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prfsnl_gmr
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by prfsnl_gmr Thu Sep 26, 2019 4:04 pm

noiseredux wrote:Looks like a rip-off of Fix It Felix.


:lol:

I was always disappointed that Fix It Felix, Jr. - which is actually a game - was not included with the Wreck It Ralph video games for the 3DS and Wii. Seems like it would have been a perfect extra feature.

Also, great review, Bone. The Intellivision rules. You’ve played the AD&D games for it, right?
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by noiseredux Thu Sep 26, 2019 4:12 pm

yup, agreed. We still have the Wii game I think. It's very "okay," while the leaked Fix It Felix was actually the way better game.
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PartridgeSenpai
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by PartridgeSenpai Sun Sep 29, 2019 8:11 pm

Partridge Senpai's 2019 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018
* indicates a repeat

1. Night Slashers (Switch)
2. Bye-Bye BOXBOY! (3DS)
3. GTA4: The Ballad of Gay Tony (Xbox 360)
4. Katamari Forever (PS3)
5. Detention (PS4)
6. Donkey Kong 64 (N64) *
7. OctoDad: Dadliest Catch (PS4) *
8. FlintHook (Switch)
9. God of War (PS4)
10. God of War HD (PS3)
11. Tiny Barbarian DX (Switch)
12. God of War 2 HD (PS3)
13. Starlink (Switch)
14. Shin Gundam Musou (PS3)
15. Battle & Get! Pokemon Typing DS (DS)
16. Banjo-Kazooie (N64) *
17. Super Mario 64: Rumble Edition (N64)
18. Mario Party 3 (N64) *
19. Paper Mario (N64) *
20. The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (SNES) *
21. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX (GBC) *
22. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages (GBC) *
23. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons (GBC) *
24. Yoshi's Island (SNES) *
25. Super Mario World (SNES) *
26. Super Mario RPG (SFC) *
27. Kaeru No Tame Ni Kane Wa Naru (GB)
28. Final Fantasy VI (SFC) *
29. Final Fantasy IV (SFC) *
30. Final Fantasy V (SFC)
31. Final Fantasy III (Famicom)
32. Mother 2 (SFC) *
33. Mother 3 (GBA) *
34. Hebereke (Famicom)
35. Donkey Kong Country 2 (SFC)
36. Donkey Kong Country 3 (SFC)
37. Donkey Kong Country (SFC) *
38. Wario's Woods (Famicom)
39. Paper Mario: Color Splash (Wii U)
40. Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam (3DS)
41. Luigi's Mansion (3DS) *
42. Paper Mario: Sticker Star (3DS)
43. Mario & Luigi Superstar Saga & Bowser's Minions (3DS)
44. Mario & Luigi: Bowser's Inside Story & Bowser Jr's Journey (3DS)

45. Tomato Adventure (GBA)

Given that this is the Japan-exclusive game Alpha Dream made for Nintendo before they made the first Mario & Luigi game, I went into this game expecting it to be an okay sort of proto-M&L experience. While to a certain degree that is absolutely true, I was nevertheless routinely surprised at how mechanically interesting and narratively clever this game was. It's not super long at only 15-ish hours, but it was still absolutely worth the time and the 700 yen I paid for it on the Wii U Virtual Console.

The story of Tomato Adventure is about Demiru, a little rabbit-like boy in a vegetable/food land of the Tomato Kingdom. While on a search for his girlfriend Pasaran's robot, she's kidnapped by the evil King Abira, who plans to use her energy to turn the kingdom from food into toys. Fighting through his 6 Super Kids one at a time, you aim to save your girlfriend with the help of some wacky friends you meet along the way. The story is fairly self-aware, irreverent, and silly, with a tone that struck me as something between an early 2000's gag anime and a Loony Toons cartoon. It's got a tone more irreverent and less serious than Superstar Saga, for example, and that combined with the relatively short length keep it from getting stale. Being a 2002 JRPG aimed at kids, it doesn't have any sort of serious message to get across, but its protagonists and antagonists were fun and silly enough that it kept the story interesting for me regardless.

The presentation is a bit of a mixed bag. I didn't have as much of a problem with this playing it on a wide-screen TV on my Wii U, but this game must've been a nightmare to play on the original GBA in 2002. Demiru is quite small on the screen, and the environments themselves tend to be very colorful and loud in their presentation. That on top of relatively small text made me routinely thankful to not be playing this on an unlit 3" GBA screen XD . The music is also really nothing to write home about. The boss themes are pretty nice, but there's only one or two, a standard battle theme, and then the final boss has not one but TWO unique tracks. Each area you go to has one or two themes for its main areas and dungeon parts respectively, but nothing really memeorable. The music and sound design sounds much closer to something like Pokemon Ruby & Sapphire than Superstar Saga in terms of quality and style (at least to my ears). Very much Early GBA Chic.

The gameplay is where the ideas that would go onto make Mario & Luigi start to really shine through though. There is no jumping or platforming the way the M&L games have in the overworld, and first strikes on enemies aren't a thing, but there are still environmental puzzles galore and no random encounters (enemies walk around and you touch them to initiate combat). This game has tons of puzzle and action mini-game segments that, while some are pretty pants, all tend to be very different and you'll rarely see something similar more than once. There are some that are so frustrating the game definitely would've benefited from an option to just skip them and move on after you'd failed a bunch, but that's difficult to reasonably expect from a game from 2002.

The combat, like M&L, revolves around fulfilling action commands around the "Gimmick" (literally what they're called) devices you find throughout the game. Demiru meets 3 party members over the course of his journey, and while only one of them can be active at a time (Demiru must always be in your party), each of them has their own gimmicks only they can use, with Demiru having the most as to give him more variety. The gimmicks themselves are subject to power creep pretty badly (really no reason not to at least try out new ones as you get them as they tend to be reasonably more powerful than your old ones), but none of their timed mini-games are the same. Some are quite similar, but no two are exactly alike, even between characters, although the instructions on how to perform their mini-games are sometimes quite annoyingly vaguely explained. The game rolls out the gimmicks pretty slow at the start as well as their related mechanics, and the game has a pretty dang slow and easy start in general, but you'll have dozens of gimmicks by the end of the game and the final boss or two really don't mess around.

Very similar to how Superstar Saga has difficulties for Bro Moves that you can increase to use less BP and deal more damage, you can change the difficulty of gimmick's action commands between battles to deal more damage at the risk of failing the command. It creates a neat risk/reward system that incentives getting really good at the newest gimmicks to do more damage. Additionally, very similar to what would be used for Mario & Luigi: Bowser's Inside Story's Bro Badge mechanics, you have "Incredible" points that you can build up by successfully completing gimmick action commands, and you build them up far faster by completing higher difficulty gimmick commands. You only unlock this feature once you get your first party member, but each of the 3 party members has two possible Incredible Actions they can do (one at 3/4ths Incredible bar, one at full bar) for different effects ranging from a full-party heal to massive AOE damage to your enemies. To balance this, each gimmick has a certain number of times you can use it before you need to use other of your 4 equipped gimmicks (you must have as many as you can equipped up to a maximum of 4), which balances out the risk/reward by encouraging you to use gimmicks you can complete reliably, and not just ones that do a lot of damage.

However, this is where that mechanic stumbles a bit. If you fail an action command JUST one time, your entire stock of Incredible points drops to 0, meaning you are punished pretty hard for not succeeding at an action command. There's also no way to practice action commands outside of real combat, meaning there's no way to tell for sure what a new gimmick's action command will be, let alone exactly how upping the difficulty of a certain gimmick will affect the possibility of its completion. One or two gimmicks (including Demiru's 4th acquired one) are entirely down to luck, which can make building up Incredible points super irritating if you lose your entire bar because you guessed wrong. Some have higher difficulties that are absurdly difficult and bordering on impossible to complete on purpose, and there were many I found I had no chance to complete even by accident on power levels past 4 (each has 7 levels of difficulty). This is further complicated by the strange way this game decides to do character leveling.

Leveling your actual character through combat only ups their speed and maximum health. Your defense is tied to the armor you're wearing, and you'll rarely find new armor outside of buying it at the new town's shop (although money is basically never an issue if you just fight everything you see like I did). And your attack power is tied entirely to the gimmick you're using, and gimmick power level is decided by 3 things: the specific gimmick (some are simply more powerful than others as their base power rating), the 1-7 action command difficulty you've chosen for that gimmick, and finally how much you've increased that gimmick's power through batteries.

There are 4 types of gimmicks and their action commands revolve around the theme of their type: Timing, Renda (button mashing), Speed (do commands within a time limit), and Dokidoki (basically an "Other" category, usually revolving around memorization and/or abject luck). You can find in chests and from enemy drops (and in the much later game, outright buy for large sums of money) batteries that will increase the power level of a gimmick. It can't be done infinitely, but it's a good way to make a gimmick you like continue its usefulness even when other newer gimmicks have higher base power levels. This also smartly incentivizes spreading out the types of gimmicks across the characters you use, as while you may be able to very reliably do the action commands for most button mashing gimmicks and speed ones, that means you'll have a ton of unused timing and dokidoki batteries and relatively underpowered overall gimmick strength. Ultimately, all this means that while you can't necessarily grind levels for more power, you can grind money to power up your favorite gimmicks for the end-game (and the final boss is a proper blighter, so you'll need them at max power, lemee tell ya). It also fortunately means that you aren't really punished that much for avoiding combat, since levels don't affect your overall power level that significantly (compared to traditional JRPGs at least).

Verdict: Highly Recommended. I was very pleasantly and regularly surprised by the quality of this game. The slow and very easy start had me a bit worried it'd be pretty boring, but I hit a stride around the first boss of the game that really had me hooked. While the last two dungeons go on for a bit too long, the game otherwise has really nice signposting and good overall pacing, and a nice difficulty curve to boot (although the highest spots of it are a bit weirdly high for a game that says its geared towards kids). This is now one of my favorite games Alpha Dream has done, and one of the Japan-exclusive games I've most enjoyed playing. It's absolutely worth your time with a fan translation or to help practice your Japanese ^w^
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Ack
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by Ack Mon Sep 30, 2019 2:42 pm

1. Dusk (PC)(FPS)
2. Project: Snowblind (PC)(FPS)
3. Soldier of Fortune: Platinum Edition (PC)(FPS)
4. Ziggurat (PC)(FPS)
5. Wolfenstein 3D: Ultimate Challenge (PC)(FPS)
6. Destiny 2 (PC)(FPS/RPG)
7. Destiny 2: Curse of Osiris (PC)(FPS/RPG)
8. Destiny 2: Warmind (PC)(FPS/RPG)

9. Destiny 2: Forsaken (PC)(FPS/RPG)
10. Star Wars: Rebel Assault (PC)(Rail Shooter)

11. Castle Werewolf (PC)(FPS)
12. Project Warlock (PC)(FPS)
13. Castle Crashers (PC)(Hack and Slash)
14. This Strange Realm of Mine (PC)(FPS)
15. BioShock Remastered (PC)(FPS)
16. BioShock 2 (PC)(FPS)
17. BioShock 2: Minerva's Den (PC)(FPS)

18. Blood (PC)(FPS)
19. Blood: Cryptic Passage (PC)(FPS)
20. Blood: Post Mortem (PC)(FPS)

21. Shadow Warrior (PC)(FPS)
22. Shadow Warrior: Twin Dragon (PC)(FPS)
23. Shadow Warrior: Wanton Destruction (PC)(FPS)

24. F.E.A.R. 2: Project Origin (PC)(FPS)
25. F.E.A.R. 2: Reborn (PC)(FPS)

26. Vampire: The Masquerade - Bloodlines (PC)(RPG)
27. Men of Valor (PC)(FPS)
28. Ultima III: Exodus (PC)(RPG)
29. Albedo: Eyes from Outer Space (PC)(Point and Click)

30. Midnight Ultra (PC)(FPS)
31. Amid Evil (PC)(FPS)
32. Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic (PC)(RPG)
33. Betrayer (PC)(Horror)

34. Borderlands 2: Commander Lilith & the Fight for Sanctuary (PC)(FPS/RPG)
35. Far Cry 2 (PC)(FPS)
36. Apocryph (PC)(FPS)
37. Eye of the Beholder III: Assault on Myth Drannor (PC)(RPG)

38. Menzoberranzan (PC)(RPG)
39. TimeShift (PC)(FPS)
40. Heretic Kingdoms: The Inquisition (PC)(RPG)
41. Shadowgate (PC)(Point and Click)

42. Might & Magic Book One (PC)(RPG)

I'm pretty sure it's a well known fact around here that I enjoy the Might & Magic series. However, I initially came into these games with the third entry during a Together Retro some years ago. While I have since ventured on through some of the series highlights as well as spin offs and even a fan release built using assets from the fourth and fifth titles, it never did quite sit right that I hadn't checked out the original and its follow up. Why not? Accessibility and childhood rental trauma. The first Might & Magic came out in 1986, and by the time I really got into RPGs, improvements had definitely been made in the genre's user experience. To add to it, I had memories of attempting to play this years ago after renting the NES port. I had no idea what I was doing at the time (in my defense, I was 7), and that made me concerned about being overwhelmed.

That said...one can't hide forever! The plan was to get through the first of the series and then port my party over to the sequel. While the second has its own share of issues, I'll get to that much later whenever I get around to beating it. But for now...Might & Magic Book One is a product of its era while also offering a fairly large and open world in which the player is only limited by the party's ability to survive. It's a fascinating world, built like a massive dungeon with walls that represent the forests, deserts, mountains, and glaciers that you travel through. Hell, the cover art on the box is even a completely accurate reconstruction of the world and gives hints to what can be found within. Considering it was 1986 when this game was released, and it was created and published by one guy, it's a hell of an impressive feat. John Van Caneghem has left an incredible legacy; while he isn't exactly in Richard Garriott territory, it would be remiss to say his work hasn't been crucial to the development of the WRPG and dungeon crawler.

The worst aspects of the first Might & Magic are fairly easy to sum up: a difficult beginning that will likely push some potential players away, a menu-heavy approach that may turn away more, a spell and item system that could have used some explanation, and a general sense of aimlessness in the world. You make progress yet don't necessarily feel like you do, but then it's an open world, so "progress" is at best loosely defined. Perhaps instead I should say that you never feel like you're actually running down the main storyline, partly because of a lack of direction, and partly because you can't be too sure that what you've uncovered isn't a part of it. That is at least in part because there is a lot hidden in M&M1's world, from secret monsters to special areas in dungeons or towns to crazy quests that don't receive much or even any explanation. You might disrupt a meeting of dragons or stumble across a crypt hidden in a town, fight in an underground arena, or free a prisoner from a castle, and you have no idea if any of it is actually putting progress towards your goal, which you also don't really know. Yet that's ok, because you're just going forward and continuing to explore, so you'll probably resolve much of what you have to do anyway, it just doesn't ever feel like there is much of a logical next step.

The truth is, of the things I've described, the aimlessness is the one thing that doesn't ever feel "manageable." Winning in the early part of the game feels like a crap shoot, but eventually you manage to survive enough fights and gather up enough gear that you encounter the tipping point and can start walking around. The general monsters you fight are less of a threat, and so long as you make sure to save your progress at inns constantly, you learn where the nasty stuff is and build yourself up. The spells, eventually you'll learn what's useful and what really isn't, and when you're strong enough, you starting making a habit of using certain ones. The sorcerer's Barkskin spell became something I always had active. The menus get better once you understand your way through them, and manipulating them becomes second nature to pass gear around or use objects. Of course, stats and instructions on gear and items would have been helpful, but some of this just requires experimenting in town. Get used to rebooting a lot.

What do you get in the meantime? Well, an actual adventure in a truly open world, even if it's one that requires a little imagination on the part of the player. From the very beginning, I could have wandered off to find one of the Great Beasts for the Wheel of Luck sidequest. They all would have stomped me and used the party's corpses for toothpicks, but I could still have done it. Walking between towns at first felt like a mad rush and then eventually became much easier, and I would sometimes just wander off and explore new areas for the fun of it, just to see what I could find. Perhaps there is treasure, or perhaps there is death, but either way, I learned something and saw some sights. Even when I beat the game, I was sure there was more to have tracked down and some things that were still cryptic, and that sense of discovery never left.

A fun fact: this game actively punishes you for playing as males, which was something I stumbled across as a kid in the NES port and made me wary to play it again. One of the game's towns, Portsmith, drains men at every town intersection. There is also a secret contained within the town that instantly annihilates males as well as a pool which changes your characters' gender in an instant. That town is the only place in the game where your character's sex plays any part (and I mean that as in physical, because gender identity or expression is never mentioned. You're simply operating off an F or M in each character's stat page). Alignment also matters for little beyond certain gear and potentially how you respond to prisoners, but for the most part, your party is made up of faceless individuals to whom you subscribe all attributes of personality. I brought one of all six classes, named after people on this forum as usual, and while I had opinions on who these characters were, they never actually exhibited any sort of sign about how the game world interpreted them. They were just blank pages for me to imagine and project onto, as featureless as the quest but open to my adventurous spirit.

Because I could project myself onto this world so easily, I had a wonderful time with Might & Magic Book One. I absolutely recommend it to fans of dungeon crawlers. It's not as "rudimentary" as something like Ultima, nor as brutal as something like Wizardry, even with the front loaded difficulty curve. This series is a sweet spot in terms of genre development, and I have found its entries generally accessible across the board. I highly recommend it to RPG fans who are curious about the early days but are wary to dip a toe into those often murky waters.
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by MrPopo Tue Oct 01, 2019 2:41 am

Yeah, when you look back at it Might & Magic 1 is really a marvel. It wasn't the first kid on the block, but they ended up being what can probably be called the best in its genre, at least up through the fifth entry (it starts to get fuzzier around the sixth entry when compared to contemporaries). It stands on the shoulders of the giants that came before, like Wizardry, and manages to do more without going overboard like Fate does (http://crpgaddict.blogspot.com/2017/02/ ... -game.html - to put those numbers in perspective, M&M1 and 2 are 80x64 in first person while Ultima IV is 256x256 overhead).

Might and Magic 2 does a little better job of letting you know there's a main quest and that you're progressing it, as I recall.
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Games Beaten: 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by ElkinFencer10 Tue Oct 01, 2019 10:34 am

Games Beaten in 2019 So Far - 55
* denotes a replay

January (12 Games Beaten)
1. Army Men 3D - PlayStation - January 1*
2. Ys I: Ancient Ys Vanished - NES - January 4
3. Mega Man - NES - January 6
4. Mega Man 2 - NES - January 6
5. Mega Man 3 - NES - January 6
6. Mega Man 4 - NES - January 7
7. Dr. Discord's Conquest - NES - January 7
8. Mega Man 5 - NES - January 26
9. Just Cause 3 - PlayStation 4 - January 26
10. Mega Man 6 - NES - January 27
11. Persona 5: Dancing in Starlight - Vita - January 27
12. Mobile Suit Gundam: Encounters in Space - PlayStation 2 - January 27


February (2 Games Beaten)
13. Earth Defense Force 5 - PlayStation 4 - February 2
14. Fallout 76 - PlayStation 4 - February 3


March (4 Games Beaten)
15. Octopath Traveler - Switch - March 2
16. Resident Evil 0 - PlayStation 4 - March 9
17. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered - PlayStation 4 - March 10
18. Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade - Game Boy Advance - March 30


April (3 Games Beaten)
19. Moemon - Game Boy Advance - April 5
20. Yoshi's Crafted World - Switch - April 10
21. Wargroove - Switch - April 26


May (8 Games Beaten)
22. Dragon's Dogma: Dark Arisen - Switch - May 5
23. Battlefield V - PlayStation 4 - May 9
24. Timespinner - PlayStation 4 - May 12
25. Earth Defense Force: Iron Rain - PlayStation 4 - May 17
26. Shenmue - PlayStation 4 - May 19
27. Xenosaga Episode I: Der Wille zur Macht - PlayStation 2 - May 26
28. Team Sonic Racing - Switch - May 29
29. Xenosaga Episode II: Jenseits von Gut und Böse - PlayStation 2 - May 30


June (5 Games Beaten)
30. Xenosaga Episode III: Also Sprache Zarathustra - PlayStation 2 - June 2
31. Gato Roboto - Switch - June 3
32. Katana Zero - Switch - June 4
33. The Walking Dead: Survival Instinct - Wii U - June 8
34. Dark Savior - Saturn - June 12


July (12 Games Beaten)
35. The Elder Scrolls V: Skryim - Switch - June 7
36. The Elder Scrolls V: Skryim: Dragonborn - Switch - June 7
37. The Elder Scrolls V: Skryim: Dawnguard - Switch - June 7
38. Tiny Troopers - Switch - July 8
39. Tiny Troopers 2: Special Ops - Switch - July 8
40. Persona Q2: New Cinema Labyrinth - 3DS - July 10
41. Super Robot Wars T - Switch - July 13
42. Super Mario Maker 2 - Switch - July 13
43. Command and Conquer - Saturn - July 16
44. Command and Conquer: Covert Operations - PC - July 16
45. Super Neptunia RPG - PlayStation 4 - July 18
46. My Girlfriend is a Mermaid!? - Switch - July 19


August (5 Games Beaten)
47. Fire Emblem: Three Houses - Switch - August 10
48. Wolfenstein Youngblood - Xbox One - August 24
49. Fire Emblem: New Mystery of the Emblem - DS - August 27
50. Metal Wolf Chaos XD - PlayStation 4 - August 31
51. Fire Emblem: Archanean War Chronicles - SNES - August 31


September (4 Games Beaten)
52. Golf Story - Switch - September 2
53. Red Dead Redemption - PlayStation 3 - September 7
54. Far Cry 4 - Xbox One - September 14
55. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening - Switch - September 23


55. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening - Switch - September 23


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Link's Awakening is one of the games I see frequently mentioned in discussions of favorite Zelda games, but despite having the Game Boy Color re-release of the original, Link's Awakening DX, I never got around to playing it. I know it's one of the defining games of the original Game Boy's library, but I just never seemed to find the time. With such a beautiful and exciting remake being released on Switch, though, I decided it was high time that I experience this classic action adventure game for myself.

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Link's Awakening's intro sees Link at sea during a storm. This storm ends up destroying his boat, causing him to wash ashore a mysterious island. He soon learns that the island is protected by a Wind Fish, and that in order for anyone to leave the island, the Wind Fish must be awakened. There's a prophecy, however, that if the Wind Fish is awakened, the island and all of its inhabitants will cease to exist. What is Link to do? Escape the island to return to Princess Zelda's side and risk ending the island and everyone who calls it home, or resign himself to staying on the monster infested island forever to protect the villagers living there? It's quite the moral quandary, and the only way to unravel the mystery of the island is to trudge along your quest and discover its secrets.

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It seems pretty clear from the success of Breath of the Wild and the statements from Nintendo since that game's release that most if not all of the future Zelda games will be much more open ended than the traditional linear Zelda games, but Link's Awakening is an exception to that. This is a virtually perfectly faithful recreation of the original Game Boy game while still including modern quality of life improvements and upgrading the visuals from 8-bit pixel sprites to full HD models. The game itself, however, keeps a 2.5D perspective so as to stay more faithful to the original, and the effort to which the development team went to recreate the original Game Boy world perfectly is astounding. It's truly a testament both to the developer's dedication to the original game's legacy as well as to the importance that the original Link's Awakening had on the action-adventure genre as a whole.

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In a lot of ways, this game is a major feather in the Switch's cap. As I mentioned, the world is perfectly recreated, and the visuals are absolutely beautiful. The glossy, plastic toy-like appearance of the world and character models fits perfectly, and the music really feels like what those 8-bit tunes would have been had they been created 25 years later. Not all is perfect, though, and while I found them to be only a minor inconvenience, there are some performance issues that have caused a lot to grief to some more perceptive players. The frame rate is the biggest issue. Normally, the game keeps a pretty solid 60 fps, but during area transitions, there's a consistent albeit very brief drop to 30 fps before jumping back to 60 fps. This didn't detract from the experience for me personally, but it was rather jarring especially at first. In addition, there are occasions with either a lot of enemies on screen or a lot of effects like fire or dust that will cause some minor slowdown. Again, it's nothing that I personally to be a major impact on the experience, but opinions online differ wildly, so it's definitely something worth noting.

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There is one very important addition that was made to the game that I'd be remiss not to gush about a little, and that's the dungeon creator. There's a totally optional side feature that lets you create your own Zelda dungeons and run through them. Given the square room grid nature of Link's Awakening's dungeons, it's basically a matter of taking pre-created rooms and arranging them like puzzle pieces. With the various bosses, mini-bosses, chests, locked doors, etc, this opens up a lot of options for some really creative and challenging dungeons. It feels a lot like the kind of creative outlet that Super Mario Maker provided, and I REALLY hope that this is a testing-the-waters prelude to a full fledged Legend of Zelda Maker game because honestly, I had more fun with that than I did the actual game itself.

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The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening is an absolute marvel, and while it's certainly not perfect, it's an exceptionally good time and a fantastic experience that I consider to be a non-negotiable must-play for Switch owners. For those who loved the Game Boy original, it's an extremely faithful homage while still bringing modern QoL improvements to the game, and for those who, like me, never experienced the original Game Boy version of the game, it's a great way to experience one of the truly beloved Zelda adventures. Some folks I know have said that $60 is a steep asking price for a remake, and I can't entirely disagree with that, but it's my humble opinion that this is a remake impressive enough in both its accuracy to the original and in its improvements over the mechanical limitations of the original that it's a fair asking price all things considered. If you're a fan of the Legend of Zelda's traditional dungeon-based adventure formula, you'd seriously be doing yourself a disservice not to gives this one a go.
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by noiseredux Tue Oct 01, 2019 11:12 am

I think it looks gorgeous. And I've loved that game since it was originally released - even played through it on the original Nintendo Switch (IE: SNES Super Game Boy). That said, I do feel like $60 is steep. Maybe not "in general," but for my own limited budget right now. And given that the original is available on the 3DS Virtual Console for like a tenth of the price, it makes it even harder purchase for me.

But hey, glad you played Link's Awakening. It's awesome, and my favorite of the GB/GBC Zelda games.
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by ElkinFencer10 Tue Oct 01, 2019 2:04 pm

noiseredux wrote:I think it looks gorgeous. And I've loved that game since it was originally released - even played through it on the original Nintendo Switch (IE: SNES Super Game Boy). That said, I do feel like $60 is steep. Maybe not "in general," but for my own limited budget right now. And given that the original is available on the 3DS Virtual Console for like a tenth of the price, it makes it even harder purchase for me.

But hey, glad you played Link's Awakening. It's awesome, and my favorite of the GB/GBC Zelda games.

Gunstar said something similar in Slack, and that's totally fair. For me between my love of Switch collecting, my love of Zeldas a series, and the fact that it was a new experience for me, it was well worth the $60, but I can definitely understand those who disagree especially considering the original's 3DS release. I do plan to play the original release on GBC at some point though.
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by PartridgeSenpai Wed Oct 02, 2019 5:01 am

ElkinFencer10 wrote:
noiseredux wrote:I think it looks gorgeous. And I've loved that game since it was originally released - even played through it on the original Nintendo Switch (IE: SNES Super Game Boy). That said, I do feel like $60 is steep. Maybe not "in general," but for my own limited budget right now. And given that the original is available on the 3DS Virtual Console for like a tenth of the price, it makes it even harder purchase for me.

But hey, glad you played Link's Awakening. It's awesome, and my favorite of the GB/GBC Zelda games.

Gunstar said something similar in Slack, and that's totally fair. For me between my love of Switch collecting, my love of Zeldas a series, and the fact that it was a new experience for me, it was well worth the $60, but I can definitely understand those who disagree especially considering the original's 3DS release. I do plan to play the original release on GBC at some point though.


If the Switch were in more of a fallow period right now, then I'd probably have less issue with the $60 price tag. But with the sheer volume of AAA exclusive games that have already come out in the second half of the year (Fire Emblem, DxM Astral Chain), let alone everything yet to come (Luigi's Mansion 3, Town, Pokemon Sword/Shield), $60 is a pretty steep asking price for what is self-admittedly a significantly prettied up Gameboy game. That on top of the 3DS rerelease that's been out for ages for a much cheaper price as well as the plethora of other games by 3rd parties (both indie and AAA) coming to Switch all the time makes me definitely understand why so many (myself included) are giving a pass on Link's Awakening, particularly at a $60 asking price.
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by ElkinFencer10 Wed Oct 02, 2019 11:23 am

Games Beaten in 2019 So Far - 57
* denotes a replay

January (12 Games Beaten)
1. Army Men 3D - PlayStation - January 1*
2. Ys I: Ancient Ys Vanished - NES - January 4
3. Mega Man - NES - January 6
4. Mega Man 2 - NES - January 6
5. Mega Man 3 - NES - January 6
6. Mega Man 4 - NES - January 7
7. Dr. Discord's Conquest - NES - January 7
8. Mega Man 5 - NES - January 26
9. Just Cause 3 - PlayStation 4 - January 26
10. Mega Man 6 - NES - January 27
11. Persona 5: Dancing in Starlight - Vita - January 27
12. Mobile Suit Gundam: Encounters in Space - PlayStation 2 - January 27


February (2 Games Beaten)
13. Earth Defense Force 5 - PlayStation 4 - February 2
14. Fallout 76 - PlayStation 4 - February 3


March (4 Games Beaten)
15. Octopath Traveler - Switch - March 2
16. Resident Evil 0 - PlayStation 4 - March 9
17. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered - PlayStation 4 - March 10
18. Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade - Game Boy Advance - March 30


April (3 Games Beaten)
19. Moemon - Game Boy Advance - April 5
20. Yoshi's Crafted World - Switch - April 10
21. Wargroove - Switch - April 26


May (8 Games Beaten)
22. Dragon's Dogma: Dark Arisen - Switch - May 5
23. Battlefield V - PlayStation 4 - May 9
24. Timespinner - PlayStation 4 - May 12
25. Earth Defense Force: Iron Rain - PlayStation 4 - May 17
26. Shenmue - PlayStation 4 - May 19
27. Xenosaga Episode I: Der Wille zur Macht - PlayStation 2 - May 26
28. Team Sonic Racing - Switch - May 29
29. Xenosaga Episode II: Jenseits von Gut und Böse - PlayStation 2 - May 30


June (5 Games Beaten)
30. Xenosaga Episode III: Also Sprache Zarathustra - PlayStation 2 - June 2
31. Gato Roboto - Switch - June 3
32. Katana Zero - Switch - June 4
33. The Walking Dead: Survival Instinct - Wii U - June 8
34. Dark Savior - Saturn - June 12


July (12 Games Beaten)
35. The Elder Scrolls V: Skryim - Switch - June 7
36. The Elder Scrolls V: Skryim: Dragonborn - Switch - June 7
37. The Elder Scrolls V: Skryim: Dawnguard - Switch - June 7
38. Tiny Troopers - Switch - July 8
39. Tiny Troopers 2: Special Ops - Switch - July 8
40. Persona Q2: New Cinema Labyrinth - 3DS - July 10
41. Super Robot Wars T - Switch - July 13
42. Super Mario Maker 2 - Switch - July 13
43. Command and Conquer - Saturn - July 16
44. Command and Conquer: Covert Operations - PC - July 16
45. Super Neptunia RPG - PlayStation 4 - July 18
46. My Girlfriend is a Mermaid!? - Switch - July 19


August (5 Games Beaten)
47. Fire Emblem: Three Houses - Switch - August 10
48. Wolfenstein Youngblood - Xbox One - August 24
49. Fire Emblem: New Mystery of the Emblem - DS - August 27
50. Metal Wolf Chaos XD - PlayStation 4 - August 31
51. Fire Emblem: Archanean War Chronicles - SNES - August 31


September (5 Games Beaten)
52. Golf Story - Switch - September 2
53. Red Dead Redemption - PlayStation 3 - September 7
54. Far Cry 4 - Xbox One - September 14
55. Muv-Luv Extra - Vita - September 19
56. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening - Switch - September 23


October (1 Game Beaten)
57. Muv-Luv Unlimited - Vita - October 1


56. Muv-Luv Extra - Vita - September 19
57. Muv-Luv Unlimited - Vita - October 1

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Muv-Luv was a definitely surprise hit for me. I love me a good visual novel, especially when it's a cute slice of life/waifu visual novel, but this one was all that and more. After I read bone's GLOWING review of it, I knew it wasn't a game I could pass up, and even as high as my expectations were going in, every single one was smashed and surpassed.

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Muv-Luv is actually broken into two stories. The first, Muv-Luv Extra, is what I expected to find here - a cute slice of life waifu story. Takeru, the protagonist, grows up next to his adorable girl-next-door childhood friend, Sumika, but then suddenly this hella rich big tiddy blue hair waifu named Meiya shows up randomly in his bed one morning, and WOAH commence typical harem romantic comedy story. There are, of course, more potential waifus than just those two. OBVIOUSLY Sumika is best girl because of the Childhood Friend Corollary to the Intergenre Waifu Conventions which clearly states:

While not automatically Best Girl, when the archetype is present and the option given, the Childhood Friend™ must be the chosen waifu for any anime-styled game. Possible exceptions to this requirement are cases of realistic hairstyles and/or colors, malicious personalities, and character gender depending on the personal romantic preference of the player.


The great thing about Muv-Luv is that there's not really a "bad" girl to pick as your Best Girl, but it's pretty clear that the two "canon" choices, so to speak, are Sumika or Meiya. It's a solid 30 or 40 hour experience through the game for one playthrough depending on your reading speed, but there are multiple endings depending on who you choose as your waifu, and it's pretty much guaranteed to hurt your feelings at some point because all of the girls are so cute, and you just want to make them all your beloved waifu. Of course, that's not an option either within the mechanics of the game or within the limitations of Waifu Law; after all, more than one waifu will wreck your laifu.

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The second half of the game, Muv-Luv Unlimited, marks an abrupt shift in tone. It takes place shortly after the events of Muv-Luv Extra although your waifu choice does not appear to be taken into account, and Takeru is still the protagonist, but he wakes up to a world that just seems....off. Sumika is nowhere to be seen. Meiya is nowhere to be seen. The world outside his house has, somehow, become a barren wasteland, the only clue being a wrecked mobile suit of some kind crashed into where Sumika's house should be. Obviously, Takeru's immediate assumption is that he's dreaming. He walks through this would-be dreamscape carefree, wandering to the school only to find it guarded by armed United Nations soldiers. From there, reality begins to sink in for him that somehow he's not in the same world he was when we went to sleep.

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The overall experience in Muv-Luv Unlimited is very similar to Muv-Luv Extra. It's still a visual novel, and it's still all about picking your waifu, but the tone is dramatically different. The world in which Takeru finds himself is much darker and more desperate than the world into which he was born, and the story's tone is appropriately darker and more serious than in Extra. Most the characters return from Extra; pretty much everyone is there except Sumika, who is depressingly absent; but in her place is a mysterious but adorable girl named Kasumi. Unlimited is definitely not a feel-good cutesy story like Extra was, but it's told so well that it's every bit as compelling. Most folks would actually probably find Unlimited to be the more compelling of the two, but since I'm a neckbeard weeb, but I love the cutesy waifu stuff.

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I absolutely loved Muv-Luv. From the moment I read David's thoughts on it, I knew that this was a game that I NEEDED to play. Extra and Unlimited may be totally different in tone and mood, but they're connected so well that it feels both jarring and natural at the same time for one to follow the other immediately. Very few stories I've read or experienced can pull off that abrupt an atmosphere shift, but the fact that Muv-Luv does it so well is, in my view, a testament to the quality of its writing and character development. If you flat out dislike visual novels, there still may not be much here for you, but it's no exaggeration that this is one of the most excellently written and thoroughly enjoyable visuals novels I've ever played through. The story itself can take a little time to pick up, but the characters are likable enough to keep players hooked until the story really sinks its teeth in. No exaggeration, this is probably my all-time favorite visual novel. I understand folks who just don't like reading a game, so to speak, but if you're at all into or even curious about the genre, check out Muv-Luv. It's an immensely rewarding experience.
Exhuminator wrote:Ecchi lords must unite for great justice.

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