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Markies
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Re: Games Beaten 2020

by Markies Tue Jul 07, 2020 10:05 pm

Markies' Games Beat List Of 2020!
*Denotes Replay For Completion*

1. Pikmin 2 (GCN)
2. Banjo-Tooie (N64)
3. Contra: Hard Corps (GEN)
4. Super Baseball Simulator 1,000 (SNES)
5. Chip 'N Dale Rescue Rangers 2 (NES)
6. Pinball Hall of Fame: The Gottlieb Collection (PS2)
***7. Grand Theft Auto: Liberty City Stories (PS2)***
***8. Cruis'N USA (N64)***
9. Arc The Lad Collection (PS1)
10. Halo 2 (XBX)
11. Baten Kaitos: Eternal Wings And The Lost Ocean (GCN)
12. DuckTales 2 (NES)
13. Atelier Iris 3: Grand Phantasm (PS2)

14. Rocket Knight Adventures (GEN)

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I beat Rocket Knight Adventures on the Sega Genesis this evening.

Rocket Knight Adventures is a game I've had on my shelf for over a decade. I was out shopping with a friend of mine and he remembered the game from back in the day. He is a Nintendo fan and this was one of the few Sega games he actually remembered. I rented it once or twice and enjoyed playing it despite how hard it was, so I decided to purchase. Throughout my backlogging years, I would put in the game once a year and make slow progress. I would beat one new level and then die almost instantly at the next level. After many years, I decided this year, I would finally sit down and beat the damn game. Well, after one session, I can finally say that I beat the game.

Rocket Knight Adventures is developed by Konami, more importantly, it is made by the guy who did many Contra games. You can obviously tell as I felt the game was made by the team at Konami who eventually left and formed Treasure. The game is full of boss fights. In fact, you are fighting three to five of them per stage, some with multiple forms. I will say that each boss fight is unique and challenging, so it doesn't get too repetitive or straining on you. They last exactly how long you want them to last as they aren't too over-bearing. The gimmick in the game is the rocket pack attached to your character that allows you to shoot across the screen. The rocket moves the action along much faster than a normal action game with a sword and makes for some interesting combinations in the game. I liked the Shoot'em Up levels, though they did feel a little too long. All things considering, the game doesn't have much of a story, but I did like it. I found it appropriate that a knight should rescue a Princess.

I'd say my biggest complaint would be the difficulty. Some attacks deal several hearts worth of damage and sometimes you do feel rather weak. You won't beat it on your first try, but the game is good enough to want to play it more.

Overall, I enjoyed my short and long time with Rocket Knight Adventures. The game has wonderful graphics with some cool effects on different levels. Also, the music is quite good, though the boss theme played a bit too much, obviously. It is an interesting action game and one of the better ones for the 16-Bit Era. If you like Konami, Contra and 16 Bit Action games, Rocket Knight Adventures is a must play for any fan.
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marurun
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Re: Games Beaten 2020

by marurun Tue Jul 07, 2020 10:35 pm

Konami’s Genesis team did appear to be very interested in chasing Treasure. But nobody on Konami’s Genesis titles was a Treasure defector. Those folks had already left KONAMI. Most of the Treasure staff had their last game at KONAMI as either Contra III, Axelay, or Bucky O’Hare.
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Re: Games Beaten 2020

by dust_hound Wed Jul 08, 2020 8:47 am

8th July 2020 - Assassin's Creed Chronicles (PS Vita)
This is a collection of three games, featuring the stories of different assassins during some less frequently utilised settings in gaming: feudal China in 1526, colonial India in 1841, and the Russian October Revolution in 1918.

Diverging from the usual AC play style, the games are side-scrolling 2.5D action platformers with a focus on stealth and with other elements sprinkled into the mix. After each level, performance bonuses are awarded based on how well you did, like avoiding being spotted, assassinating everyone without leaving a trace etc. Some sections can rely on very strict timing to get through, others assign at-first seemingly impossible targets to assassinate, and there are also environmental puzzles. I really enjoyed this diversity of tasks which surprised me since the actual format of the games might at first seem rather limiting. Each of the assassins has different tools to help them through the stages, but also a similar core moveset like stealth killing, takedowns, hiding etc. This makes each of the three games feel slightly different to the others but retaining that familiarity of controls.

The story in each is told via fantastically stylised comic book style cutscenes. China's are done with a billowing ink style, whilst India features cutscenes with Asian decorative motifs, and Russia has a style mimicking the old Soviet propaganda posters. I don't know anything about how actually culturally-accurate these are, but they make an impact nonetheless. Visuals aside, the stories are fairly well constructed for what they are, taking in numerous real-life historical persons and weaving them into the story of the ages-long ongoing struggle between the Assassins and the Templars. I definitely felt motivation to keep playing through to find out what happened next in each scenario.

Overall I think these were pretty well-made but maybe players may have felt let-down that they were 'only' 2.5D games with fairly linear stages, since AC is known for its open-world structure and freedom. To me, however, there's a lot to be said for a short and focused game, and it was great to have this in the Assassin's Creed universe. There's new game plus and additional difficulties, but I'm satisfied after my ~18hr run through, and probably won't revisit the games in the near future. That said, they were a great glimpse at how a classic game structure could be enhanced by modern controls and gameplay elements.
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Re: Games Beaten 2020

by BoneSnapDeez Thu Jul 09, 2020 12:03 pm

1. ACA NeoGeo: Cyber-Lip (Switch eShop)
2. Pengo (Atari 2600)
3. Kirby's Epic Yarn (Wii)
4. Knights of Xentar (PC)
5. Hoshi o Sagashite... (Mark III)
6. Dead Zone (Famicom Disk System)
7. Samurai Sword (Famicom Disk System)
8. High School! Kimengumi (Mark III)
9. Princess Tomato in the Salad Kingdom (NES)
10. Sindbad Mystery (SG-1000)
11. Steins;Gate (Vita)
12. Champion Boxing (SG-1000)
13. Squidlit (Switch eShop)
14. Skyblazer (SNES)
15. Tokyo Dark: Remembrance (Switch eShop)
16. Bubble Bobble (Famicom Disk System)
17. Steins;Gate Elite (Switch)
18. Johnny Turbo's Arcade: Joe and Mac Returns (Switch eShop)
19. Johnny Turbo's Arcade: Express Raider (Switch eShop)
20. Alex Kidd in the Enchanted Castle (Genesis)
21. Sword of Vermilion (Genesis)
22. Steins;Gate: My Darling's Embrace (Switch eShop)
23. Oink! (Atari 2600)
24. Bio Miracle Bokutte Upa (Famicom Disk System)
25. Super Castlevania IV (SNES)
26. Phantasy Star Online (Dreamcast)
27. Chaos;Child (Vita)
28. Scar of the Doll (Steam)
29. Kirby's Adventure (NES)
30. Rhapsody: A Musical Adventure (PlayStation)
31. Hangman (Atari 2600)

32. Metal Slug (Neo Geo MVS)
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I've always maintained that Konami's Contra is the best run and gun video game of all time. With its slick eight-directional shooting, flawless controls, extraterrestrial adversaries, and stylish graphical presentation, Contra and its various ports and sequels ruled the shooting scene throughout the late 80s and early 90s, with installments spread across arcades, consoles, handhelds, and (somewhat regrettably) home computers. However, when the mid 90s arrived and gaming transitioned to 32 and 64-bit machines, the allure of 3D was too strong and Contra became yet another victim, with Legacy of War marking the descent of a once-great series. While 1996 may have marked the downfall of Contra, it's also the year that welcomed a new run and gun titan by the name of Metal Slug. Developed by Nazca, the game was released by SNK across their "trinity" of systems: as an MVS arcade cartridge (the subject of this review), as an AES home cartridge (comically rare), and as a disc for the Neo Geo CD. The game was soon after ported to the Saturn and PlayStation (in Japan), and has since shown up on multiple compilations. Not to mention the digital reissues on Steam, the Nintendo eShop, and elsewhere. The game is everywhere. Begging to be played, to be experienced.

There's a backstory here, though it's not relayed within the context of the game itself. The year is 2028 (uh-oh...) and General Morden has waged a coup d'état, apparently overthrowing all the world's governments (nice...). Only a one-man (or two-man) army can save the day. Some players may be disappointed in the limited character roster here, as there are only two dudes, Marco and Tarma, who are assigned to players one and two, respectively. Additionally, the original Metal Slug features a "realistic" setting. There are no aliens, no zombies, no lurching Egyptian mummies. Just endless hordes of Morden's decidedly human underlings.
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What's immediately apparent is the game's slapstick nature. The heroes are perpetually smirking doofuses, eager to unload lead upon the opposition. The enemies themselves are portrayed as hapless and stupid. They remain idle -- sunbathing, roasting sausages, conversing -- until snuck up on, whereupon their eyes bulge out in confusion and fear. Metal Slug is comically violent, where perpetual blood splatter and explosions consume a noticeable share of screen real estate. The holistic experience is "sloppier" when compared to the likes of Contra, given the massive glut of foes. There's less emphasis on stealth and stage memorization; it's more about frantic button mashing, joystick twirling, and mowing down anything that moves.

The control scheme is initially relayed via a tutorial, in typical Neo Geo fashion. There's a button for jumping, one for shooting, and one for tossing bombs. Button D is akin to the Neo Geo X: completely useless. Controls are fluid and pleasing. The initial pea shooter is four-directional and a little stiff, but weapon upgrades are common. These are granted by liberated hostages, scruffy blonde gentlemen who pace around frantically, or are tied up in need of a rescue. There's the rapid-fire heavy machine gun, heavy-duty rocket launcher, wide-projecting flamethrower. Special weapons have limited ammunition, but there's no use trying to conserve ammo given the constant stream of enemies. It's best to just blast away and seek out every hostage. The player starts with a cache of ten powerful bombs, though more can be collected along the way. These are tossed at an arc and best saved for bosses, larger enemy arrangements, and "panic" situations.

An interesting twist to combat: Marco and Tarma don't receive damage when simply "touching" an enemy; instead they must be struck by an actual enemy attack. Additionally, when pressed against an enemy, the player's default "gun" attack instead becomes a quick knife swipe. There's an element of strategy here: as some foes carry shields in addition to firearms, they must be defeated with precisely-timed melee sneak attacks. Overall, combat itself, the meat of the game, is incredibly satisfying. There's a pleasing "weight" to all hits and kills, and the carnage never ceases.
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But there's more. Occasionally players will get to hop on board an eponymous "Metal Slug" -- a massive "super vehicle" tank. These tanks come with their own lifebar, a reprieve from the standard one-hit death system. The tanks are equipped with a rotating turret, primed and ready to take out scores of onscreen belligerents and put quite the dent in bosses. The "Metal Slug" controls are a bit finicky, in a way that's difficult to explain. It's like they were designed to be twin-stick, but the Neo Geo obviously only provides one joystick per player. The firing turret can be rotated in a 360 degree manner, but doing so also tends to move the entire tank simultaneously. In any event, destruction of the tank doesn't actually annihilate the player, provided they can escape in time.

Graphics are excellent, boasting some gorgeous pixel art. That said, the "realistic" setting does make things feel a bit samey, as most stages present some variation of the "burned-down war-torn city" trope. On a similar note, bosses are all of the "giant tank or plane" variety. There's an element of "interactive scenery" to be found within each stage: bridges crumble, boats sink, forts disintegrate. Animation is hand-drawn and exquisite. The soundtrack is upbeat and militaristic, with an emphasis on thumping synths and rhythmic percussion. Of course, much of the music is drowned out by the constant barrage of sound effects. These are amusing in their own right: enemies emit varying death yells based on the manner of their executions, and an overly enthusiastic announcer shouts the name of each acquired piece of weaponry.

As an arcade game, there is a point tally in Metal Slug. The score can be maximized by rescuing hostages, and then subsequently finishing a stage without losing a life. An additional chunk of points is granted to players who manage to compete a stage with the "Metal Slug" tank fully operational. As far as Neo Geo games go, this is on the lower end of the challenge spectrum, especially compared to the likes of, say, Magician Lord and all subsequent Metal Slug sequels. A 1CC is doable for those willing to put in the time and effort. All told, being the first Metal Slug entry this one is the most simplistic of the bunch. But there's something to be said for that. It's a straightforward thirty minute sweaty palms romp through hell and back, and sometimes that's all we really need.
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Re: Games Beaten 2020

by REPO Man Thu Jul 09, 2020 12:37 pm

Superliminal for PS4, a surreal first-person puzzle game where the motif is optical illusions and forced perspective, which is used to allow one to shrink and grow items, among other things.
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PartridgeSenpai
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Re: Games Beaten 2020

by PartridgeSenpai Thu Jul 09, 2020 5:40 pm

Partridge Senpai's 2020 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018 2019
* indicates a repeat

1. Invisigun Reloaded (Switch)
2. Human: Fall Flat (Switch)
3. Shantae: The Pirate's Curse (3DS)
4. Darksiders: Warmastered Edition (PC)
5. Splatterhouse (PS3) *
6. 3D Dot Game Heroes (PS3)
7. Tokyo Jungle (PS3)
8. Pictobits (DSiWare)
9. Puzzle Quest: The Legend Reborn (Switch)
10. WarioWare Gold (3DS)
11. Disaster: Day of Crisis (Wii)
12. Sleeping Dogs: Definitive Edition (Xbone)
13. Sleeping Dogs: Nightmare in North Point (Xbone)
14. Sleeping Dogs: Year of the Snake (Xbone)
15. Dynamite Headdy (Genesis) *
16. Shovel Knight: King of Cards (3DS)
17. Shovel Knight: Shovel of Hope (3DS) *
18. Shovel Knight: Plague of Shadows (Switch) *
19. Shovel Knight: Specter of Torment (Switch) *
20. Shovel Knight: Showdown (Switch)
21. Dragon Quest Builders 2 (PS4)
22. ActRaiser (SNES)
23. Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth (WiiWare)
24. Mega Man X (SNES)
25. Breath of Fire II (SNES)
26. Ape Escape 2 (PS2) *
27. Doubutsu No Mori+ (GC)
28. Ape Escape (PS1)
29. Ape Escape 3 (PS2) *
30. Maken X (DC)
31. Cubivore (GC)
32. Wario World (GC) *
33. Hatoful Boyfriend (PC)
34. Fire Emblem: Mystery of the Emblem (SFC)

35. Baku Bomberman 2 (N64)

Known in the West as Bomberman 64: The Second Attack, it's always been weird to me how this is often a 500 yen game in Japan but in the West it's easily in the $200-range. So last weekend I finally took the plunge on giving this game a go, as I'm really in the mood for some N64 stuff, I suppose. Now, I eventually realized with the help of TCRF that the Japanese and American versions are significantly different, and that was further driven home by looking at the HLTB time. The HLTB time for just beating the game was 6.5 hours, and this game easily took me over 20 hours to finish with the good ending in Japanese XD. This was definitely a game I didn't wanna let beat me, but it certainly was never something quite as bad as Maken X.

Baku Bomberman 2 is another in the series of more action-adventure spins on the Bomberman formula that Hudson became so obsessed with in the 5th console generation, and the 3rd of such games on the N64. Bomberman found an egg at some point and he brought it with him because he thought it was cool. Then, flying along in his spaceship, he gets sucked into a black hole and captured by a mysterious group known as the B.H.B. Gang. The egg hatches to reveal Pomyu, a little Kirby-like (extremely Kirby-like) alien who was just napping inside the egg and whom Bomberman has effectively unintentionally kidnapped XD. They fight a sentai-esque bad guy to escape this prison planet and begin their mission to fight the Seven Elemental Knights (the heads of the B.H.B.), destroy the black hole generators, and escape from this black hole dimension.

There's a really weird amount of text in this game for a Bomberman game, but I wouldn't say it's all bad. Some of it is quite weird, like there being a good and bad ending for the game each with its own final boss (and the conditions for activating each ending are just how you defeat the sub-boss in the final mission), and the credits being like 15-20 minutes long with the cutscene that happens after the final battle. Some of it is also quite funny, like how the Seven Elemental Knights all seem to hate each other and never get along despite being part of the same organization XD. But for the most part, it's silly, sentai fun with Bomberman fighting different campy elemental-themed bad guys. It's nothing to write home about, sure, but it's not a drag on the game either.

The game itself is made up of 8 stages which have a first and second part, with each part split by a boss fight against one of the Seven Elemental Knights. You beat a Knight, then use the new element you get from it to solve more puzzles between that and the puzzle room at the end where you need to destroy the black hole generator. The platforming (although given that Bomberman can't really jump, it's kinda odd to call them that) sections are generally pretty fun. Some of the puzzles are signposted terribly (particularly one in the final level regarding a lava pit), and I had to look up what to do/where to go more than once, but it has the same basic powerups of bombs, power, speed, remote detonation, throw, and kick that Bomberman usually has. If you keep an eye out and return to some past stages, you can even get armor that permanently gives you the throw, kick, and remote detonation powers! Although the remote detonation does deactivate during boss battles, unfortunately.

And the boss battles are the best but worst parts of the game, largely for reasons that were thankfully fixed in the English version. The bosses tend to have at least two forms, and all of them have a sort of super saiyan-looking charge up move they do when they get to low health that will instantly kill you if they hit you (ouch). The biggest problem the bosses have, in either version (so far as I can tell) is that their invincibility frames are utterly unfair garbage (particularly the wind boss). It makes hitting them really awkward and difficult to do, and that's already a difficult task when you have to hit them with only bombs that you can't remotely detonate. They're thankfully learnable and for the most part do have readable patterns.

I would say the final boss of the good ending is one of the best fights in the game in that regard. I was on voice chat with a friend at the time, and upon beating it I told her "this must be what people who like Dark Souls feel like with those games" with just how proud I was of myself that I stuck through it, learned the patterns, and conquered that final challenge. But there are also some bosses, most notably the final boss of the bad ending, who have nearly (or outright) undodgeable attacks and are horrible, unfun fights (the reason I went for the good ending in the first place is because I didn't see myself ever beating that bastard). On the whole, I would say the boss fights are the highlights of the game, but a combination of weird I-frames and sometimes painful backtracking to their locations sours that a fair bit.

Now would be as good a time as ever to clarify the significant changes made to the Western port of this game and explain the large differences between the HLTB times. One of the first big changes is that the Western game has a life system. While this may sound bad at first, the weird way it's implemented means it makes the game a lot easier and at the very least saves you a lot of time. In the Japanese version, whenever you die, you get a continue screen where you can back out to the world map (and lose all progress in the level) or continue from your last checkpoint (usually either the start of the level, or just after beating the mid-boss). There's also a really mean and unnecessary countdown timer on that screen that more than once sent me totally out of a level because I forgot it was there and looked away for a little bit too long XP. But in the Japanese version, you always lose your powerups when you activate one of these infinite continues. In the Western version, as long as you have an extra life to expend, you keep your powerups. This means you spend a lot less time going around re-collecting them before boss fights and hard enemy rooms.

The most significant change, however, is definitely the fact that Bomberman simply moves far faster in the Western release of the game. In the Japanese version, with a speed powerup (as only the first one you collect seems to do anything), you're just about barely fast enough to dodge what's coming at you, particularly in boss fights. The reason the bad ending final boss is so hard is that he has a rapid laser fire move that you just aren't fast enough to dodge, and lots of bosses have attacks that you need to barely juke them out of by doing hard-corners since they're so much faster than you when they do faster attacks. Moving faster means you not only die to bosses less (since you can dodge easier), but you also just move through the levels a lot faster too (it's genuinely like 75% to 100% faster than the Japanese version). For example, you can actually run fast enough to dodge the bad ending final boss' laser attacks in the Western version, where that just isn't ever possible in Japanese.

Verdict: Hesitantly Recommended. While I did complain a fair bit about this game to friends over Discord and Slack in the course of playing it, I stuck with it because I was genuinely enjoying my time with it and really wanted to see it through to the end (even if that was at least partially because I just didn't want the game to beat me XD). The game isn't impossible in Japanese, but from everything I researched, the Western release definitely seems to be the version to go with if you're gonna play it. It's a 3D game typically rough for this time period, but it's closer to the "still enjoyable" end of the 3D-jank spectrum of 5th generation games. Certainly not for everyone, but worth a try via emulation if you want something a little different, and especially if you enjoyed the other N64 Bomberman games at all.
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BoneSnapDeez
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Re: Games Beaten 2020

by BoneSnapDeez Fri Jul 10, 2020 1:17 pm

1. ACA NeoGeo: Cyber-Lip (Switch eShop)
2. Pengo (Atari 2600)
3. Kirby's Epic Yarn (Wii)
4. Knights of Xentar (PC)
5. Hoshi o Sagashite... (Mark III)
6. Dead Zone (Famicom Disk System)
7. Samurai Sword (Famicom Disk System)
8. High School! Kimengumi (Mark III)
9. Princess Tomato in the Salad Kingdom (NES)
10. Sindbad Mystery (SG-1000)
11. Steins;Gate (Vita)
12. Champion Boxing (SG-1000)
13. Squidlit (Switch eShop)
14. Skyblazer (SNES)
15. Tokyo Dark: Remembrance (Switch eShop)
16. Bubble Bobble (Famicom Disk System)
17. Steins;Gate Elite (Switch)
18. Johnny Turbo's Arcade: Joe and Mac Returns (Switch eShop)
19. Johnny Turbo's Arcade: Express Raider (Switch eShop)
20. Alex Kidd in the Enchanted Castle (Genesis)
21. Sword of Vermilion (Genesis)
22. Steins;Gate: My Darling's Embrace (Switch eShop)
23. Oink! (Atari 2600)
24. Bio Miracle Bokutte Upa (Famicom Disk System)
25. Super Castlevania IV (SNES)
26. Phantasy Star Online (Dreamcast)
27. Chaos;Child (Vita)
28. Scar of the Doll (Steam)
29. Kirby's Adventure (NES)
30. Rhapsody: A Musical Adventure (PlayStation)
31. Hangman (Atari 2600)
32. Metal Slug (Neo Geo MVS)

33. Metal Slug 2 (Neo Geo MVS)
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Playing through the Metal Slug series is a bit like plaything through the classic Mega Man NES games. In both cases, sequels were cranked out in quick succession, each one feeling almost like a heavily modified, but still undeniably similar, variant of the game released prior. Metal Slug 2 arrived less than two years after the original, and it's bigger, badder, and tougher than the debut. Strap in.

The core formula here remains the same. This is pure run and gun "shoot everything that moves" action, for one or two players. There are six stages (the last charmingly titled the "Final Mission"), each concluding with a massive bullet sponge boss. This time around, General Morden and his human henchmen have joined forces with extraterrestrials, this being the first Metal Slug game to feature more "extreme" and outlandish enemies. Weapon upgrades are provided upon the rescue of a hostage, and the roster of "Metal Slug" battle tanks has been greatly expanded. In addition to the hostages, there are a couple of additional NPCs who provide brief assistance, by either executing attacks or tossing out items.

There are now four playable characters to choose from, with a couple of ladies, Eri and Fio, added to the (former) boys club. I play as Fio. She's cute, she's cool, she's Italian, she wears glasses. Note that there's no actual mechanical differences between the characters, so just choose the one that looks the most appealing and blast away. Speaking of which, the portraits on the character selection screen are butt ugly and totally clash with the rest of the game's presentation. It's confounding.
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The stage design has been upped considerably, as Metal Slug 2 boasts a whole host of new environments. The journey commences in a somewhat culturally insensitive version of the Middle East, before moving forward into a cursed and ghoul-laden Egypt, hopping aboard a swiftly-moving train, making a pit stop in Asia, before launching upon a long trek through the urban hellscapes that characterized the first game. The same hordes of doofy human Morden underlings are back, but they're joined by all sorts of weirdos, like the shuffling mummies and gun-toting tentacled aliens that barf up green slime when injured.

Controls are identical to that of the first game, with the three-button attack/jump/bomb combination. Close-quarter combat sees protagonists and foes alike engage in knife melees. There's a new weapon, the laser gun, which emits an incredibly satisfying solid beam that absolutely disintegrates fiends from Earth and sky. As far as those fresh new "Slugs" go, the first is an actual camel with a Vulcan cannon attached. This is probably the most interesting ride in the game, as the player can still suffer a one-hit death while riding the camel exposed, and those finishing a stage with the camel will find it briefly journeying into the next environment (it bails on the player in Egypt, presumably it wants to reunite with its family). There's additionally a bouncing "Slugnoid" equipped for tower ascension, and a fighter jet that allows one player to "wing-walk" in the two-player mode.
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Bosses are significantly more interesting here in Metal Slug 2. There are the traditional "giant tank" battles, but also a massive "chomper" machine that chases our heroes up a building, a gun-toting madman that's eaten by an orca upon defeat, and a final boss alien mothership confrontation that's lifted straight from the film Independence Day. As if death weren't enough of a hazard, Metal Slug 2 injects "status effects" into the run and gun formula. Mummies can turn the protagonists into, well, other mummies, walking at glacial speeds and unable to fire most weapons. Antidotes can reverse this condition, though death is more likely to occur before one is found. There's also obesity: this is caused by consuming too much food (which typically only grants points) on a single life. Obesity causes a character to move slower, but humorously increases (or "beefs up" I suppose) attack power and even alters projectile sprites. Even better, the knife used for melee attacks is transformed into a (kitchen) knife and fork. "Diet powder" can eliminate this condition, as can simply moving around (exercise, in other words).

The graphics are once again hand-drawn and absolutely gorgeous. The soundtrack, which is ultimately comprised of tunes that appear in other Metal Slug games, is upbeat and riveting. The "announcer" is persistent and hilarious, and the heavily-accented "rocket lawnchair!" has since become a meme of sorts. Really, the only thing holding back Metal Slug 2 is its pervasive, crippling slowdown. The game slows to a crawl at the most inopportune times, leading to a number of cheap deaths and a general sense of frustration. The developers were kind enough to rectify this issue by releasing Metal Slug X, which uses a modified version of the engine seen in Metal Slug 3, removes slowdown, and introduces other various quality of life improvements. X may arguably be the "definitive" version of this game, though both variants are now widely available and it really only takes a little more than an hour to play though both Metal Slug 2 and Metal Slug X. In any event, Metal Slug 2 may be slow, but that doesn't stop it from also being quite excellent.
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PartridgeSenpai
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Re: Games Beaten 2020

by PartridgeSenpai Sat Jul 11, 2020 1:09 am

Partridge Senpai's 2020 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018 2019
* indicates a repeat

1. Invisigun Reloaded (Switch)
2. Human: Fall Flat (Switch)
3. Shantae: The Pirate's Curse (3DS)
4. Darksiders: Warmastered Edition (PC)
5. Splatterhouse (PS3) *
6. 3D Dot Game Heroes (PS3)
7. Tokyo Jungle (PS3)
8. Pictobits (DSiWare)
9. Puzzle Quest: The Legend Reborn (Switch)
10. WarioWare Gold (3DS)
11. Disaster: Day of Crisis (Wii)
12. Sleeping Dogs: Definitive Edition (Xbone)
13. Sleeping Dogs: Nightmare in North Point (Xbone)
14. Sleeping Dogs: Year of the Snake (Xbone)
15. Dynamite Headdy (Genesis) *
16. Shovel Knight: King of Cards (3DS)
17. Shovel Knight: Shovel of Hope (3DS) *
18. Shovel Knight: Plague of Shadows (Switch) *
19. Shovel Knight: Specter of Torment (Switch) *
20. Shovel Knight: Showdown (Switch)
21. Dragon Quest Builders 2 (PS4)
22. ActRaiser (SNES)
23. Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth (WiiWare)
24. Mega Man X (SNES)
25. Breath of Fire II (SNES)
26. Ape Escape 2 (PS2) *
27. Doubutsu No Mori+ (GC)
28. Ape Escape (PS1)
29. Ape Escape 3 (PS2) *
30. Maken X (DC)
31. Cubivore (GC)
32. Wario World (GC) *
33. Hatoful Boyfriend (PC)
34. Fire Emblem: Mystery of the Emblem (SFC)
35. Baku Bomberman 2 (N64)

36. Chameleon Twist (N64)

This is a game I picked up a while ago for a couple bucks and heard it was neat, and my ability to pick up more Bomberman games has been temporarily interrupted due to renovations at the place I usually buy them at, so I decided to go through this game in the meanwhile. I knew it was short, but I didn't really expect to finish it in just a little over an hour ^^;. Granted, I only did 4 out of 6 stages, but this is a super short game that albeit has a neat gimmick.

Chameleon Twist is a somewhat early N64 game with a very simple (although somewhat baffling) premise. You're a chameleon (the game has 4 different colors to pick from), just chilling out on a log, when a white rabbit right out of Alice in Wonderland hops past you and jumps into a weird, magical pot. You, being a chameleon with nothing better to do, I suppose, jump in after it, and transform into a little humanoid with a long chameleon tongue! The rabbit then proceeds to tell you to more or less get going with the adventure and leaves. You go through a few more stages, with the rabbit unlocking doors or giving you little hints about bosses here and there, but that's it for the story. Even calling it a "story" seems a bit generous. It's more like an incredibly general premise, but that isn't a bad thing.

The game is a 3D platformer that goes through 6 worlds of which you need to go through at least 4 (you gotta play at least world 2 or 3, and then again gotta play at least world 4 or 5). There aren't really meaningful secrets, but there are collectible crowns in each stage to do some platforming challenges for. Each world is a series of rooms and your goal is to get to the end and fight a boss. The bosses range in difficulty pretty significantly (I thought the stage 2 boss was pretty darn hard compared to the rest of them that I fought in worlds 1, 5, and 6), but it's far from insurmountable challenge, especially for the N64.

The game's main gimmick is your big chameleon tongue, which you can use to grapple onto poles from a distance, spin around on those poles, suck up enemies to then spit them out, or even shoot it directly downward to do a higher jump at somewhat of an angle. The game controls alright, but especially the fancy tongue-jumps take a while to get used to. There are also some timed platforming sections later on that can get pretty brutal, and the combat and platforming overall have a somewhat uneven difficulty curve, but you just restart the current room when you die, so it's not big deal even if you fail.

The music is quite good even though the graphics aren't terribly impressive. I suppose the biggest flaw with this game might also be its biggest draw: it's a very simple experience. Sure it controls kinda funky, but there's just not a lot of content here, so if you're into getting all the crowns or getting through the game as fast as you can, there can be a lot to enjoy here, but if you're looking for something to sink your teeth into over the entirety of a weekend (or even a whole afternoon), there just isn't a lot here.

Verdict: Hesitantly Recommended. Despite the fact that Bomberman gave me more frustration overall over a longer period of time, I would still recommend it over this game because at least Bomberman made me feel something XD. This game is just sorta "there," in a way that reminds me a bit of Snake Pass (although this game is way more actually enjoyable to play than Snake Pass is). It's very much just "a video game to be played" in a way that was of a dying breed in 1997, so it's somewhat remarkable in that regard, but it simply isn't my cup of tea at the end of the day. It's not a bad time, but it's so short and simple that I'd have difficulty recommending it if you had to pay more than a couple bucks for it.
I identify everyone via avatar, so if you change your avatar, I genuinely might completely forget who you are. -- Me
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prfsnl_gmr
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Posts: 11086
Joined: Mon Jun 01, 2009 10:26 pm
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina

Re: Games Beaten 2020

by prfsnl_gmr Sat Jul 11, 2020 9:51 am

First 30
1. Her Story (iOS)
2. Elminage Original (3DS)
3. Legend of Grimrock (iOS)
4. Silent Bomber (PS1)
5. Crash Bandicoot (PS1)
6. Bust-a-Move 2 Arcade Edition (PS1)
7. Transformers Cybertron Adventures (Wii)
8. Squidlit (Switch)
9. Sydney Hunter & The Curse of the Mayan (Switch)
10. Mega Man Legends (PS1)
11. Revenge of the Bird King (Switch)
12. Blossom Tales: The Sleeping King (Switch)
13. Gato Roboto (Switch)
14. Kamiko (Switch)
15. Night Slashers (Arcade)
16. Subsurface Circular (Switch)
17. Iconoclasts (Switch)
18. Wonder Boy Returns Remix (Switch)
19. Resident Evil 3 (PS1)
20. The Messenger (Switch)
21. The Messenger: Picnic Panic (Switch)
22. Samsara Room (iOS)
23. Heroes of the Monkey Tavern (Switch)
24. Sayonara Wild Hearts (Switch)
25. Gris (Switch)
26. Donut County (iOS)
27. Donkey Kong Country 2 (SNES)
28. Donkey Kong Country 3 (SNES)
29. Contra (Arcade)
30. Super Contra (Arcade)

31. Minesweeper Genius (Switch)
32. Kuso (Switch)
33. 20XX (Switch)
34. Spooky Ghosts Dot Com (Switch)
35. Aggelos (Switch)
36. Quell+ (iOS)
37. The White Door (iOS)

The White Door is the latest Rusty Lake adventure games. It’s more substantial than the free Cube Escape games, but not quite as meaty as Rusty Lake’s premium games (i.e., Rusty Lake Hotel, Rusty Lake Paradise, and Rusty Lake Roots). Still, like all of their games, it’s a sublime, surreal experience, that’s a lot of fun and loaded with secrets (which are often references to other Rusty Lake games). As a fan of their oeuvre, I enjoyed the game immensely, and I really can’t recommend this series highly enough. (The games are available on Android, iOS, and Steam, and many of them are free. Someone else on here should give them a shot!)
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PartridgeSenpai
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Posts: 2653
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2015 9:27 am
Location: Northern Japan

Re: Games Beaten 2020

by PartridgeSenpai Sat Jul 11, 2020 5:21 pm

Partridge Senpai's 2020 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018 2019
* indicates a repeat

1. Invisigun Reloaded (Switch)
2. Human: Fall Flat (Switch)
3. Shantae: The Pirate's Curse (3DS)
4. Darksiders: Warmastered Edition (PC)
5. Splatterhouse (PS3) *
6. 3D Dot Game Heroes (PS3)
7. Tokyo Jungle (PS3)
8. Pictobits (DSiWare)
9. Puzzle Quest: The Legend Reborn (Switch)
10. WarioWare Gold (3DS)
11. Disaster: Day of Crisis (Wii)
12. Sleeping Dogs: Definitive Edition (Xbone)
13. Sleeping Dogs: Nightmare in North Point (Xbone)
14. Sleeping Dogs: Year of the Snake (Xbone)
15. Dynamite Headdy (Genesis) *
16. Shovel Knight: King of Cards (3DS)
17. Shovel Knight: Shovel of Hope (3DS) *
18. Shovel Knight: Plague of Shadows (Switch) *
19. Shovel Knight: Specter of Torment (Switch) *
20. Shovel Knight: Showdown (Switch)
21. Dragon Quest Builders 2 (PS4)
22. ActRaiser (SNES)
23. Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth (WiiWare)
24. Mega Man X (SNES)
25. Breath of Fire II (SNES)
26. Ape Escape 2 (PS2) *
27. Doubutsu No Mori+ (GC)
28. Ape Escape (PS1)
29. Ape Escape 3 (PS2) *
30. Maken X (DC)
31. Cubivore (GC)
32. Wario World (GC) *
33. Hatoful Boyfriend (PC)
34. Fire Emblem: Mystery of the Emblem (SFC)
35. Baku Bomberman 2 (N64)
36. Chameleon Twist (N64)

37. Gato Roboto (PC)

This is a game I got for free on Twitch a while back, and I'd been putting off playing it for far too long given how much I love Metroidvanias. And you even get to play as an adorable kitty! I'd heard it was short but sweet, and that's exactly what I got, with it taking me a little over 2 hours to 100% the game.

In Gato Roboto, you play as Kiki, the cat of a galactic security soldier who steps on his console during a landing sequence and causes him to crash land onto the research station he was going to check out. Pinned within his own space ship, he has no choice but to send out Kiki to complete the mission in his sted with the help of a cat-sized suit of mech armor you find on the station! It's a cute, silly story that has "voice acting" very very much like Chibi-Robo. It doesn't take itself too seriously, but still manages to be silly-yet-engaging.

The gameplay is a more Metroid-y Metroidvania than a Castlevania-y one. You run around in your mech suit shooting your normal gun and you'll find more power-ups as you go through the game like missiles (which are on a cooldown timer, not a limited thing you need to collect more of, which is awesome), better bullets, better jumps, etc. You can search through 6 areas for both extra health packs as well as palette cartridges, which allow you to change the monochrome-palette of the game to all sorts of colors, from a more soft grey & black, to a harsher (and even fuzzier) Virtual Boy-like red & black, to even an absolutely nauseating Commodore 64-like blue & yellow XD

There are also sections where Kiki leaves her suit and is exposed to one-hit kills, and these are easily the most difficult parts of the game for obvious reasons. That said, the game overall is far from the most difficult Metroidvania I've played, while also not exactly being baby's first Metroidvania. The controls are really tight and the game is really fun to explore around and fight things in, even if the boss battles aren't the most exciting thing in the world.

Verdict: Highly Recommended. It's a short game, but it's oozing with character and solid gameplay. If you're someone without a lot of money to spend on games, you might not feel you're getting a ton of value for it, but if you just want an excellent time to spend an afternoon, this is a really great way to do it ^w^
I identify everyone via avatar, so if you change your avatar, I genuinely might completely forget who you are. -- Me
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