The Philosophy, Art, and Social Influence of games
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Alakhami
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Re: Video games and philosophy

by Alakhami Sat May 26, 2018 4:00 am

The Talos Principle takes inspiration from the christian philosophical idea of Logos and puts a slight oriental twist to it. Nier Automata is basically a distillation of existentialism philosophy (while at the same time being a critique of all of philosophy in general) whilst making you (I really suggest you do not read the spoiler since it's one of the biggest things that happen int he game which you REALLY should experience)
make a metaphoric boddhisattva oath by self immolation to free yourself from the burden of existence
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My youtube channel with in-depth game commentaries: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU63dc ... omkm9fhf1g
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ayumarcan
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Re: Video games and philosophy

by ayumarcan Mon Jan 07, 2019 6:20 am

I've once bumped into a theory that Hitman himself is a human (more or less human) form of Thanatos, the Death itself.
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Tempest
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Re: Video games and philosophy

by Tempest Sat Aug 10, 2019 6:09 am

DPCameron wrote:Philosophic principles are common in almost every game, just to varying degrees. In this respect, they are similar to films.

Mario has them, Kirby has them.

Mario draws from philosophy? Please elaborate.
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funk_Farmer
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Re: Video games and philosophy

by funk_Farmer Thu Aug 15, 2019 7:56 am

I guess the first Harvest Moon had some references to Shinto practices but overall I think it's about transcendentalism. The belief in the importance of the individual, cultivating yourself with nature, using it to understand the deeper workings of the world, and then contributing yourself to the community. Inheriting a run down farm and raising it into a self-sufficient piece of land. Believing in the goodness of people, meeting that special girl. Talking to and brushing cows, deep stuff like that. Self-Reliance by Ralph Waldo comes to mind. Invigorating yourself by invigorating nature.
A person could derive philosophy from lots of games. But yea, Mario and Kirby I can't think of anything.
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PartridgeSenpai
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Re: Video games and philosophy

by PartridgeSenpai Thu Aug 15, 2019 8:22 am

funk_Farmer wrote:A person could derive philosophy from lots of games. But yea, Mario and Kirby I can't think of anything.


At least for Mario, there's a fairly simple but present idea about how might doesn't make right. Bowser is powerful and can take what he wants, but his invasions are painted as selfish and evil. Bowser's ability to organize his kingdoms, inspire his soldiers, launch so many nearly successful invasions and kidnapping plots could be framed as virtuous, but they are decidedly not. His foul intentions are shown to overrule any merit his leadership abilities may otherwise give him. It's hardly Shakespeare, but it IS present (and I'm sure you could argue something similar for most Kirby villains, on some level).
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noiseredux
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Re: Video games and philosophy

by noiseredux Thu Aug 15, 2019 8:24 am

funk_Farmer wrote:I guess the first Harvest Moon had some references to Shinto practices but overall I think it's about transcendentalism. The belief in the importance of the individual, cultivating yourself with nature, using it to understand the deeper workings of the world, and then contributing yourself to the community. Inheriting a run down farm and raising it into a self-sufficient piece of land. Believing in the goodness of people, meeting that special girl. Talking to and brushing cows, deep stuff like that. Self-Reliance by Ralph Waldo comes to mind. Invigorating yourself by invigorating nature.


fantastic post!
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