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MrPopo
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by MrPopo Fri May 03, 2019 12:19 am

I'll be honest, I read that as "Dragon Quest V is a terrible fighting game" and I was thinking "this is a true sentence, but a weird one."
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Games Beaten: 2015 2016 2017 2018
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prfsnl_gmr
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by prfsnl_gmr Fri May 03, 2019 7:56 am

MrPopo wrote:I'll be honest, I read that as "Dragon Quest V is a terrible fighting game" and I was thinking "this is a true sentence, but a weird one."


:lol:

It’s still a better fighting game than Double Dragon V!
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by Flake Fri May 03, 2019 9:04 am

January Games:
Megaman (Switch)
Megaman 2 (Switch)
Megaman 3 (Switch)
Megaman 4 (Switch)
Megaman 5 (Switch)
Megaman 6 (Switch)
Megaman 7 (Switch)
Megaman 8 (Switch)
Megaman 9 (Switch)
Megaman 10 (Switch)
Kirby's Dreamland (Wii)
Time Spinner (PS4)

February Games:

Megaman Legends (PSTV)
The Misadventures of Tron Bonne (PSTV)
Donkey Kong Country Returns (Wii)

March Games:

Metroid: Samus Returns (3DS)
Mario Galaxy (Wii)

April

Batman: Arkham Asylum (PS4)

May

Shovel Knight: Shovel of Hope (Switch)

Shovel Knight is pretty awesome. The Treasure Trove is one of the first games I purchased when the Switch came out - but for some reason I played it in bits and pieces. I think I eventually beat it but it wasn't a very good approach to experiencing the title. This time I did it the right way and really focused on it.

A few thoughts: Yacht Club made incredibly wise decisions on what elements they lifted wholesale from Megaman, Zelda 2, and Duck Tales. It's the difference between being influenced by or derivative of. So you have the Zelda 2 style towns but only 2 of them - making for a tidier presentation that the player can connect to better. Instead of each Knight having a specific weakness, the 'special weapons' are used to let you figure out how you want to play. The result is just a fantastic experience that is a joy to play with a great difficulty curve and modern quality of life features. The music is worth mentioning to - it really is a great throwback to old NES chiptunes.

Next, I'll probably move on to Plague Knight's game - I'd like to see how they adapt the existing levels and bosses for such a different style of play.
The PSTV is amazing.
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PartridgeSenpai
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by PartridgeSenpai Sat May 04, 2019 12:32 am

Partridge Senpai's 2019 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018
* indicates a repeat

1. Night Slashers (Switch)
2. Bye-Bye BOXBOY! (3DS)
3. GTA4: The Ballad of Gay Tony (Xbox 360)
4. Katamari Forever (PS3)
5. Detention (PS4)
6. Donkey Kong 64 (N64) *
7. OctoDad: Dadliest Catch (PS4) *
8. FlintHook (Switch)
9. God of War (PS4)
10. God of War HD (PS3)
11. Tiny Barbarian DX (Switch)
12. God of War 2 HD (PS3)
13. Starlink (Switch)
14. Shin Gundam Musou (PS3)
15. Battle & Get! Pokemon Typing DS (DS)
16. Banjo-Kazooie (N64) *

17. Super Mario 64: Rumble Edition (N64)

Another 250 yen pick up from a day or two ago. A version of the game I'd always thought about picking up because of the gimmick of the Rumble Pak compatibility, and here I am without a Rumble Pak to actually test it with XD. Though this is technically a game I thiiiink I've finished on the N64 before, it's been SO long that other than my memory of most stages, I don't feel that familiar with the game. My most recent memory of it is the DS port that I played along the time it came out, and it's difficult to separate the memory of the two versions in my head XP . It's definitely a game that PLAYS way different than I remember, and this is the first time I've ever actually gotten all 120 stars on the N64 version, so I feel an exception is warranted from being a * repeat completion like Banjo-Kazooie was.

As far as what the game is, it's Mario 64. Chances are, you know what that is. A major pioneer of modern 3D movement in games and especially the 3D collectathon genre as a whole. 15 courses with 7 stars each, a castle hub area with 15 stars hidden in it as well, and 3 big Bowser fights before you reach the end. One of the all-time classics of the N64 that really doesn't need any serious introduction.

That said, the game certainly plays more like a pioneer in the genre and less flawlessly than I remember. This game is HARD to control after going through Banjo-Kazooie a few days ago, and even harder since it controls so differently from any other Mario game I've played recently. It honestly made me kinda wanna pick up a GameCube and Mario Sunshine just to refresh my memory on how well that game controls compared to this, because while I certainly remembered always preferring the Banjo games to Mario 64 as a kid, I definitely didn't remember exactly why. Now I have a pretty good idea: The controls.

Mario 64 is somewhat of a victim of its own success. All the other great 3D platformers that have come since, largely from Nintendo, have refined Mario's move-set in a way that has made his platforming far more forgiving. However, in this originator, a factor of three things make this game pretty difficult to go back to:

1. The camera is sometimes alright, but if you want to control it you're gonna have a BAD time. You GOTTA try and play like you can't even control it, because it doesn't wanna be controlled.

2. Mario's turning circle is HUGE. If you wanna turn around, he's gonna make a huge circle in front of him unless he's at a dead stop and you turn a very specific way. This means you're gonna be falling off of the game's MANY tiny platforms A LOT (into its uncountable bottomless pits), especially when the camera isn't behaving and forward is suddenly making you go right.

3. Swimming and flying are terrible and annoying. Not too related to #2, but it makes getting around that much more annoying in a game with tons of water to swim through and enough stars that involve flying to really rub it in your face how irritating the flight controls are compared to something simple like Banjo-Kazooie's flying.

All those gripes aside, they only REALLY come into play, I think, when going for a 120-star run. The game only actually requires you to get 70 out of 120 stars, of course, but I never really appreciated what that meant until I played through it this time. Each of the 15 courses has 7 stars in it, and the main castle has 15 stars hidden in it (some more difficult to get than others). That means it's technically possible to beat the whole game while only visiting 8 of the 15 worlds! This combined with the fact that it's so easy to sequence-break the order you get stars in in stages really gives the player a degree of choice and freedom in choosing which challenges they want to take on and which they don't. You don't even really get anything for getting them all other than some slightly different final dialogue from Bowser at the end and the ability to go and meet Yoshi on top of the castle. It frames getting EVERY star as what it really is: A challenge only to be taken on by the truly daunting that is a reward in and of itself.

Given how many prior Mario games allowed you to skip large swaths of content through things like warps and the Star Road, it certainly wasn't a huge design choice-leap to give the player such choice in which stages they want to play in Mario 64, but it's a design choice I've really only truly appreciated this time through. Nintendo really has always been trying to give players the agency to play through their games in the way the player would prefer. It isn't some super recent revelation with the era of the Wii and such.

As far as differences from the original N64 release of Mario 64 go, I guess you could say this is the "definitive" edition in a certain way for Japanese players. It apparently irons out some bugs and glitches present in the original release, while also confusingly enough removing Japanese dialogue and replacing it with the English voice overs from the international release. All of Peach's dialogue, for example, is in English with Japanese subtitles. It's an interesting curiosity if you just want a rumble gimmick added to the American version of Mario 64 you're more familiar with, as far as importing is concerned (granted all the text is still in Japanese, so I hope you don't need to read anything to get through this if you did wanna import it XD).

Verdict: Hesitantly recommended. The hesitant part of my recommendation is really down to my personal tastes. This isn't really a game I'm dying to play more of after my often frustrating experience going through it this time (especially with some of those later 100 coin stars XP), and the DS port adds SO much content and tightens up the controls so much that there's even a simply better (in many ways) version of this game I can far more easily recommend. It is an interesting historical piece that is very notable for the innovations in 3D platforming it presented, but Nintendo's many refinements on its formula have really made it start to show its age on its original hardware.
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by ElkinFencer10 Sun May 05, 2019 10:15 pm

Games Beaten in 2019 So Far - 21
* denotes a replay

January (12 Games Beaten)
1. Army Men 3D - PlayStation - January 1*
2. Ys I: Ancient Ys Vanished - NES - January 4
3. Mega Man - NES - January 6
4. Mega Man 2 - NES - January 6
5. Mega Man 3 - NES - January 6
6. Mega Man 4 - NES - January 7
7. Dr. Discord's Conquest - NES - January 7
8. Mega Man 5 - NES - January 26
9. Just Cause 3 - PlayStation 4 - January 26
10. Mega Man 6 - NES - January 27
11. Persona 5: Dancing in Starlight - Vita - January 27
12. Mobile Suit Gundam: Encounters in Space - PlayStation 2 - January 27


February (2 Games Beaten)
13. Earth Defense Force 5 - PlayStation 4 - February 2
14. Fallout 76 - PlayStation 4 - February 3


March (4 Games Beaten)
15. Octopath Traveler - Switch - March 2
16. Resident Evil 0 - PlayStation 4 - March 9
17. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered - PlayStation 4 - March 10
18. Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade - Game Boy Advance - March 30


April (3 Games Beaten)
19. Moemon - Game Boy Advance - April 5
20. Yoshi's Crafted World - Switch - April 10
21. Wargroove - Switch - April 26


21. Wargroove - Switch - April 26

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Every now and then, a game comes along that defies all of your expectations. Wargroove is one such game for me. This game hits three items on my "Shit That Makes A Game Great" checklist - a strong female protagonist, solid strategy gameplay, and a dog. The last one, obviously, is the most important; at no point has there ever been a game featuring a dog that I didn't love. Not only does Wargroove have a dog, but the dog is a general who inspires his troops to feats of valor and justice with this stalwart bravery and his floofy charisma. Truly Caesar exemplifies the best that pupperkind has to offer.

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If you've ever played Advance Wars or Famicom Wars, then you basically know how Wargroove plays already. I've seen a lot of people draw comparisons online with Fire Emblem, and that makes sense given that Fire Emblem is more popular than Advance Wars in the West these days, but Fire Emblem is really not the best comparison because it's not an SRPG. Your units don't level up, and aside from the commanders, they don't have unique names or personalities. You do, however, get to build up resources every turn and create new units and take cities and shit like Advance Wars. The way I've described Wargroove to friends is the gameplay of Advance Wars crossed with the basic setting of Fire Emblem crossed with the humor of slapstick comedy.

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There are a couple different of game modes in Wargroove. In addition to the campaign, you've got the standard multiplayer as well as a sort of survival thing called "arcade mode" where you have to pick a commander and clear five random maps in a row. The last game mode is a puzzle mode where you're given one turn to complete a certain objective - usually either defeat an enemy commander or get a specific unit to a specific spot on the map. Puzzle mode proved more frustrating than fun for me although I can definitely see how folks fonder of problem-solving type games would love that game mode. With the multiplayer mode, however, there is a map editor so you can create your own scenarios. It actually reminds me a lot of the scenario creator in Age of Empires II from way back in the day.

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The story of the game isn't really the highlight here as it's pretty standard. The main character is the princess of this kingdom called Cherrystone, and then this skeleton army invades, and the whole story from there is pretty much exactly what you'd expect - run away, meet up with allies, counter-attack, discover plot device, save the world, etc, etc. What keeps the story interesting isn't the story itself but rather the characters and how they're developed over the course of the story. I can't say that I loved all of the characters in Wargroove's cast, but I definitely found the vast majority to be quite likable and endearing. Especially Caesar. 15/10 best boy.

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Wargroove doesn't reinvent the wheel when it comes to turn-based strategy gameplay, but it still does the genre extremely well. The units are well balanced to counter one another, the characters in the story mode are likable and well developed, and the visuals are bright, colorful, and well detailed despite the pixel art style. Perhaps the best detail of the game, however, is its approachability. Wargroove's difficulty is fully customizable even beyond the handful of difficulty setting with sliders allowing players to set to their liking the rate of resource income, damage taken, and the speed at which the generals' special abilities charge. This means that the game can be enjoyed by those who've never played a game like this before as well those who've beaten every game the genre has to offer. In a time when most games seem to handle difficulty by making the whole thing mind-numbingly easy or brutally difficult, the extent of customization that Wargroove's difficulty settings provide is a welcome change of pace. Given the game's exclusivity to the Switch, this is a definite must-own for Switch gamers even if it is sadly only available digitally.
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Ack
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by Ack Mon May 06, 2019 2:57 pm

1. Dusk (PC)(FPS)
2. Project: Snowblind (PC)(FPS)
3. Soldier of Fortune: Platinum Edition (PC)(FPS)
4. Ziggurat (PC)(FPS)
5. Wolfenstein 3D: Ultimate Challenge (PC)(FPS)
6. Destiny 2 (PC)(FPS/RPG)
7. Destiny 2: Curse of Osiris (PC)(FPS/RPG)
8. Destiny 2: Warmind (PC)(FPS/RPG)

9. Destiny 2: Forsaken (PC)(FPS/RPG)
10. Star Wars: Rebel Assault (PC)(Rail Shooter)

11. Castle Werewolf (PC)(FPS)
12. Project Warlock (PC)(FPS)
13. Castle Crashers (PC)(Hack and Slash)
14. This Strange Realm of Mine (PC)(FPS)
15. BioShock Remastered (PC)(FPS)
16. BioShock 2 (PC)(FPS)
17. BioShock 2: Minerva's Den (PC)(FPS)


I probably should have posted this earlier, but I've been working my way through the BioShock series for the last few weeks and decided it was time I actually post something about what I have beaten.

BioShock Remastered

I don't really have a lot to say about this. I've played BioShock before, and it didn't impress me much then. Technically, it's a beautiful game; when it came out, the use of water was absolutely phenomenal. The Remastered version does make some visual improvements to help things run with modern visual updates, though a lot of the world now looks considerably more cartoonish. That said, I'm happy to say I still think it's a beautiful world. That's all that was changed for the Remastered edition (well, that and Steam achievements being incorporated), so if you had any other issues with the game the first time, you'll still have them.

Which means I still have them. The gunplay felt lackluster on my initial playthrough, and it still does here, though you can choose instead to focus on melee with great success. Since I'm familiar with the game already, I was able to rush through areas I'd encountered problems with before, but sometimes the game is happy to put a turret in a nasty spot to mess you up, so try to stay on your toes. As for the plot, I've complained about it previously. Yes, I get the showcasing of the failure of absolute Randian philosophy, but the most fascinating part was more about video games and how they control the player's actions, and the game went on to long to completely ruin what would have been a fantastic shock ending for me.

Then I went and played the sequel, and now I see certain things about the original in a much more positive light.

BioShock 2

I go from being just some guy stuck in the show to a full on early series Big Daddy...with nearly none of the benefits. The world is still incredible, because it's the same world. If anything, I have to detract because the ability to backtrack was removed from the second game, and that makes me realize how much I enjoyed it in the first. But basic concepts of the first game were improved upon, such as viewing the progress and benefits of research and how you perform it, a tool with the ability to hack from afar, thus changing my tactics, a dual-wielding of plasmids and weapons, and the upgrade system now featuring a third, special upgrade for each weapon.

Those are the positives. Now for the negatives. First and foremost, the controls between the first and second game change considerably. Some of these choices are understandable, even if I'm not a fan. For example, scrolling through weapons and plasmids had to change to adapt to the new dual-wielding system. But other choices are full on weird. Why is Left Ctrl now being used for health kits? I tend to bind Left Ctrl to crouch, and more than once I wasted a health kit when reacting. The special menu button also changed from H to M for some reason, which was unnecessary. Controller prompts also abound, despite my not using a controller. As someone who prefers his FPS games on a console, I always found this a subtle dig about the influence of consoles on the genre. That, and the colors clash, so it becomes a visual distraction. As someone who played twitch FPS back in the 90s, trust me, you do not want any sort of distraction. Distraction will get you fragged.

The biggest problem though is that you feel weak. I get it, you have to build up in the game, but I'm now a Big Daddy. I should be stomping fools, not nearly getting wasted by one splicer with halfway decent aim. This is countered by the power upgrades you enjoy over time, and by the end of the game you're ridiculously overpowered, but it definitely felt like a harsh awakening going from a game where I had to plan to take these guys on to another where a Joe Schmoe I'd take down with one bullet is now almost effortlessly putting the hurt on me.

As for the plot, I appreciate the juxtaposition this game has with the first. The original BioShock refutes Randian idealism, but BioShock 2 critiques unchecked collectivism and what is very much a socialist approach with an almost religious zeal. We've gone from one side of the spectrum to the other, and not only do both suck, both use similar tactics, such as fostering a cult of personality to an extreme end. The first game was about Andrew Ryan and his Great Chain, but in the sequel, it's Sophia Lamb and her urging to sacrifice yourself for the Family and Utopia. The end result? Both extremes are dehumanizing suckfests, be it individualism above all else or collectivism above all else.

And then we get to...

Minerva's Den

Which is where I fell in love with the story. Minerva's Den is easily my favorite part of BioShock 2. It not only takes all the positives (and admittedly negatives such as controls, though by now I was used to them), but it also adds in large levels that let me explore in a way that feels more natural to me. Sure, there were some restrictions, but I was basically given the keys to the kingdom in each level and told to go have fun, exploring how I like and upgrading myself through my exploration.

The story was also considerably more interesting, because instead of giving me lofty statements on some great ethical debate, I was instead exploring the humanity of a single individual dealing with loss and grief while under a tyrannical regime. It didn't matter which regime, the loss was the true focus. Basically, Minerva's Den is about a person living in a crazy world but experiencing things that are wholly relatable. Give me this one any time.

I believe Minerva's Den is also where the Protector Trials come into play in BioShock 2. The Protector Trials are a series of mini battles where you must protect a little sister gathering Adam from a corpse while splicers try to stop her. The key thing here is that your weapon loadouts are predetermined, so you have to figure out creative ways to use them. Since the enemies you encounter are generally the same, it comes down to understanding how different weapons and plasmid loadouts affect your tactics. I found new uses for tools I hadn't previously used because they weren't my usual playstyle, but now I have a much greater appreciation for them. Conversely, some weapons and plasmids I realize just don't gel. At this point, I've gotten an A or A+ rating in all trials, but it was a fun challenge while it lasted.

All in all, Minerva's Den has been my favorite part of the whole BioShock experience. I still have more to do before I completely wrap up BioShock 2, but that's my achievement hunting habit kicking in. I don't think I'll go into the third BioShock game yet since it's a radical departure from Rapture, but I will get to it some day.
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by MrPopo Mon May 06, 2019 11:34 pm

1. Octopath Traveler - Switch
2. Dusk - PC
3. Forsaken Remastered - PC
4. Tales of Eternia - PS1
5. Resident Evil 2 (2019) - PC
6. Pokémon Trading Card Game - GBC
7. Metro Exodus - PC
8. Thronebreaker: The Witcher Tales - PC
9. Project Warlock - PC
10. Magic: The Gathering - PC
11. Ghost 1.0 - PC
12. Call of Duty 2 - PC
13. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice - PS4
14. Revelations: The Demon Slayer - GBC
15. Mechstermination Force - Switch
16. Shadow Warrior Classic Redux - PC
17. Lost Sphear - Switch
18. Warcraft II: Beyond the Dark Portal - PC

Beyond the Dark Portal is from that era of game expansions designed specifically to start off where the previous game ended with regards to difficulty, maybe with a slightly easier first level or two. You need to be ready to go full tilt in every mission. However, there is one major saving grace; the game switched to using the multiplayer AI instead of the campaign AI. This has two implications. The first is that the map design usually starts enemy bases off with few buildings. The second is that the enemy actually needs to collect resources (and consequently, can be starved of resources). This means you are going to want to approach the missions a little differently from the base game. While in the base game you could usually just set up a defensive line and build up an overwhelming force, in this game you're going to be attacked enough that you can't just roll a tide over. And since most of the missions involve you needing to assault to set up a base you are going to want to take that force and move on to a second enemy base; there's usually two main enemy bases per mission, so taking out the less defended one will drastically improve your situation.

Storywise there was a bit more care placed into the narrative. While the base game's story can assume to have both sides mostly happening with the Humans winning and some massaging of the events this game actually has both campaigns happen (the Orc campaign starts a bit before the Human campaign and finishes before it as well). This does the work of keeping the universe open (whereas Warcraft II just ended the Orc threat) and setting up several plot threads that would be picked up in Warcraft III and WoW.
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Games Beaten: 2015 2016 2017 2018
Blizzard Entertainment Software Developer - All comments and views are my own and not representative of the company.
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by pook99 Wed May 08, 2019 11:09 pm

54. Battle Princess Madeline (switch)
55. Contra (nes)
56. Super Punch out (snes)

54. Battle Princess Madeline

Battle princess Madeline is a game that is heavily influenced by ghosts n goblins but throws in some metroid and RPG elements.

The story is lifted straight out of the princess bride. A young girl is sick and in bed, her grandfather visits her to read her a story to make her feel better. Being the little brat that she is, Madeline, would prefer to play on her phone but grandpa promises to make the story exciting and does so by inserting her and him into the story to peak her interest. Madelines ancestors spirits have all been trapped by an evil monster and it is up to Madeline, and the spirit of Fritz, the family dog, to go on an epic quest to free the spirits of her ancestors.

As soon as you fire up the game the homage to gng is obvious. Maddy moves the same way as arthur, attacks the same, and quickly unlocks a double jump similar to what you would expect from the gng series. Maddy wears armor that gets knocked off when she is hit and she is wearing pajamas instead of underwear, which is great because it would have been really weird controlling an 8 year old in her underwear.

Unlock the gng series you can carry multiple weapons at once and switch between them at will. You can also upgrade your armor and weapons by collecting gold.

The game structure is oddly done, there are 10 levels, but they don't go in a sequential order. The first half of the game is spent exploring the first 5 levels, beating bosses, collecting stuff, and doing little side quests. Each level has a warp stone so you can easily go to any level you have previously unlocked and you can access the stone at any time from the pause menu, making backtracking quick and painless. The levels themselves are fairly large, you get a map to easily navigate these levels, but the map does not show how the world is connected which makes the early portion of the game a bit confusing.

I was not sold on the game at first, I felt like the exploration aspects just added confusion and slowed the pace of the game down, they were not terrible, but they just felt unneccesary. There are also a ton of side quests with lame rewards that make them not worth the time. A big issue I have with these side quests is that they never tell you where to resolve them in the quest log. So for example, you meet a guy in a random town, he asks you to find an item. An hour or 2 later you find this item but have no way of knowing who originally gave you the quest.

Once you beat the first cluster of levels you unlock a new portal that lets you warp to 4 new levels, at this time the game becomes much more streamlined, beat a level, warp to a new one, repeat until all 4 levels are beat, warp to final level. I personally enjoy linear games more than I do exploring so I greatly preferred the second half of the game to the first.

The challenge level is definitely on the easy side. Given its heritage I was expecting a super challenging game, but it is not anywhere near as difficult as the game that inspired it. This is not necessarily a bad thing, as the game is still a lot of fun, but I just went in expecting a much harder game then I got. I also did not really love the bosses. The bosses in this game are huge bullet sponges, but their patterns are fairly simple. What this means is you get hit a few times in the beginning learning the bosses moves and then you just rotely repeat the pattern until the boss dies which takes way longer than it should, once I learned the bosses rather simplistic patterns, I just got bored fighting them.

Battle princess Madeline is a fun but flawed game. If you really want to play a game that is heavily inspred by gng than it may be worth your time but it is not a must play by any means.


@flake: Have you played Mega Man 11 yet? Definitely a must play game for fans of the series. Plague knight is fun, but scythe is much more fun. All 3 games are enjoyable though and each one has enough differences to feel unique.

@ElkinFencer: wargroove looks like a lot of fun, I'll probably pick it up on steam at some point, nice review.
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by Ordinary Gamer Thu May 09, 2019 12:07 am

pook99 wrote:54. Battle Princess Madeline (switch)
55. Contra (nes)
56. Super Punch out (snes)

54. Battle Princess Madeline

Battle princess Madeline is a game that is heavily influenced by ghosts n goblins but throws in some metroid and RPG elements.

The story is lifted straight out of the princess bride. A young girl is sick and in bed, her grandfather visits her to read her a story to make her feel better. Being the little brat that she is, Madeline, would prefer to play on her phone but grandpa promises to make the story exciting and does so by inserting her and him into the story to peak her interest. Madelines ancestors spirits have all been trapped by an evil monster and it is up to Madeline, and the spirit of Fritz, the family dog, to go on an epic quest to free the spirits of her ancestors.

As soon as you fire up the game the homage to gng is obvious. Maddy moves the same way as arthur, attacks the same, and quickly unlocks a double jump similar to what you would expect from the gng series. Maddy wears armor that gets knocked off when she is hit and she is wearing pajamas instead of underwear, which is great because it would have been really weird controlling an 8 year old in her underwear.

Unlock the gng series you can carry multiple weapons at once and switch between them at will. You can also upgrade your armor and weapons by collecting gold.

The game structure is oddly done, there are 10 levels, but they don't go in a sequential order. The first half of the game is spent exploring the first 5 levels, beating bosses, collecting stuff, and doing little side quests. Each level has a warp stone so you can easily go to any level you have previously unlocked and you can access the stone at any time from the pause menu, making backtracking quick and painless. The levels themselves are fairly large, you get a map to easily navigate these levels, but the map does not show how the world is connected which makes the early portion of the game a bit confusing.

I was not sold on the game at first, I felt like the exploration aspects just added confusion and slowed the pace of the game down, they were not terrible, but they just felt unneccesary. There are also a ton of side quests with lame rewards that make them not worth the time. A big issue I have with these side quests is that they never tell you where to resolve them in the quest log. So for example, you meet a guy in a random town, he asks you to find an item. An hour or 2 later you find this item but have no way of knowing who originally gave you the quest.

Once you beat the first cluster of levels you unlock a new portal that lets you warp to 4 new levels, at this time the game becomes much more streamlined, beat a level, warp to a new one, repeat until all 4 levels are beat, warp to final level. I personally enjoy linear games more than I do exploring so I greatly preferred the second half of the game to the first.

The challenge level is definitely on the easy side. Given its heritage I was expecting a super challenging game, but it is not anywhere near as difficult as the game that inspired it. This is not necessarily a bad thing, as the game is still a lot of fun, but I just went in expecting a much harder game then I got. I also did not really love the bosses. The bosses in this game are huge bullet sponges, but their patterns are fairly simple. What this means is you get hit a few times in the beginning learning the bosses moves and then you just rotely repeat the pattern until the boss dies which takes way longer than it should, once I learned the bosses rather simplistic patterns, I just got bored fighting them.

Battle princess Madeline is a fun but flawed game. If you really want to play a game that is heavily inspred by gng than it may be worth your time but it is not a must play by any means.




Everything you wrote seems to describe the game's story mode. I'm a bit curious about arcade mode. Does it save your progress? I'm curious to know whether or not I'll have to do it all in one sitting ala Volgarr the Viking's "Path of the Valkyrie". I've read several reviews from various game sites to find the answer to this question and they've been predictably useless, so that's why I'm asking.
Flake
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by Flake Thu May 09, 2019 9:25 am

January Games:
Megaman (Switch)
Megaman 2 (Switch)
Megaman 3 (Switch)
Megaman 4 (Switch)
Megaman 5 (Switch)
Megaman 6 (Switch)
Megaman 7 (Switch)
Megaman 8 (Switch)
Megaman 9 (Switch)
Megaman 10 (Switch)
Kirby's Dreamland (Wii)
Time Spinner (PS4)

February Games:

Megaman Legends (PSTV)
The Misadventures of Tron Bonne (PSTV)
Donkey Kong Country Returns (Wii)

March Games:

Metroid: Samus Returns (3DS)
Mario Galaxy (Wii)

April

Batman: Arkham Asylum (PS4)

May

Shovel Knight: Shovel of Hope (Switch)
Shovel Knight: Plague of Shadows (Switch)
Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes (PS4)


Shovel Knight: Plague of Shadows is AMAZING. It's a great game, first of all, but as a companion to Shovel of Hope, it reminds me of a kind of game development that flat out doesn't exist anymore. Back in the PS1 era you'd get re-mix games like Metal Gear Solid: VR Missions, Rival Schools Evolution or Armored Core: Project Phantasma. Mostly re-used Assets but with new scenarios, gameplay tweaks, etc - it could bring a game you loved back to life and give you more hours and memories.

That's what Plague of Shadows felt like. I got to revisit all the levels from the main game and encounter the bosses and enemies in a new way. Plague Knight's gameplay turns the game into a kind of combat puzzler as you have to leverage his wacky movement scheme to navigate through platforming challenges that you could tackle much more directly in the main game. And then all the storyline tweaks that make it make sense that you're Plague Knight without the game just pretending Shovel Knight doesn't exist (Looking at you Super Luigi Bros U.)

I also beat Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes again. Nothing to say about it other than it's one of my favorite single level, self-contained games. Also that it is WAY harder than Phantom Pain. Also - that emergency medical situation on the helicopter at the end STILL makes me squeamish.
The PSTV is amazing.
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