Guides to jumpstart your Retrogaming lifestyle
User avatar
CRTGAMER
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 11933
Joined: Tue Jan 05, 2010 11:59 am
Location: Southern California

Re: Game Cart Contact Cleaning Guide - Atari Sega Famicom NE

by CRTGAMER Fri Aug 21, 2015 10:05 pm

Ziggy587 wrote:
Cronozilla wrote:If the pin connector is a really large issue, I'd recommend looking into the BlinkingLightWin which is officially available. It solves all the connector issues.
I've never heard of that, but it looks awesome! So it's a replacement pin connector that pretty much turns the toaster into a top loader (or side loader, but same principle since you don't have to push down). Nice. I wanna try one out.

That looks like a great permanent fix. No more worn bent contacts from repeated Toaster action. However, the video demo at the sale site does not show REMOVING a cart with the top cover on. Just from seeing how the rear of the console has to be held when insert seating a game cart, a trick to remove the game due to the connecters no longer having ZIF (Zero Insertion Force) socket capability. This conversion seems to only work by swapping games with the top cover removed!

For me, the low mileage of NES game play (plus never leaving a cart in when not played) does not justify the mod due to the ZIF loss. Still, a great option for NES owners that run their console a lot.
Image
CRT vs LCD - Hardware Mods - HDAdvance - Custom Controllers - Game Storage - Wii Gamecube and other Guides:
CRTGAMER Guides in Board Guides Index: http://www.racketboy.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=1109425#p1109425

Image
Image
User avatar
Cronozilla
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 2610
Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2012 8:15 pm
Location: Oregon, USA.

Re: Game Cart Contact Cleaning Guide - Atari Sega Famicom NE

by Cronozilla Sat Aug 22, 2015 2:02 am

From what I've seen, getting games out is a bit tough, since the thing sits back where the original connector was.

It also includes a chip to eliminate the NES 10 functionality (without cutting any pins), as well as enabling all regions.

https://youtu.be/xP8Gvq7-IzM
Game Tech talking about it.
User avatar
Ziggy587
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 12273
Joined: Mon Jun 09, 2008 5:12 pm
Location: Long Island, NY

Re: Game Cart Contact Cleaning Guide - Atari Sega Famicom NE

by Ziggy587 Sat Aug 22, 2015 9:08 am

You know what might have been cool (but probably a lot of people wouldn't like) is if the cart slot was moved a lot closer to the front of the console. Maybe halfway. So NES carts, when inserted into the slot, half the cart would be sticking out of the console (and that's what a lot of people probably wouldn't like). But that would make it a LOT easier to remove NES carts. Also, since it has a lockout key permanently installed (that's what I'm assuming) that would mean Famicom carts would work with a simple pin adapter (that doesn't have it's own lockout chip). And since the cart slot would be moved forward, that would make using FC carts with adapters a little easier too.

Or... even more extreme! How about this for an idea: A similar replacement pin connector, but one that effectively turns the console into an actual top loader. It would come with a replacement top shell that would have a flap for the cart slot. It could even be made to have a built in FC cart adapter, and have two cart slots (one for NES and one for FC). Hell, I'd buy one.
Image
User avatar
BoneSnapDeez
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 18973
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 1:08 pm
Location: Maine

Re: Game Cart Contact Cleaning Guide - Atari Sega Famicom NE

by BoneSnapDeez Sat Sep 12, 2015 7:37 pm

Soldier Blue wrote:I hope someone can answer this question. I have some NES games that won't work because they seem to be missing the bottom part of the contacts that lead to the end of the PCB. I'm wondering what is the best and cheapest way to go about fixing the pins? Adding a bit of solder to them? Here are the pics..

Image



Image


My copy of Hydlide looks like this and is a bastard to get working. The Retron 5 refuses to read it completely. Weird....... Anyone know more about this?

EDIT: Just did some more testing with Hydlide.
Retron 5 can't dump ROM.
Won't work in my Sharp Twin Famicom with pin adapter.
Won't work in my Yobo clone system with cart death grip.
Only works in original front-loading NES!!!!
User avatar
racketboy
Site Admin
 
Posts: 9364
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 8:28 pm
Location: Michigan

Re: Game Cart Contact Cleaning Guide - Atari Sega Famicom NE

by racketboy Tue Dec 25, 2018 11:21 pm

Forgot to update that this guide was published as a guide on the main site:
https://www.racketboy.com/retro/game-ca ... -right-way

That being said, I'm personally having some frustrating experiences getting some of my NES carts to work well on my NT mini.

I've only really done some deep cleans on a few carts so far.

Gradius I did one round of cleaning with alcohol and also on round of eraser cleaning. It seemed to work flawlessly on the first try after cleaning.

Metal Storm ran flawlessly initially but then had some flickers to black screen and the occasional audio signal loss. This seemed to happen after I tried playing my Punch Out cartridge.

The Punch-Out cart has been scrubbed and scrubbed. I've probably taken it apart about 5 or 6 times now -- doing a good amount of eraser cleaning, alcohol, compressed air and back again multiple times. The contacts look super shiny, but maybe I'm missing something. A few cleanings ago, it would black out for a second or two at a time -- multiple times per match -- NOT good for Punch-Out unless you're one of those diehards that have the thing memorized. This last cleaning, I wasn't getting blackouts through a bout with Glass Joe, but I was getting some super quick black vertical lines showing and eventual loss of audio.

Any ideas of what I should try next and/or some info on if this is common? (I know the Nt Mini is picky, but didn't know it was THAT picky. My Super NT is rather picky, but I have much better success rate and I haven't hard to unassembled/eraser too many)

I'm trying to avoid scrub pads if I can -- it doesn't physically look that bad and I want to avoid abrasives.

Attached are recent pictures of the Punch-Out pins
Punch-Out-Cart-Contacts-2018-12-25-21.48.48.jpg
Do the contacts look clean?
Punch-Out-Cart-Contacts-2018-12-25-21.48.48.jpg (1.72 MiB) Viewed 1591 times
User avatar
Ziggy587
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 12273
Joined: Mon Jun 09, 2008 5:12 pm
Location: Long Island, NY

Re: Game Cart Contact Cleaning Guide - Atari Sega Famicom NE

by Ziggy587 Wed Dec 26, 2018 1:21 pm

One thing I've learned is just because it LOOKS clean doesn't mean it actually IS clean. But if you cleaned the pins on the cart a zillion times now and it's still not working perfectly, try cleaning the consoles cart slot pins now. After that, if the cart and slot pins are 100% clean (and the cart slot isn't damaged) and it still isn't working, then you're looking at another problem than dirty pins.
Image
User avatar
racketboy
Site Admin
 
Posts: 9364
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 8:28 pm
Location: Michigan

Re: Game Cart Contact Cleaning Guide - Atari Sega Famicom NE

by racketboy Wed Dec 26, 2018 1:35 pm

Ziggy587 wrote:One thing I've learned is just because it LOOKS clean doesn't mean it actually IS clean. But if you cleaned the pins on the cart a zillion times now and it's still not working perfectly, try cleaning the consoles cart slot pins now. After that, if the cart and slot pins are 100% clean (and the cart slot isn't damaged) and it still isn't working, then you're looking at another problem than dirty pins.


What’s some of the best way to clean the console pins. It’s a pretty new machine. Only used less than 10 times at this point.
User avatar
Ziggy587
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 12273
Joined: Mon Jun 09, 2008 5:12 pm
Location: Long Island, NY

Re: Game Cart Contact Cleaning Guide - Atari Sega Famicom NE

by Ziggy587 Wed Dec 26, 2018 2:22 pm

OK, I'll let the Internet in on a little secret. Do yourself a huge favor and grab the Universal Cleaning Kit by Performance.

https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R ... itleDesc=0

You have to go used or NOS because these things haven't been made since the 90's. But they are simply the BEST way to clean cart slots. FWIW, you can easily replicate this same method at home, but it's a lot easier to just buy something. Whether you buy new or used, the cleaning solution will probably long since evaporated. No bother, just use isopropyl alcohol (as close to 100% as you can).

If you look at the picture on the front of the box, the bottom-right corner are the cart slot cleaning tools. Nintendo carts have a different PCB thickness than Genesis, so important to use the right one on the right console. Anyway, the ends of them have this sort of vinyl material on the ends of them. You wet it with some alcohol, then insert it into the cart slot. Pull it out half way, then push it back in. Repeat this motion a number of time. When you pull it out, you should see some gunk on the end. If it's still wet with alcohol, you can easily wipe it off with a rag. Repeat this until you can pull it out and no more gunk appears (that's at least a good visual that the slot is relatively clean).

Again, look at the picture on the front of the box. The bottom-middle, those are this nifty cleaning wands for carts. It makes cleaning cart pins very easy without having to open the shell. Only use these if the pins are dirty to a minor degree. If they need some serious scrubbing, you're better off opening the cart and putting in the elbow grease. These little pads in the Performance kit will wear out fast if you try and use them on heavily corroded pins.

Again, look at the picture. The almost dead center is a white bottle. This is the "cleaning solution." Just to the left of that is another cleaning wand. This one is specially for the "Super FX pins" on a SNES (those extra pins on each side of the cart slot). To the left of that is some wacky thing that I've never used. Is it for cleaning CD lens? That's more easily done with some alcohol and a Q-Tip.

FWIW, the cleaning wands for the carts slots that are in this kit can easily be replicated at home. Replicating the shape isn't the hard part though. You want the perfect thickness. Too thin, you wont be cleaning the pins very well. Too thick and you can damage the slot. NES and SNES cart PCBs are 1.2mm thick, Genesis PCBs are 1.6mm thick. So you would want something that's pretty much that exact thickness.

Another home method would be cardboard. I remember some people suggesting use cereal boxes and stack layers until you get the desired thickness, then saturate it in alcohol.

But yeah, this kit from Performance has been my go-to kit for cleaning retro games and consoles for decades now. The only pain in the ass is the front loading NES. You can take the shell apart and clean the slot that way. Or just get a NES cleaning kit. But other than that, this kit is perfect. I've considered (perhaps with a Kickstarter) recreating this kit (and even improving on it slightly) to sell.
Image
Tanooki
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 6947
Joined: Sun Jul 06, 2014 5:06 pm

Re: Game Cart Contact Cleaning Guide - Atari Sega Famicom NE

by Tanooki Wed Dec 26, 2018 10:03 pm

I accidentally failed to notice this DS Hello KItty game I got for my daughter yesterday for Christmas wasn't working because of some green funk on the pins. The game, box, everything was pretty, but towards the tips of the pins the green went beyond the PCB over them and it wouldn't boot. I couldn't get it with alcohol so I had to use a very tiny cutting knife and was able to pop open the shell of the game about 1/2 way starting in the back. It took a little scraping and then magic eraser soaked in 91% alcohol but now it works like a champ with little showing for wear other than where the green discolored the pins a little bit on a few. At least that worked, and she's happy, plus I figured out how to safely pry one of those things open now since they're like heat/glue sealed at the factory.
User avatar
racketboy
Site Admin
 
Posts: 9364
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 8:28 pm
Location: Michigan

Re: Game Cart Contact Cleaning Guide - Atari Sega Famicom NE

by racketboy Thu Dec 27, 2018 9:09 pm

Ziggy587 wrote:One thing I've learned is just because it LOOKS clean doesn't mean it actually IS clean. But if you cleaned the pins on the cart a zillion times now and it's still not working perfectly, try cleaning the consoles cart slot pins now. After that, if the cart and slot pins are 100% clean (and the cart slot isn't damaged) and it still isn't working, then you're looking at another problem than dirty pins.


I haven't done the slot cleaning yet (although can a brand new system get contaminated that easily/quickly?)

But how do I know when I've done all the cleaning I can do or if I'm just beating a dead horse? I keep scrubbing but the same issues persist. Are there any visual imperfections I should look for? (especially to know which parts I should focus on cleaning more)
Return to Guides

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests