Origins (360)
6. Borderlands (360)
7. Streets of Rage 4 (Switch)*
8. King of Dragons (SNES)
9. Wild Guns (SNES)
10. Star Fox (SNES)
11. Guardian Heroes (SS) [2x]*
12. World of Illusion (GEN)
13. Raiden Fighters Jet (360)

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14. Raiden Fighters 2: Operation Hell Dive (360)*

I was on a shooter binge for a few weeks and was playing a lot of Seibu Kaihatsu's Raiden games. I was mostly spending time with Raiden Fighters Jet, but also decided to revisit the second game in the series, Raiden Fighters 2: Operation Hell Dive. I don't believe I ever had a chance to play this title in the arcades, so it's great to have access to the game through the Raiden Fighters Aces compilation on the 360 and catch up on what I missed back then.

In comparison to the first Raiden Fighters game, the sequel here has a lot more ships to choose from, and I really like the larger selection of ships, as it introduces the Flying Ray, which might be my new favorite ship to play as in this series. This ship has an awesome spread shot and a good speed attribute to help dodge the bullets and enemies coming your way. After clocking a lot of hours with this ship, I now prefer it to the MK-II, which was my go to.

After revisiting this series, I do think Raiden Fighters Jet is a stronger game, as the branching paths is a good motivator to really concentrate and try to get on the "good" path of levels, but Raiden Fighters 2 is also a fun game containing a complex scoring system which adds to the replay value, and a variety of ships with different weapons and speeds, which also adds to the variety for the player. Also, co-op is a fun bonus in Raiden Fighters 2 and I look forward to when I can enjoy it with a friend again.

If you have the chance to pick up this compilation or to play Raiden Fighters 2 using another method, definitely give it a shot. I still think the Raiden games while tough, are a good entry point into the shoot 'em up genre. Give this one a go, if you haven't yet!
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by Note Wed Mar 24, 2021 12:15 am

1. Golden Axe II (GEN)
2. Time Crisis [Special Mode] (PS1)
3. Streets of Rage (GEN)
4. Time Crisis: Project Titan (PS1)
5. Rayman Origins (360)
6. Borderlands (360)
7. Streets of Rage 4 (Switch)*
8. King of Dragons (SNES)
9. Wild Guns (SNES)
10. Star Fox (SNES)
11. Guardian Heroes (SS) [2x]*
12. World of Illusion (GEN)
13. Raiden Fighters Jet (360)
14. Raiden Fighters 2: Operation Hell Dive (360)*

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15. Streets of Rage 3 (GEN)

The Streets of Rage series is my favorite beat 'em up series, with the second game being my obvious favorite. Back when Streets of Rage 3 was released, I didn't give it much of a fair chance. I didn't care for the additions of Zan and Roo, the color swaps, and I recall not even liking the box art at the time. After renting the game, I was also mixed on the gameplay as the added difficulty made a casual co-op session with a friend less fun and I felt that the music was a step down. But a few years ago, I tracked down the English translated version of Bare Knuckle III, finished that version, and came to enjoy the game in its original form.

After playing and finishing the first two games and now the fourth game in the series so many times, I felt like spending some more hours on the third game, the title I've played the least in the series. Except this time around, I wanted to play the US version with all the changes by Sega of America. Even though I still don't care for a lot of the changes to the game, over time, I've come to appreciate this title much more, especially the grittier and darker vibe.

The graphics are a mixed bag in SOR3, the character sprites and character animations look to be more detailed and we do get cut scenes between levels, which is a nice touch, even though Sega of America adjusted the plot to be pretty corny. However, the level designs and backgrounds lack much parallax scrolling or animation, which is too bad. We also see a few of the same backgrounds, such as the elevator and battle with (robot) Mr. X, which look to be borrowed from SOR 2.

Regarding the soundtrack, when I first heard the soundtrack to this game back in the day, I didn't really care for it, but I've started to come around to some of the music here. However, I don't think it compares to the high standard of club influenced electronic music that made up the soundtracks of the first two games. I'm a fan of Yuzo, and I think he produced a couple great songs here, but some of songs don't have much rhythm at all and sound like a mish mash of samples that don't come together well. It's a bit too experimental for my taste. I'm aware there's info out there saying he made the music using a program he coded. If that's the case, I wish he simply continued his creative process from the earlier titles.

The gameplay is where I think this title shines and where Sega did improve the game in comparison to the earlier titles. The ability to run by double tapping a direction is a good addition, and so is the roll mechanic to dodge enemies and projectiles. Also, to have a recharging bar which lets you use your special moves without losing any health is also a welcome addition. And lastly, I think the "star" system, where the more points you rack up without dying, the stronger your blitz attack gets, is a good feature and motivates the player to try to rack up points. I had a tough time keeping three stars here, but this is a fun mechanic. Another good feature is the inclusion of different endings depending on your performance towards the end of the game.

Even though I think this game is the weakest in the SOR series, it's still a better game than a lot of other beat em ups out there and worth checking out, especially if you've played the other games in this series to death, like I have. I think it's worth checking out Bare Knuckle III first, to play the game in its original form. That version with the English translation is probably the best way to play, but it's also interesting to play the US retail release to compare with all the differences and get a feel for the version we had here in the States.
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Ack
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by Ack Wed Mar 24, 2021 10:11 am

1. Frog Detective 2: The Case of the Invisible Wizard (PC)(Adventure)
2. Revulsion (PC)(FPS)
3. Nonogram - Master's Legacy (PC)(Puzzle)
4. Sekiro (PC)(Action-Adventure)
5. Grim Dawn (PC)(Action RPG)
6. Grim Dawn: Ashes of Malmouth (PC)(Action RPG)
7. Grim Dawn: Forgotten Gods (PC)(Action RPG)

8. Viscera Cleanup Detail: Santa's Rampage (PC)(FPS)

Well, kinda sorta FPS. It runs on Unreal 3, and the game takes place in the aftermath of a video game style rampage, though there is no shooting. There is mopping though. Lots and lots of mopping. The things I have seen...

Viscera Cleanup Detail: Santa's Rampage is a stand alone version of the game Viscera Cleanup Detail, in which you play a janitor who must clean up after an FPS-style massacre. That means you have to mop up blood, incinerate body parts, and dispose of bullet casing and leftover explosives. In Santa's Rampage, all of this takes a delightful Christmas theme of bloody violence. There's gore, there's broken whiskey bottles, and there are a lot of machetes buried in elf bodies. Santa absolutely lost it.

So what do you do? Well, you incinerate it all. Mop up the blood and incinerate the bucket. Incinerate the corpses and shotgun shells. Incinerate the Christmas decorations if you feel like it too, because why not? You can absolutely cancel Christmas, so of course I did. Sorry, kiddies, but based on your letters you're a bunch of snot-nosed brats anyway.

It's all rather mind numbing and tedious, which truth be told is pretty much my personal experience having done some janitorial duties. And sometimes that tedium is simply what I want so I can mentally vent and refresh as I work. In that regard, cleaning up elf pieces and reindeer chunks is somehow therapeutic.
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by prfsnl_gmr Wed Mar 24, 2021 3:56 pm

1. Horace (Switch)
2. Ghostrunner (Switch)
3. Mickey’s Adventure in Numberland (NES)
4. Mickey’s Safari in Letterland (NES)
5. Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse (Genesis)
6. The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess Picross (3DS)
7. World of Illusion starring Mickey & Donald (Genesis)
8. Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse (Game Gear)
9. Land of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse (Game Gear)
10. Legend of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse (Game Gear)
11. Portal 2 [co-op] (PS3)
12. Operencia: The Stolen Sun (Switch)
13. The Knight of Queen (Switch)
14. Q.U.B.E. - Director’s Cut (PS3)
15. What the Golf?! (Switch)

What the Golf?! is a bizarre, frequently funny golf-inspired game in which you play as a sentient golf ball navigating some type of abandoned virtual golf laboratory. (I told you it was bizarre.)

The premise of the game is, basically: “Golf is boring unless you make other things into golf.” What follows is a barrage of short challenges linked together only by a shared “angle and power meter” video game golf mechanic. You start by hitting a golf ball at a pin...the the pin moves...or the golf ball turns into a person...or an egg...or the character in a platformer. Before the end of the game, you’re shooting horses off of trains, dodging billets, and sneaking boxes of golf balls past spotlights and lasers.

You can complete each of these challenges in a few seconds, similar to a Wario Ware game, but it nonetheless took me about nine hours to reach 100% completion. The game was a lot of fun, and despite a few incredibly frustrating challenges, I really enjoyed it. Recommended for anyone looking for something perfectly suited for short play sessions.
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by ElkinFencer10 Wed Mar 24, 2021 4:01 pm

CFFJR wrote:Elkin, are you planning to play Zero and Azure?

Are they available in English? I've not seen a Western translation.

Games Beaten in 2021 - 20
* denotes a replay

January (12 Games Beaten)
1. God of War - PlayStation 3 - January 1
2. God of War II - PlayStation 3 - January 2
3. God of War: Chains of Olympus - PlayStation 3 - January 3
4. God of War: Ghost of Sparta - PlayStation 3 - January 4
5. God of War III - PlayStation 4 - January 6
6. God of War: Ascension - PlayStation 3 - January 9
7. God of War [2018] - PlayStation 4 - January 16
8. Epic Dumpster Bear 2: He Who Bears Wins - PlayStation 4 - January 16
9. God of War: Betrayal - Mobile - January 17
10. Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit - Switch - January 18
11. Muv-Luv photonflowers* - Steam - January 22
12. Muv-Luv photonmelodies♮ - Steam - January 27


February (5 Games Beaten)
13. Gun Gun Pixies - Switch - February 1
14. Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel - PS4 - February 8*
15. Pantsu Hunter: Back to the 90s - Vita - February 13
16. Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel II - PS4 - February 17*
17. Legend of Heroes: Trails in the Sky - Steam - February 23


March (3 Games Beaten)
18. Legend of Heroes: Trails in the Sky SC - Steam - March 4
19. Legend of Heroes: Trails in the Sky 3rd - Steam - March 7
20. Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel III - PS4 - March 21


20. Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel III - PS4 - March 21

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Trails of Cold Steel III is the eagerly awaited follow-up to the incredible Trails of Cold Steel II taking place about a year later, and normally, I would have started up Cold Steel III as soon as I finished my replay of Cold Steel II, but popo said that some character from the Trails in the Sky games were in Cold Steel III and that I really needed to play those three games first to really appreciate their roles in this one. After powering through all three of the Trails in the Sky games, I finally started Cold Steel III, and pretty immediately, I saw what he meant; Tita Russel, the absolute best part of the Skies games, is a pretty significant NPC in Cold Steel III, so I'm definitely glad that I took his advice.

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If you've played the first Cold Steel, you pretty much know what to expect from Cold Steel III as far as the basic structure of the game goes. Most of it takes place at Thors Military Academy although Cold Steel III takes place at the new branch campus in Leeves, a suburb on the opposite side of Heimdallr from Trista. Rather than being a student in Sara's class, Rean himself is now the instructor of the new Class VII. On free days, Rean does the same kinds of things that he did in the first game except from the perspective of a teacher helping his students rather than a student helping his teachers. The only major gameplay difference is the "brave" orders that can be used in battle for a variety of stat boosts for a few turns and the ability to set a sub-master quartz in addition to your master quartz (which, admittedly, was probably my favorite new gameplay mechanic). Like the field studies that Rean went on as a student, the branch campus goes on field exercises with each of the classes - Class VII: Special Operations, Class VIII: Combat Tactics, and Class IX - Military Finance - doing different kinds of exercises. Class VII's Special Operations activities look suspiciously similar to the Bracer-esque things that the old Class VII did on their field studies. -insert thinking emoji-

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Over the course of their field exercises, Class VII confronts the social and political issues brought on by the fallout from the civil war, Ouroboros's continued schemes, and the Erebonian annexation of North Ambria and Crossbell. Along the way, they uncover a new insidious plot and see the effects of Erebonia's rapidly deteriorating relationship with the Republic of Calvard. In terms of the world-building the game does, it's phenomenal. The game's narrative framing is, however, very derivative. The narrative structure, progression, and whatnot in Cold Steel 3 are almost a carbon copy of Cold Steel 1 right down to the game ending with a super climactic and world-changing cliffhanger. That's not to say that it's bad - the formula they're copying is an excellent one - but it is a bit off-putting, or at least was to me, to have the third and presumably fourth game so exactly mirror the story dynamic of the first and second game. Thankfully the game's field exercises take all take place in areas that Rean didn't get to explore in the previous games, and there are plenty of new characters to get to know and interact with, so the game never feels stale, but the word "derivative" really is quite apt for the game's structure to a degree I haven't seen in any other series.

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Visually, the game looks pretty similar to the PS4 remasters of the first two Cold Steel games. The details on the models and textures are definitely improved, but it's not as dramatic an improvement as one might expect going from a PS4 remaster of a PS3 game to a game that actually made for PS4. Still, though, the game looks good, and I only encountered one noteworthy bug (plus one hilarious bug) during my roughly five dozen hour playthrough. The music is a mix of tracks familiar from the previous games and new compositions, and while I personally prefer the music from the first two games, the soundtrack is still solid, something I've noticed is the case in all of the Trails games. Likewise, the voice acting is extremely well done for the main characters; it's a little more hit-or-miss for the minor side characters. My only complaint with the voice acting is that they changed Millium's voice actress. The new VA did a great job, but it was a pretty noticeable change for me; it was a bit lower pitched and didn't have quite as memorable a "cutesy" and aloof inflection as the original VA's performance did, and those are two of Millium's core character traits. It's by no means a bad performance, but I definitely preferred the original VA.

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All things considered, Trails of Cold Steel III is another solid entry in an incredible JRPG franchise and an excellent follow-up to its predecessors. I didn't find myself quite as grasped by the characters or story in 3 as I did in 1, but that's entirely down to personal preference. If you were a fan of the other Cold Steel games, definitely play this one, but before you do, make sure you've played the three Trails in the Sky games. It doesn't matter what platform you play Cold Steel III on as there's no save data importing like there was in Cold Steel II, so if you played the first two on Vita, no worries. Likewise, if you played the first two on PS4 but want to play III on Switch, no worries there. No matter how you play it, though, make sure that you do; the Erebonian Empire's continuing trials make for a great story, and the characters from the first two Cold Steel games have matured and developed remarkably.
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prfsnl_gmr
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by prfsnl_gmr Wed Mar 24, 2021 10:47 pm

1. Horace (Switch)
2. Ghostrunner (Switch)
3. Mickey’s Adventure in Numberland (NES)
4. Mickey’s Safari in Letterland (NES)
5. Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse (Genesis)
6. The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess Picross (3DS)
7. World of Illusion starring Mickey & Donald (Genesis)
8. Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse (Game Gear)
9. Land of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse (Game Gear)
10. Legend of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse (Game Gear)
11. Portal 2 [co-op] (PS3)
12. Operencia: The Stolen Sun (Switch)
13. The Knight of Queen (Switch)
14. Q.U.B.E. - Director’s Cut (PS3)
15. What the Golf?! (Switch)
16. Prune (iOS)
17. Kenshō (iOS)


Prune is a puzzle game in which you guide plants toward a light by pruning them. It’s very peaceful and relaxing. (So peaceful and relaxing, in fact, that I forget I was playing it until I picked i up tonight and polished it off.) Success is a bit too dependent on chance, which isn’t great for a puzzle game, and I found that, even by the end, I hadn’t developed a consistent strategy for completing the game’s challenges other than”just keep trying.” Hesitantly recommended.

Kenshō is another relaxing, short match-three puzzle game. It has really great presentation and really “meh” gameplay. Mostly you slide tiles in four directions on a 5x5 grid, matching colors to clear tiles. Clearing certain tiles allows you to progress in the game. The game introduces new mechanics and obstacles every few levels, and I never really developed much of a strategy for other than “just keep sliding tiles until you get it. Still, it’s not bad, and it looks great. This one is also hesitantly recommended.
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PartridgeSenpai
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by PartridgeSenpai Fri Mar 26, 2021 6:26 pm

Partridge Senpai's 2021 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
* indicates a repeat

1. Atelier Rorona: The Alchemist of Arland (PS3)
2. Portal 2 (PC) *
3. Atelier Judie: The Alchemist of Gramnad (PS2)
4. Pipo Saru 2001 (PS2)
5. Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon (N64)
6. Atelier Viorate: The Alchemist of Gramnad 2 (PS2)
7. Kirby's Dream Land 3 (SFC)
8. The Legend of Mystical Ninja (SFC)
9. Atelier Marie: The Alchemist of Salburg (PS1)
10. Ganbare Goemon 2 (SFC)
11. Paper Mario: Origami King (Switch)
12. Star Fox 64 (N64) *
13. Super Paper Mario (Wii) *
14. Paper Mario: The Thousand Year Door (GC) *
15. Demon's Crest (SNES)
16. Cathedral (Switch)
17. Super Mario 3D World (Switch) *
18. Bowser's Fury (Switch)
19. Rogue Heroes: Ruins of Tasos (Switch)
20. moon (Switch)
21. Casltevania 64 (N64)
22. Captain Rainbow (Wii)
23. Doraemon: Nobita To Mittsu No Seireiseki (N64)
24. Blast Corps (N64)
25. Doraemon 2: Nobita To Hikari No Shinden (N64)
26. Custom Robo (N64)

27. Doraemon 3: Nobita No Machi SOS! (N64)

The last of the N64 Doraemon trilogy, and coming to us all the way in the year 2000, so ends my journey through these oddball region-exclusive hidden gems. Coming out in '97, '98, and 2000, the trilogy, despite the varied genres at play, give a pretty neat view of what the N64 could do at a glance as devs figured out how to use it more and more. This one was twice the price of the others when I bought it, so I did go in expecting a bit more than the others, and that's more or less what I got. It took me about six or so hours to do just about everything in the game on hard mode, and I only had to look up one or two things.

The game opens with Nobita being annoyed with doing his summer homework. He complains to Doraemon when suddenly a meteorite explodes in the sky outside. When Nobita goes outside to investigate, he finds his three friends have found the shards of the meteorite, but when put back together, they start a chain reaction that lifts up the block that Nobita lives on, and takes the whole thing into space faaaar away to the planet Duct. With his friends spirited away to who knows where and the town under attack by evil robots, Nobita goes to find Doraemon, only to find him passed out in his room. Everyone in town has been captured in time-space slime, freezing them in place, but Doraemon has partially escaped this fate. While Doraemon himself (and his trusty impact pistol) have escaped being frozen, all the tools in Doraemon's pocket are slimed and unusable! You embark on a mission to save your town and the rest of the citizens of Duct who've also been kidnapped and taken here. The story is a little more involved than the past two games, and it does lend itself to being a little more of an adventure game than the previous ones, but not by a tooooon. It does what it needs to, and also gives you a sense of progression as you go from level to level and area to area.

This is an adventure/action platformer that is in many ways a blend of the first and second games in the trilogy. You go from stage to stage hunting for necessary mcguffins you'll need to access the dungeon at the end of the area, and in that dungeon you'll face a boss to rescue one of your captured friends. You once again have different playable characters (with even Doraemon's little sister eventually joining the fray), and at last their different characteristics (different swimming/running speeds and jumping heights) are explicitly told to you on the character selecting screens. Each one even has their own health bars that need to be healed independently. The gameplay is a mix of some behind-the-shoulder platforming stages (more like Banjo-Kazooie) and fixed camera platforming stages (more like Bomberman Hero), and while it's never particularly difficult, it's a fine test of action and platforming, especially for someone who might not be super experienced in this genre.

However, the refocused story elements and gameplay loop changes somewhat hurt the game mechanically more than anything. As, even though it's nice in a sense to have Doraemon's tools not be lost for once, the way you get them back is by collecting this slime-destroying spray to de-slime them. However, you can grind for the spray if you want, so you can get all of your tools and weapons at the very start of the game if you want. Like in the second game, you do use tools to solve puzzles, but the game just tells you when to use the stuff for the puzzles. While this is a nice feature so you aren't just guessing forever on what tools solve what environmental puzzles, it very much does reek of "the game giving you a solution to a problem it has created itself".

Not even needing to find tools means that exploration isn't so absolutely necessary as in the first two games, but it also means you're just never finding anything interesting by exploring other than more already super abundant healing items (which you can carry tons and tons of, so the game is never super difficult). Healing items being so abundant also means that each character having their own health bar doesn't really encourage switching between them very much, since you always have an over abundant supply of health. These aren't experience breaking problems, but they are an unfortunate drag on the gameplay loop despite how solid the first two games were in that regard.

The presentation is what the trilogy has led us to expect at this point, combined with where N64 development was by 2000. All of the character models have gotten significant upgrades and have a pastel-y, nice Mega Man Legends style to them. There are a lot more animations, and while it isn't exactly Banjo-Tooie in terms of just how flashy it is, it's a very nice looking N64 game. The music is also, once again, pretty darn good, with the boss themes especially being really good.

Verdict: Recommended. I still think the first game in the series is probably my favorite, but this is a much needed mechanical improvement on the second game. It's still got some fundamental design issues that make it feel a bit unrewarding to play in some regards, but it's still a fun time! It's definitely not a great import, as it's got some even more involved adventure/questing aspects than the second game did that require reading, but for those who can get past the language barrier, this is another nice hidden gem on the N64.
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R_Oldgames
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by R_Oldgames Sat Mar 27, 2021 8:53 pm

Until this date (March 27th, 2021), I remember having beaten the following games this year:

1. Horizon Zero Dawn (PS4).

I found the game to be very nice, with a strong story (although it does takes its time to become interesting). The game is not as polished as God of War, for example, but still pretty fun. I will certanly check the sequel out.

2. Super Mario 3D World Deluxe (Switch).

For some reason I tried playing the Wii U version, but gave up in the middle. However , the switch version, though not that different, was easier to get into. It is a pretty fun game, that gets very challenging by the end. You are supposed to beat all the levels with all characters, to unlock everything, but that is just too much, especially considering I play alone. Since I cleard the Champion's Road, I consider the game beaten.

Now playing: The Evil Within (Xbox One version).
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