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prfsnl_gmr
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by prfsnl_gmr Sat Mar 20, 2021 12:04 am

REPO Man wrote:Have you tried the Director's Cut of QUBE?

Also, if you like first-person puzzle games, I STRONGLY recommend Superliminal, ChromaGun and Magrunner.


Thanks, REPO! I played through the Director’s Cut version, and I’ll clarify that in my previous post.

I do really like first-person puzzle games, and I have Magrunner. Superlimininal abd Manifold Garden are also on the short list of games I need for my Switch. Both of them look great.

I’d never heard of ChromaGun, and I’ll have to look into it!
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by PartridgeSenpai Sat Mar 20, 2021 3:54 pm

Partridge Senpai's 2021 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
* indicates a repeat

1. Atelier Rorona: The Alchemist of Arland (PS3)
2. Portal 2 (PC) *
3. Atelier Judie: The Alchemist of Gramnad (PS2)
4. Pipo Saru 2001 (PS2)
5. Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon (N64)
6. Atelier Viorate: The Alchemist of Gramnad 2 (PS2)
7. Kirby's Dream Land 3 (SFC)
8. The Legend of Mystical Ninja (SFC)
9. Atelier Marie: The Alchemist of Salburg (PS1)
10. Ganbare Goemon 2 (SFC)
11. Paper Mario: Origami King (Switch)
12. Star Fox 64 (N64) *
13. Super Paper Mario (Wii) *
14. Paper Mario: The Thousand Year Door (GC) *
15. Demon's Crest (SNES)
16. Cathedral (Switch)
17. Super Mario 3D World (Switch) *
18. Bowser's Fury (Switch)
19. Rogue Heroes: Ruins of Tasos (Switch)
20. moon (Switch)
21. Casltevania 64 (N64)
22. Captain Rainbow (Wii)
23. Doraemon: Nobita To Mittsu No Seireiseki (N64)

24. Blast Corps (N64)

Known as BLASTDOZER over here in Japan, this is a game I'd gotten for three whole dollars CIB back in the States but had never gotten around to playing. I'd actually sold that copy before I moved here, but I found ANOTHER CIB copy over here for the same price XD. I've owned that copy for quite some time, and it's only this TR theme that's gotten me to play it. I was playing the Japanese version of the game, and I didn't bother with most of the mini-game missions, but I did complete all of the main ones and got the credits at the end in around 7 or 8 hours.

Blast Corps doesn't have a ton of story to speak of, and is really more of a conceit for gameplay rather than a fully fledged story. You're a new employee in the titular company, and your job is to use your series of destruction vehicles to destroy buildings in the path of an out of control carrier for nuclear missiles so it doesn't touch them and explode! You've also got hidden beacons to find for extra levels, and hidden scientists to find for the true final mission (and the credits), but that's really it. It's very much a sandbox-style game, and it doesn't really have any pretentions of giving you any more exposition than you absolutely need to accomplish the task at hand.

The gameplay of Blast Corps takes place between the main missions and the unlockable side missions. The main missions are you clearing the way for the previously mentioned nuclear danger truck. If that touches ANYTHING, it's game over and you gotta restart the stage (which is thankfully quick and easy). Your vehicle types range from the easy to use big tumbling robot that tumbles into things to break them, to the somewhat more complicated jet-booster car or bulldozer that just plow into stuff to break them, to the highly technical dump truck that destroys stuff by drift-sliding into them. You start a level in a particular vehicle, but you can get out of your vehicle to swap to a new one nearby if you need to, and you often need to, especially in harder levels.

Aside from the main levels, there are also mini-game levels where you often choose your vehicle at the start instead of getting it given to you like in the normal levels. These levels involve things like destroying a bunch of buildings in a strict time limit or even completing a race, and you get a bronze, silver, or gold (or even platinum, if you're hella hella good at it) for doing it well enough. The game's main levels have this as well, where you get a gold medal for finishing them at all, and then there's another gold medal to be gotten if you destroy every building, free all the survivors (which is just destroying every building but easier), and light up all the lights on the ground by going near them (rewarding you for exploring, I guess). Those side missions in the main levels aren't super interesting, but getting gold on every level does unlock more levels in the post-game, so there is a sort of incentive to do it (although I did not).

Blast Corps is fundamentally a puzzle game at its core, as you need to not just find out how to destroy the buildings in time, but also actually DO it. This makes it very much like another British-created puzzle game: Lemmings. Blast Corps, as a result, also shares a lot of the problems Lemmings has. It even has what I call the Lemmings Problem: You know what to do for how to solve it, but now you gotta DO it. Blast Corps suffers more from this than anything else, and how much that impacts your enjoyment of it will really determine how much of a winner this game is for you (AJ loves this game a lot, and I'm a lot more mixed on it). The large degree of technicality that something like the dump truck uses compared to the bulldozer or robots make for a really uneven difficulty curve as well, and combined with somewhat awkward camera controls (you've gotta take your hand off the accelerator to turn the camera, and in the later levels which have SUPER strict time limits, that can be a death sentence) that can sometimes make walls look invisible, you've got a game that is pretty easy fun on the lower end of its difficulty, but a game I find very hard to recommend anyone stick with to see the credits in.

The presentation is fine, but nothing about it stands out a ton. It was a game made by a very new, quite small team in just about a year, and so it's a game that largely just "works" as well as it does and that's all it really needed to do. It's not an ugly game, and stuff like the big one-armed tumble robot are very iconic (one-armed because the designer ran out of memory to make the other arm, and then just liked how it looked so he kept it X3). It's also nearly identical to its English counterparts, with the only changes being some slightly more lenient platinum medal times and the graphics updated to reflect the different title.

Verdict: Hesitantly Recommended. It's kinda a shame they never expanded upon this concept, as with a bit more spit and polish, a Blast Corps 2 could've been something really special. As it is, this is a game that is really hard to recommend unless you can get it for cheap. It could be something you really love, but it could be something you're pushing through to beat out of spite like I did. It's generally pretty cheap, so if you like N64 games and the concept of a time/score attack building destroying game sounds cool, then this is probably worth picking up, but if any of this has sounded not up your alley, I don't think you're missing out on a ton by passing this one by.
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by LOGICHACK Mon Mar 22, 2021 6:08 am

REPO Man wrote:I wouldn't say I beat it, since apparently it's still early in development, but Dead by Daylight for Game Boy, a fan made "demake" of the asymmetrical multiplayer horror game. I believe it's made with GB Studio, which has led to a boom of homebrew Game Boy titles, particularly horror games.

Here, you play a survivor avoiding 4 killers, in lieu of 4 survivors avoiding a single killer, as you find oil cans to repair generators. Three cans spawn in at a time, with three new cans spawning in after repairing a generator. After fixing all four (currently there's no randomization where the cans and generators spawn), you head to one of the two exits.


Hope You Liked It :D ! Have you Found The Secret Ending Yet? :wink:
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PartridgeSenpai
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by PartridgeSenpai Mon Mar 22, 2021 7:06 am

Partridge Senpai's 2021 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
* indicates a repeat

1. Atelier Rorona: The Alchemist of Arland (PS3)
2. Portal 2 (PC) *
3. Atelier Judie: The Alchemist of Gramnad (PS2)
4. Pipo Saru 2001 (PS2)
5. Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon (N64)
6. Atelier Viorate: The Alchemist of Gramnad 2 (PS2)
7. Kirby's Dream Land 3 (SFC)
8. The Legend of Mystical Ninja (SFC)
9. Atelier Marie: The Alchemist of Salburg (PS1)
10. Ganbare Goemon 2 (SFC)
11. Paper Mario: Origami King (Switch)
12. Star Fox 64 (N64) *
13. Super Paper Mario (Wii) *
14. Paper Mario: The Thousand Year Door (GC) *
15. Demon's Crest (SNES)
16. Cathedral (Switch)
17. Super Mario 3D World (Switch) *
18. Bowser's Fury (Switch)
19. Rogue Heroes: Ruins of Tasos (Switch)
20. moon (Switch)
21. Casltevania 64 (N64)
22. Captain Rainbow (Wii)
23. Doraemon: Nobita To Mittsu No Seireiseki (N64)
24. Blast Corps (N64)

25. Doraemon 2: Nobita To Hikari No Shinden (N64)

With the title translating to "Nobita and the Temple of Light", this is the second in the Doraemon N64 trilogy, and after enjoying the first game so much, I rushed out to procure the other two games to see how they stacked up. Much to my surprise, this is actually quite the genre change compared to the first game, and also doesn't connect to the first in any way narratively despite the "2" present in the title XD. I guess this one just happens to be based off of somewhere different in the manga. It took me around 7 or so hours to beat the game getting all but a handful of the collectibles.

The story here is similarly overly verbose like the first game's is, but it's an entirely new story about Doraemon, Nobita, and their friends. While traveling home on their time machine from an adventure, Nobita pulls out the shiny crystal he nabbed during their trip. However, the crystal suddenly goes off in an explosion of light that swallows the whole gang, dropping them in an unfamiliar location. Nobita finds himself alone in a strange fantasy land, and after finding his friends (which doesn't take toooo long), he learns that the whole reason this land is in peril is because of the gem he stole. He and his friends need to recover the other power crystals and restore the titular Temple of Light to an equilibrium to save the world~. The story is predictably nothing stellar (this is just a kids game, after all), and it's packed with fairly uninteresting dialogue among the many NPCs you meet. And there are a lot of NPCs in this game, because this is an adventure game!

Where the first Doraemon 64 game plays more like a simplified Banjo-Kazooie, this game takes a big genre leap in that it plays far more like a simplified 3D Zelda with some platforming thrown in. However, it's far from a typical action/adventure game. You can change characters during specific plot points, but I don't think you can change them at will? At least I never found out how, although they all seemed to play more similarly than they did in the first game. You have an overworld composed of many areas with three dungeons to find those special gems in, but there's only combat in those dungeons. The overworld is entirely for solving puzzles (both environmental and NPC-related) and some simple platforming, and you can't even use weapons in it. The camera angle in the overworld is a pretty zoomed out isometric view, compared to the behind-the-shoulder closer angle in the dungeons, so combat would be pretty weird there, but it's still an odd way to put the game together.

The adventure aspect of the game is overall pretty weak, sadly. A lot of the running around is mostly back tracking and just hunting for one of Doraemon's (once again lost) tools to use in the place you happen to need to use it, or going to do something for an NPC yet again (the lead-up to the 2nd dungeon is really bad about this). There not even being combat makes it feel like even more of a chore to get around to do these. However, the dungeons, while short, are quite well designed between their combat and their platforming. It's still the limited, no targeting method used in the first game, but it still ends up being a lot easier to hit enemies and the bosses are by and large pretty darn good too. It's far from a terribly hard game

The presentation is pretty standard for a third-party '98 N64 game, but it's still quite solid regardless. While the graphics may not be super pretty, the character models have definitely gotten an upgrade since the previous game. The music is also once again pretty darn good, and I'm genuinely pretty bummed that I can't find a dump of the OST anywhere online. The only really weirdly bad part is the UI, which has the worst, most slow and unresponsive menu scrolling I've ever seen.

Verdict: Hesitantly Recommended. This game goes for a much bolder experience than its predecessor, but it ends up falling flat. The clumsy usage of the adventure aspects mean the solid dungeon action/platforming sections get sidelined to a secondary part of the experience in a way that's a real shame. The adventure aspects also sadly mean that this is a far more difficult game to get through if you don't know Japanese. While it would be possible with a guide, I don't think it's particularly worth importing this game compared to the first game. While it's still pretty fun and a bit of a hidden gem among N64 import games, it's a disappointing step back compared to how solid the first game was.
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BoneSnapDeez
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by BoneSnapDeez Mon Mar 22, 2021 11:08 am

1. Richard Scarry's Huckle and Lowly's Busiest Day Ever (Pico)
2. Countermeasure (Atari 5200)
3. Alex Kidd: High-Tech World (Sega Master System)
4. Kirby's Dream Land 2 (Game Boy)
5. Night Stalker (Intellivision)
6. Space Battle (Intellivision)
7. Utopia (Intellivision)
8. Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (Intellivision)
9. Kirby Super Star (SNES)
10. Kirby's Dream Land 3 (SNES)
11. Kirby Slide (e-Reader)
12. Super Mario Maker 2 (Switch)
13. Love Hina Advance: Shukufuku no Kane wa Harukana (Game Boy Advance)
14. Seirei Gari (Famicom)
15. Chaos;Head (PC)
16. Sanma no Meitantei (Famicom)

17. Giana Sisters DS (DS)
Image
In 1987, a German-developed game called The Great Giana Sisters was released for the Commodore 64, and soon ported to additional microcomputers. A robust, scrolling platformer boasting over thirty stages, it was one of the first of its kind to be seen outside of consoles and arcades. There was just one tiny little issue (besides the atrocious cover art): the game was extraordinarily similar to Super Mario Bros. in a great many respects, including but not limited to: stage designs, the power-up system, enemy roster, and background graphics. As such, the game was soon withdrawn from store shelves, allegedly due to the possibility of a lawsuit being filed by Nintendo. The game in its original state has since become ultra-rare, fetching some seriously high prices on the secondary market. For twenty years The Great Giana Sisters was all but forgotten, spoken of only occasionally by those who remembered it (or discovered it via emulation) as that goofy little Mario rip-off. That is, until 2009 (or 2011 for North Americans) when a pseudo-sequel Giana Sisters DS humorously arrived on Nintendo's handheld to occupy a slot in the DS platformer library right alongside Mario himself. Giana Sisters DS contains elements of the original game, albeit significantly "enhanced" and revamped, plus a host of new content.

In my review of Neutopia, a derivative title in its own right, I stated it was impossible to review the game without also inadvertently reviewing The Legend of Zelda. The same principle applies here: even in its new and improved form, Giana Sisters DS still contains a host of Mario DNA. So, the game itself is a side-scrolling 2D platformer, with its content divvied up into eight worlds which are then further broken down into individual stages. Giana can move left and right, duck (though her sprite barely shrinks), and jump. Oddly enough, she doesn't seem to actually have a sister. Instead, a "ball" power-up transforms the cutesy girly-girl Giana into Punk Giana (how very '87...). In Punk form Giana can withstand an extra hit (damage transforms her back to her regular state), smash bricks, and shoot energy balls. The energy balls have a weird downward arc, so they often need to be blasted while jumping to be effective. A brief textless cutscene opens the game to relay Giana's mission: the recovery of her precious blue diamonds. Diamonds are the "coins" of the game: they're often scattered about in the open, are sometimes housed inside of special blocks, and gathering one hundred grants an extra life.
Image
The stage designs are amusing, as it's easy to spot which environments are "throwbacks" and which are altogether original. The old school stages tend to be simple flat plains, littered with obstacles like pitfalls, dissolving bridges, block piles, and pipes (they couldn't help themselves!). 2009-era stages are beefier with both vertical and horizontal scrolling. They're rarely true "mazes" but often feature multiple avenues to the exit. The enemy selection is rather small, with the whole line-up essentially displayed on the box art. Most enemies are defeated with either a stomp or an energy ball blast, though some foes are impervious to both. A recurring boss, found in the "castle" stages, is a clear nod to Bowser. A big chunky goofy dragon, he's taken out with a few clean stomps to the head (interestingly, the C64 original instead showcased some creepy-looking pterodactyl bosses).

In later stages, two additional power-ups are offered. These can "stack" on top of the Punk power-up, can be stored and activated later, and don't offer any extra defensive protection. The chewing gum power-up allows Giana to float around environments, until she hits something that literally bursts her bubble. Meanwhile, the soda bottle power-up is used to destroy large piles of vertically-stacked bricks with its lethal carbonation. Such power-ups are dispensed from vending machines, and sometimes Giana must visit a machine multiple times per stage if said item needs to be utilized more than once. The basic controls (walking and jumping) feel comfortable enough and are mechanically competent, but gameplay is still a bit quirky. Unlike Super Mario Bros., there's no distinction between walking and running. Giana never gains momentum and trots at a constant pace. Jumps can be tweaked midair, which is nice, but many stages (mostly later ones) feel designed to screw up Giana's jumping for no good reason at all. There are numerous stretches with annoyingly low ceilings, and the developers were apparently fond of tiny platforms and giant chasms that can just barely be cleared. There's also some weirdness involving the chewing gum and soda power-ups; here the developers got cute by requiring the player use the DS touch screen to activate these upgrades. Meanwhile, the Y and X buttons are redundant while L and R are completely unused. Moreover, to control Giana in the bubble the player is actually supposed to blow into the microphone (get it... blowing bubbles). Thankfully, this "blow mode" can be turned off and the A button used instead. The instruction manual recommends deactivating the mic in a noisy environment, like a car or an airplane. This prevents the microphone from picking up unwanted noise and also prevents the player from looking like an idiot.
Image
There's a small amount of hidden bonus content to found. Alongside the standard blue diamonds, there are some scarce red ones. By collecting all of these in a given world, a bonus stage will open. Said bonus stages contain massive caches of blue diamonds -- since levels can be repeated ad nauseam these are fine places to farm for 1-ups. The game's inconsistent about the red diamonds, however. For the first six worlds they aren't especially difficult to nab: there's maybe three per stage and they're tucked away but aren't too concealed. Come World 7, however, and there's now ten or twelve red diamonds per stage, scattered in all sorts of obscure spots. "Collectathons" are never fun. The game also contains a set of "trophies" which are analogous to PlayStation trophies and Steam achievements; these are granted upon completing specific tasks like slaying a set number of foes, or finishing Giana's journey without seeing the Game Over screen. A couple of "challenge stages" also present themselves after the credits roll, but they're oddly tedious and altogether skippable. With eighty plus total stages, Giana's journey ends up feeling rather bloated. Certain environments, like the standard "1-1" outdoor setting, are recycled constantly. And, sadly enough, this "updated" DS adventure still feels patently inferior to 8-bit Mario, as it's wholly lacking in all the little idiosyncrasies that made Mario so intriguing. Poor Giana is unable to enter pipes, has no vines to climb, no skies or seas to explore, no treetops to scamper over, and she faces no real clever adversaries.

The visuals are quite pleasing. Giana's really cute, drawn in a Western almost-anime fashion. The cutscenes are rather pretty; it's too bad they simply bookend the whole shebang, as opposed to appearing after every conquered world. Stage backgrounds have a watercolor look, with a calm, soothing color palette. Chris Huelsbeck's original soundtrack is here, heavily remixed, with a bunch of new tunes tacked on top. These are some truly upbeat and energetic tracks, but they sounded much better coming out of the C64's glorious SID chip. It's unfortunate there's no "original soundtrack" option, as seen in Ys Eternal and other "retro remakes."

All told, Giana Sisters DS is a fair experience, fun enough for what it is. The developers were certainly right about one thing: this is the type of game one would play in a car or aboard an airplane, or perhaps in a living room while an "equally interesting" television show blares in the background. It's that type of "mindless" fun that almost overstays its welcome; thankfully the journey can be wrapped up within a single day, if not a single lengthy sitting. For a select few retro C64 gamers, Giana Sisters DS is a much unexpected trip down memory lane. For most, it's a throwback to a bizarre retro gaming anecdote that would otherwise be forgotten.
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by REPO Man Mon Mar 22, 2021 3:42 pm

LOGICHACK wrote:
REPO Man wrote:I wouldn't say I beat it, since apparently it's still early in development, but Dead by Daylight for Game Boy, a fan made "demake" of the asymmetrical multiplayer horror game. I believe it's made with GB Studio, which has led to a boom of homebrew Game Boy titles, particularly horror games.

Here, you play a survivor avoiding 4 killers, in lieu of 4 survivors avoiding a single killer, as you find oil cans to repair generators. Three cans spawn in at a time, with three new cans spawning in after repairing a generator. After fixing all four (currently there's no randomization where the cans and generators spawn), you head to one of the two exits.


Hope You Liked It :D ! Have you Found The Secret Ending Yet? :wink:


No, since I've only played it once. I might play it again. Does it matter which exit I use?
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prfsnl_gmr
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by prfsnl_gmr Mon Mar 22, 2021 4:05 pm

BoneSnapDeez wrote:17. Giana Sisters DS (DS)


Awesome review, as usual. Did you find the original levels during your playthrough?
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by BoneSnapDeez Mon Mar 22, 2021 5:15 pm

Yup. 8)

I also played the original C64 game via emulation some years back. Good but kinda janky controls.
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by LOGICHACK Mon Mar 22, 2021 5:18 pm

REPO Man wrote:
LOGICHACK wrote:
REPO Man wrote:I wouldn't say I beat it, since apparently it's still early in development, but Dead by Daylight for Game Boy, a fan made "demake" of the asymmetrical multiplayer horror game. I believe it's made with GB Studio, which has led to a boom of homebrew Game Boy titles, particularly horror games.

Here, you play a survivor avoiding 4 killers, in lieu of 4 survivors avoiding a single killer, as you find oil cans to repair generators. Three cans spawn in at a time, with three new cans spawning in after repairing a generator. After fixing all four (currently there's no randomization where the cans and generators spawn), you head to one of the two exits.


Hope You Liked It :D ! Have you Found The Secret Ending Yet? :wink:


No, since I've only played it once. I might play it again. Does it matter which exit I use?

You can get into the basement when a certain number of generators are completed and press select
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by REPO Man Mon Mar 22, 2021 11:44 pm

LOGICHACK wrote:
REPO Man wrote:
LOGICHACK wrote:Hope You Liked It :D ! Have you Found The Secret Ending Yet? :wink:


No, since I've only played it once. I might play it again. Does it matter which exit I use?

You can get into the basement when a certain number of generators are completed and press select


Found it.

Also, I notice that when I pause the game the tanks reappear and if I collect them, regardless of the number of tanks I've already collected, it's possible to not being able to fix any of the generators.

Anyone else here try it?
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