Replace a Nintendo 8-Bit NES 72-Pin Connector

 Kevin from UUDDLRLRBAStart has been generous enough to share a technique that owners of a classic Nintendo Entertainment System may find handy in order to keep their aging console running in peak condition.

Kevin writes,
“Any old school NES players will tell you they remember having to sometimes blow in the end of their NES cartridges to get them to work correctly. Usually when the cart was inserted and the unit was powered on you’d get a flashing screen on the TV and the NES unit would power on and off continuously. The long-standing theory was that the cartridge was dirty and blowing on it would remove the excess dust buildup on the pins inside. Blowing on the NES cartridge contacts is actually a bad thing. The enzymes in your saliva can actually cause corrosion to both the NES cart contacts and the 72-pin connector in the NES.

So what is the problem and how do we fix it?”

Check out his full article to learn how to make this modification. It is well-written and includes a number of photographs to help walk you though the process.

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5 Comments

  1. Vinícius says:

    WD-40 is amazing do clean old connectors! 🙂

  2. Mozgus says:

    This is indeed the ultimate fix for your NES. I’ve had mine since 1989 and it hasn’t once failed to start up since I replaced the 72 pin.

  3. Anonymous says:

    I would like to see this article, but it seems to now be a dead link….sigh.

  4. Widee says:

    yes, it does actually seem to be a very dead link… )=

  5. Widee says:

    i waaant to see it….very mucho