Anything that is gaming related that doesn't fit well anywhere else
User avatar
ElkinFencer10
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 7773
Joined: Fri Aug 13, 2010 8:34 pm
Location: Henderson, North Carolina

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by ElkinFencer10 Tue Jul 09, 2019 1:16 pm

Games Beaten in 2019 So Far - 37
* denotes a replay

January (12 Games Beaten)
1. Army Men 3D - PlayStation - January 1*
2. Ys I: Ancient Ys Vanished - NES - January 4
3. Mega Man - NES - January 6
4. Mega Man 2 - NES - January 6
5. Mega Man 3 - NES - January 6
6. Mega Man 4 - NES - January 7
7. Dr. Discord's Conquest - NES - January 7
8. Mega Man 5 - NES - January 26
9. Just Cause 3 - PlayStation 4 - January 26
10. Mega Man 6 - NES - January 27
11. Persona 5: Dancing in Starlight - Vita - January 27
12. Mobile Suit Gundam: Encounters in Space - PlayStation 2 - January 27


February (2 Games Beaten)
13. Earth Defense Force 5 - PlayStation 4 - February 2
14. Fallout 76 - PlayStation 4 - February 3


March (4 Games Beaten)
15. Octopath Traveler - Switch - March 2
16. Resident Evil 0 - PlayStation 4 - March 9
17. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered - PlayStation 4 - March 10
18. Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade - Game Boy Advance - March 30


April (3 Games Beaten)
19. Moemon - Game Boy Advance - April 5
20. Yoshi's Crafted World - Switch - April 10
21. Wargroove - Switch - April 26


May (8 Games Beaten)
22. Dragon's Dogma: Dark Arisen - Switch - May 5
23. Battlefield V - PlayStation 4 - May 9
24. Timespinner - PlayStation 4 - May 12
25. Earth Defense Force: Iron Rain - PlayStation 4 - May 17
26. Shenmue - PlayStation 4 - May 19
27. Xenosaga Episode I: Der Wille zur Macht - PlayStation 2 - May 26
28. Team Sonic Racing - Switch - May 29
29. Xenosaga Episode II: Jenseits von Gut und Böse - PlayStation 2 - May 30


June (5 Games Beaten)
30. Xenosaga Episode III: Also Sprache Zarathustra - PlayStation 2 - June 2
31. Gato Roboto - Switch - June 3
32. Katana Zero - Switch - June 4
33. The Walking Dead: Survival Instinct - Wii U - June 8
34. Dark Savior - Saturn - June 12


July (3 Games Beaten)
35. The Elder Scrolls V: Skryim - Switch - June 7
36. The Elder Scrolls V: Skryim: Dragonborn - Switch - June 7
37. The Elder Scrolls V: Skryim: Dawnguard - Switch - June 7


35. The Elder Scrolls V: Skryim - Switch - June 7
36. The Elder Scrolls V: Skryim: Dragonborn - Switch - June 7
37. The Elder Scrolls V: Skryim: Dawnguard - Switch - June 7

Image

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim is one of those games that even people who never play games have heard of. It took the gaming scene by storm when it released, and it's one of the most famous and well received games of the past two decades and for good reason. Many of us probably own multiple copies of the game; I personally own it on every system except Xbox One though I'm still not entirely clear how I reached that point in my sad, depressing little life...But regardless, Skyrim is a veritable juggernaut in the open world RPG arena even eight years after its original release.

Image

I've played through Skyrim before, but this was my first time playing through the various side quest lines as well as my first time playing through the three DLC packs - Dawnguard, Hearthfire, and Dragonborn. I had it on PS4 before I got it on Switch, but I just never felt like devoting the time to it there. Getting it on Switch, though, added the factor of portability. Suddenly I could play Skyrim during my lunch breaks at work, while selling tickets at school soccer games, or while lying in bed at night. For such a seemingly minor factor, that portability really helped engross me in the game. I was blown away by having such a massive and deep fantasy world to explore right in the palm of my hands with no compromises or cuts made. In terms of official content, it's 100% identical to its PS4 and XB1 counterparts. All the Switch version lacks is the community mods which, while cool, I don't really care too much about on console anyway.

Image

As most are familiar with Skyrim, I won't spend much time on the story, but the short short short version is that ancient dragons have suddenly returned to enslave the world, and your character awakens to his or her (in my case, an Imperial woman named Ke$ha) gift as the Dragonborn, one born with the blood and soul of a dragon and able to slay dragons and absorb their souls. You then set off on a quest to save the world of the dragon king Alduin and learn the ways of the Thu'um, the ancient dragon language of power. In the Dragonborn DLC, you investigate a nearby island that's not actually in Skyrim but in northwestern Morrowind and why people are falling under a mysterious spell and being forced to labor at building cryptic monuments of some kind. In Dawnguard, you assume the role of vampire hunter to stop an ancient prophecy from coming to fruition and turning the world into a vampires' playground. In Hearthfire...you don't actually do much questing. All that DLC pack really added was the ability to buy land, build a house, and adopt children who pester you endlessly for money, toys, and to play with them. Cool to build a mansion, yes, but not really a deep and compelling bit of added content.

Image

What most people are probably most curious about are the visuals. How does the Switch port stand up graphically considering that, at the end of the day, the Switch is really just a gaming tablet. Truthfully, it holds up much better than I expected. While it doesn't look as good as its PS4 or Xbox One counterparts, obviously, it does use the "Special Edition" assets from those versions albeit at a lower resolution, so it's a significant graphical improvement over the original PS3 and Xbox 360 releases. As for PC, that's a mixed bag with the wide array of graphical options and computer builds, but in general, I'd say it offers a slight improvement over the original PC release while obviously falling far short of the Special Edition PC version (as do the PS4 and XB1 versions as well). Again, though, considering the hardware it's on and its portability, the game looks remarkable. What you don't get on any of those versions, however, is the Master Sword, Hylian Shield, and Hero's Tunic. BEWARE THOUGH - only one Master Sword can exist in the game, and it's tied to your level at acquisition, so if you're an idiot like me and get the Master Sword at level 3 from an amiibo, it's pretty much useless throughout 90% of the game, but if you wait until you're like level 50, you'll have a beefy ass sword there. Same principle with the Hylian Shield and the tunic although I *think* those can be reacquired through rare amiibo drops. Being a Bethesda game, it obviously has a variety of interesting bugs and glitches, but considering that I only experienced five or six crashes during my roughly 150 hours with the game, I'd say it's pretty damn stable for a Bethesda release.

Image

Given the portable nature of the Switch, one aspect of the game that warrants discussion here that isn't usually a consideration with other consoles is power use. Nintendo's official line is that the Switch boasts a battery life of between 2.5 and 6 hours depending on the demands of the game being played and other settings used (brightness, wifi, etc). I played with my brightness set somewhere between 10% and 15% and wifi on, and I got between two and two and a half hours out of it before needing to recharge. Granted, I didn't play from 100% to straight 0% dead, but I ran it until about 5% battery. With that said, I definitely wouldn't recommend having handheld mode as THE way to play Skyrim unless you have a beefy external power pack to use, but the battery is robust enough to allow handheld gameplay to supplement the docked experience with no issues. Given that this is a pretty taxing game on the Switch's hardware, though, it runs pretty hot after a while, so if you're worried about physically warping the system from overheating, that's something to consider. For what it's worth, though, it looks fantastic handheld with the small HD screen, and the fact that you can play something like this while you're pooping in a public restroom is like friggin' sci-fi stuff, man.

Image

I don't think I need to tell anyone that Skyrim is one of the greatest open world games of all time, but in case I do, here it is plain as day - Skyrim is one of the greatest open world games of all time. Even next to open world fantasy games that I absolutely ADORE like Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild and The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt, no open world fantasy game has ever engrossed me and kept me saying "one more quest" or "one more dungeon" the way that The Elder Scrolls V did. It doesn't matter if this is your first time playing it or your 10th time playing it, Skyrim holds a once-in-a-generation adventure that every gamer owes it to himself or herself to experience at least once, and with the newer releases including all of the DLC for the game, there's never been a better time to explore Tamriel's frozen north. The Switch version holds up far better than I expected both graphically and in terms of performance, and having the ability to play the game on the go takes it to a whole new level. It may be almost a decade old by this point, but Skyrim remains a must-play for any gamer.
Last edited by ElkinFencer10 on Wed Jul 10, 2019 10:40 am, edited 1 time in total.
Exhuminator wrote:Ecchi lords must unite for great justice.

Image
User avatar
noiseredux
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 38152
Joined: Fri Nov 14, 2008 1:09 pm

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by noiseredux Tue Jul 09, 2019 1:19 pm

great write-up and I totally agree. Skyrim is probably one of my favorite games EVER period. One of those games I tend to play annually now. Coincidentally, my last playthrough was also the Switch port which I loved.
Image
User avatar
BoneSnapDeez
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 19778
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 1:08 pm
Location: Maine

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by BoneSnapDeez Tue Jul 09, 2019 9:10 pm

1. Ys III: Wanderers from Ys (Famicom)
2. Dragon Scroll: Yomigaerishi Maryuu (Famicom)
3. Ninja-kun: Majou no Bouken (Famicom)
4. Hello Kitty World (Famicom)
5. Galaxian (Famicom)
6. Esper Dream 2: Aratanaru Tatakai (Famicom)
7. Ninja Jajamaru-kun (Famicom)
8. Jajamaru no Daibouken (Famicom)
9. Front Line (Famicom)
10. Field Combat (Famicom)
11. Portopia Renzoku Satsujin Jiken (Famicom)
12. Mississippi Satsujin Jiken: Murder on the Mississippi (Famicom)
13. Space Harrier (Famicom)
14. Geimos (Famicom)
15. Attack Animal Gakuen (Famicom)
16. Sky Destroyer (Famicom)
17. Ripple Island (Famicom)
18. Oishinbo: Kyukyoku no Menu 3bon Syoubu (Famicom)
19. Bird Week (Famicom)
20. Baltron (Famicom)
21. Yie Ar Kung-Fu (Famicom)
22. Challenger (Famicom)
23. Ikki (Famicom)
24. Dough Boy (Famicom)
25. Atlantis no Nazo (Famicom)
26. Bio Senshi Dan: Increaser tono Tatakai (Famicom)
27. Yume Penguin Monogatari (Famicom)
28. King Kong 2: Ikari no Megaton Punch (Famicom)
29. Congo Bongo (Atari 2600)
30. Coconuts (Atari 2600)
31. Arcade Archives: Donkey Kong (Switch eShop)
32. Dragon Quest V: Tenkuu no Hanayome (Super Famicom)
33. Johnny Turbo's Arcade: Super Burger Time (Switch eShop)
34. Fire Fly (Atari 2600)
35. Fire Fighter (Atari 2600)
36. Space Jockey (Atari 2600)
37. Airlock (Atari 2600)
38. Makai Hakkenden Shada (PC Engine)
39. Squeeze Box (Atari 2600)
40. Lagoon (SNES)
41. Atlantis (Atari 2600)
42. Xak III: The Eternal Recurrence (PC Engine CD)
43. Blue Blink (PC Engine)
44. Ys IV: The Dawn of Ys (PC Engine CD)

45. Cally's Caves 3 (Steam)
Image
Cally's Caves 3 is one of those "modern retro" experiences that is clearly influenced by a heaping of classic titles, but ultimately feels quite different from anything and everything released during that bygone era. This is a type of vaguely non-linear platforming run and gun, taking clear inspiration from Contra, Metroid, Mega Man, and a host of others, complete with a "level up everything!" XP hoarding gimmick. It sounds like a bit of a mess, and it kind of is. What it also is: a good game.

Though the third title in the series (no kidding), Cally's Caves 3 is the first to migrate from the land of mobile games (2015) to the Steam store (2016). A remake of the second game (retitled Cally's Trials) soon followed, while the fourth game saw its mobile and Steam releases appear within a small (two month) windows. As for the first Cally's Caves... It was a mobile exclusive that has since disappeared into the ether. The developer, the Canadian VDO games, doesn't even acknowledge its (former) existence on their website. Steam is the preferred environment for the Cally's series by the way. It's worth forking over the cash to avoid the ads and touch screen controls.

Who is Cally? She's an adorable blonde kindergartener whose parents have been kidnapped by a mad scientist (all these games seem to share the same plot). To find them she must work her way through a series of 110(-ish) cave stages; the game has a wholly "interior" setting much like Symphony of the Night and Ys Origin. Cally's Caves 3 is comprised of several "worlds" which are then broken down into bite-sized individual stages, shopping stop-offs, and concluding boss arenas. Checkpoints appear every few stages, and Cally has the ability to warp back to any that have been visited. There's a very useful map, one that allows the player to "scan" stage environments, but the game is ultimately quite linear. While exploration of "branching paths" is encouraged (required, really) there's very little incentive to ever truly backtrack. While newly-obtained abilities may allow Cally to access a chest or two she missed earlier, most simply contain money and/or health refills, which can also be found just about everywhere else.
Image
Controls are fluid, for the most part. Cally's got some jumping skills, with the default double-jump later becoming upgraded to a triple. While it's fun to bound through stages, the amount of time Cally's allotted to remain airborne almost feels excessive. Like an early Kirby title, it's often possible to simply "fly" over difficult segments. There's a roll maneuver (unnecessarily mapped to two different buttons) but it's severely underutilized. Not useful for dodging enemy attacks, it exists for the sole purpose of accessing small crevices. Combat is pretty unique. Cally's endowed with a series of projectile weapons, found throughout her journey, most of which are guns. While the earliest couple of guns quickly become obsolete, most weapons retain their inherent character and functionality. There are bombs, for instance, that can drop down to harm enemies below Cally's reach, a laser gun that can penetrate walls, a spike gun that creates platforms, a boomerang that smashes fiends in both directions, and much more. Thus, the player is encouraged to experiment with, and empower, all sorts of weaponry, as opposed to power-leveling a single gun at the expense of all others.

"Gun experience" is granted as Cally pummels enemies, with weapons quickly evolving into bigger, better variants. It's quite a thrill to see a tiny pea shooter eventually fulfill its destiny by transforming into a giant rocket launcher, but there is a downside to all this gunplay. The diverse array of weapons, coupled with the experience system, means that damage inflicted to enemies is rather variable. And, at lower levels, enemies seemingly take a million hits to vanquish. Hell, even in the later stages slaying a single foe is a time investment. Bosses are even worse in this regard. They're typically just larger and slightly more complex versions of the standard enemies, with mile-long health bars.
Image
In addition to the projectile weapons, Cally is blessed with a powerful short-range sword, mapped to its own button. What it lacks in reach it makes up for in power. It's arguably the most broken weapon in the game, as it possesses the ability to stun-lock enemies until their eventual demise. The sword is the only weapon not effected by experience points, instead it must be powered up via purchased upgrades. Coins of various denominations are founds scattered throughout the caves, as well as "orbs" that increase Cally's own XP bar, eventually resulting in a permanent upgrade in hit points.

The occasional shops are, strangely enough, run by the son of the mad scientist villain. A plethora of items are available, including coin multipliers and weapon enhancements. Said weapon enhancements can poison or freeze enemies, but are prohibitively expensive, and unnecessary. There are food-based HP refills too, of course. Cally can hold six of them, which arguably negates any challenge found in boss fights, as Cally can conceivably refill her health to its maximum six times! The game is on the easy side anyway, generally speaking. Death comes rarely, and when it does Cally is sent back to the last checkpoint reached with a small amount of money lost. This money can usually be regained within a matter of thirty seconds or so. Enemy AI is also utterly and completely brainless, with the vast majority of fiends simply walking back and forth on whatever horizontal platform they occupy.
Image
The aesthetic presentation of Cally's Caves 3 is of mixed quality, though mostly intriguing. Stage backgrounds admittedly dull in that "this is obviously a port of a mobile game" kind of way, though the developers did a decent job of differentiating the various cave environments. It's just that none look particularly interesting. I do love the Cally sprite. She's bouncy, adorable, and it's hilarious to witness her wield the oversized guns. You even get to see the shell casing bounce away as she fires. Brilliant. Sadly, the enemy sprites are complete garbage. They're ugly copy-paste stock designs: just random spiders, bees, wolves, and "thugs." Terrible. The music, I'm pleased to say, is incredible. The developers made no attempts to emulate the chiptunes of old, opting instead for some thumping techno tunes. Everything here is meticulously composed and undeniably catchy. Even more captivating is how the soundtrack was integrated into the game. For the most part, individual tunes aren't assigned to specific areas. Instead, the soundtrack shuffles and loops in the background (this means a different "title screen theme" every time the game is booted!). It aids in creating a sort of hypnotic effect; this is an easy game to "lose oneself" in.

Performance-wise, system requirements for Cally's Caves 3 are quite low ("This game should play on pretty much anything!" notes the developer). The game didn't recognize my controller, and Steam screenshots never seemed to work, so I had to play with two additional programs running in the background to mitigate these issues. This may have more to do with my computer than any inherent game programming, of course. The in-game UI is rather weak, obvious designed for touch controls, but far from game-breaking.

Verdict: there's a lot going on here, and I suspect Cally's Caves 3 may have functioned better had the "RPG elements" been dumped in favor of a more straightforward action-platformer type of game design. Nevertheless, this is ultimately a worthwhile experience, and retro 2D fanatics could certainly do a lot worse. Almost forgot to mention: there are a few stages were you play as a bear instead of Cally. I don't get it either.
User avatar
Xeogred
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 14385
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 7:49 pm
Location: KC

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by Xeogred Tue Jul 09, 2019 10:12 pm

1. Castlevania: Order of Ecclesia* (DS)
2. Shadow of the Colossus (PS4)
3. Onimusha: Warlords* (PS4)
4. Resident Evil 2* (PSX)[Leon A]
5. Resident Evil 2 Remake (PS4)[Platinum]
6. Donkey Kong Country: Tropical Freeze* (Switch)
7. Devil May Cry 5 (PS4)
8. Mass Effect* (PS3)
9. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice (PS4)
10. Mass Effect 2* (PS3)
11. Streets of Rage 2 (SMS)
12. Mortal Kombat (Genesis)
13. Mass Effect 3* (PS3)
Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice (PS4)[Platinum]
14. Front Mission (DS)
15. Doom: Sigil (PC)
Front Mission (DS)[UCS Scenario]
16. Doom 2: TNT Revilution (PC)[8h32m55][UV]
17. R-Type Leo (Arcade)
18. Super R-Type* (SNES)
19. Doom 2: TNT Evilution* (PC)[5h55m56][UV/Complex]
20. R-Type III (SNES)[SaveStates]
21. Life Force (NES)
22. Metal Storm (NES)
23. Near Death (PC)
24. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night (PC)
25. Adventures of Lolo (NES)
26. Dying Light (PC)

22 hours (in game), Steam says 26 overall.

Image

Mirror's Edge parkour + zombies (+ RE styled cool evolved types) + Fallout = fun.

Dying Light is something I've been a little curious about for a few years now and it always looked cool from a glance. More recently, the showcasing of the upcoming sequel boosted my interest even more with former Obsidian lead writer Chris Avellone onboard and them going really hard on an emphasis for a Fallout (New Vegas) styled faction system with severe consequences per player choices, yeah I absolutely want that. So I grabbed the first game recently when the complete edition was on sale and 20 some hours later, this was some intuition that paid off very nicely.

For the most part, this game reminds me of modern Far Cry but it's got more balls and is superior in most departments, writing/characters, difficulty, level design, parkour fun, etc. I could definitely see the Fallout-isms already upfront in this first game too with how some of the character interactions were and whatnot, so the roots have already been planted. This game drops the player in a nice big sandbox for exploring and taking out zombies. I liked pretending this world was from We're Alive, some audio drama I listened to a few years ago. There is loot and crafting but it's never overbearing like some open world / RPG games thesedays. Early on it definitely plays more like a serious survival horror game and the learning curve was kind of steep actually but I really appreciated that and liked having to relearn a new FPS in ways. It takes hours to even get guns. And there's more than just zombies, you'll be taking on human enemies and whatnot eventually too as the story twists and turns. There is also no fast travel, outside of teleporting from one main city zone to another in the back half. YOU, the player are the fast travel. You are constantly gaining exp while traversing rooftops and climbing buildings, unlocking more abilities along the way like jumping off zombie heads. It's fun just simply running around in this game. The night is terrifying as well with special enemy types that come out then and annihilate you early game, even towards the end they're impossible to take on in groups. I was really impressed by the interior levels too, some good sewers, urban buildings and labs, some quarantine zones that are like mini-dungeons basically, etc.

Overall Dying Light felt like a lesson of "less is more". It's got a Skyrim styled level up system with three skill trees and one I didn't even unlock. There is loot, crafting, side missions and miscellaneous stuff sprinkled throughout the map, but it never felt really overbearing to me and I've been pretty burned out on open world games thesedays. Dying Light trims down the fat in the best ways possible and it just gets right to the point. I did get 100% story completion, but there's tons to do and this thing seems to actively have thousands of players on at a given time, so the repeatable quests and such must keep people coming back. You can play everything in co-cop too outside the final mission too apparently. I bet that could be fun but I played the entire game solo with no issue.

+ Epic parkour movement and melee combat
+ You get a GRAPPLE HOOK midway in too, which makes movement even more fun than before
+ Confident story/characters in a mostly over saturated genre
+ Tough difficulty, rock solid sense of progression in every sense from player to enemies and new ideas thrown in later on
+ 80's tint to the OST
+ Drop kick ability and kicking people off rooftops never got old

- Some boss battles were a little annoying and the final boss is a seriously lame QTE battle, which was super tough for me on keyboard
- Menu navigation and menu controls are a bit awkward and it seems like it would be odd for a gamepad too
- Lots of looting early on might get tiresome (but it pays off midway in)
- Steep learning curve early on might prevent some from sticking with it, but I'm glad I did
- Too much lockpicking after awhile, at least it's easy though (same system as the Bethesda stuff)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rex95kd_Yxw
User avatar
ElkinFencer10
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 7773
Joined: Fri Aug 13, 2010 8:34 pm
Location: Henderson, North Carolina

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by ElkinFencer10 Wed Jul 10, 2019 10:39 am

Games Beaten in 2019 So Far - 39
* denotes a replay

January (12 Games Beaten)
1. Army Men 3D - PlayStation - January 1*
2. Ys I: Ancient Ys Vanished - NES - January 4
3. Mega Man - NES - January 6
4. Mega Man 2 - NES - January 6
5. Mega Man 3 - NES - January 6
6. Mega Man 4 - NES - January 7
7. Dr. Discord's Conquest - NES - January 7
8. Mega Man 5 - NES - January 26
9. Just Cause 3 - PlayStation 4 - January 26
10. Mega Man 6 - NES - January 27
11. Persona 5: Dancing in Starlight - Vita - January 27
12. Mobile Suit Gundam: Encounters in Space - PlayStation 2 - January 27


February (2 Games Beaten)
13. Earth Defense Force 5 - PlayStation 4 - February 2
14. Fallout 76 - PlayStation 4 - February 3


March (4 Games Beaten)
15. Octopath Traveler - Switch - March 2
16. Resident Evil 0 - PlayStation 4 - March 9
17. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered - PlayStation 4 - March 10
18. Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade - Game Boy Advance - March 30


April (3 Games Beaten)
19. Moemon - Game Boy Advance - April 5
20. Yoshi's Crafted World - Switch - April 10
21. Wargroove - Switch - April 26


May (8 Games Beaten)
22. Dragon's Dogma: Dark Arisen - Switch - May 5
23. Battlefield V - PlayStation 4 - May 9
24. Timespinner - PlayStation 4 - May 12
25. Earth Defense Force: Iron Rain - PlayStation 4 - May 17
26. Shenmue - PlayStation 4 - May 19
27. Xenosaga Episode I: Der Wille zur Macht - PlayStation 2 - May 26
28. Team Sonic Racing - Switch - May 29
29. Xenosaga Episode II: Jenseits von Gut und Böse - PlayStation 2 - May 30


June (5 Games Beaten)
30. Xenosaga Episode III: Also Sprache Zarathustra - PlayStation 2 - June 2
31. Gato Roboto - Switch - June 3
32. Katana Zero - Switch - June 4
33. The Walking Dead: Survival Instinct - Wii U - June 8
34. Dark Savior - Saturn - June 12


July (5 Games Beaten)
35. The Elder Scrolls V: Skryim - Switch - June 7
36. The Elder Scrolls V: Skryim: Dragonborn - Switch - June 7
37. The Elder Scrolls V: Skryim: Dawnguard - Switch - June 7
38. Tiny Troopers - Switch - July 8
39. Tiny Troopers 2: Special Ops - Switch - July 8


38. Tiny Troopers - Switch - July 8
39. Tiny Troopers 2: Special Ops - Switch - July 8

Image

When I first heard about Tiny Troopers coming to Switch, my immediate reaction was "Oh, another mobile game getting ported to Switch. Whatever." I totally slept on it. I then heard from Joshua French on Twitter that the North American physical Switch release was only going to be sold at Walmart and was limited to about 5000 copies. What's more is that it was retailing for $20. A Switch game for myself for $20 and a rare one to boot? Sure, I'll bite. So I went to a couple different Walmarts until I found one with a few in stock and picked up one. I figured it was going to be a stupid, crappy mobile game and that I'd probably try it once before putting it down and never picking it up again. I was quite mistaken.

Image

If you've ever played Team17's Alien Breed, it plays a lot like that. You control between one and three soldiers in an overhead twin stick shooter. Each mission has a primary objective that much be completed, and most have a secondary objective that you can complete for some extra credits to upgrade your troopers between missions. The troopers on your team are randomly generated in both name and appearance, but there is some advantage to keeping them alive; they rank up and gain more hit points as they survive through mission after mission. The story is nonsensical; you're part of some country fighting some other country, and you're sent to kill bad guys and blow stuff up. Don't kill civilians, but if you do, it's okay because the only penalty is a very mild credit loss. That's pretty much it. There are three campaigns - the original Tiny Troopers campaign, the Spec Ops campaign from Tiny Troopers 2, and a very short zombie campaign. It's not fancy, the story is barebones as hell, and it's not complex, but it's a fun game.

Image

Despite being a fairly good console conversion, the game's roots as a mobile game are still very apparent. Every mission feels very similar even with objectives that can range from kill everything to destroy everything to save prisoners. You walk around, you shoot bad guys, you blow up buildings and vehicles, you search for dog tags and medals, and then you go to the extraction point. There are variations from mission to mission, and it never gets so stale that it begins to bore, but every mission more or less follows that basic format. The visuals also show its mobile phone roots - they look fine, but they don't look great. This isn't a beautiful game like Xenoblade Chronicles 2 or a technical marvel of a game like Wolfenstein II. Then again, it's a budget game you could buy three times over for the price of either one of those two. The character models are what really show the game's roots - it's pretty clear that no major changes to models were made to accommodate console play on a large television. That's okay, though; the game may not look especially pretty, but it's fun, and that's really all that matters.

Image

There's really not a whole lot to say about Tiny Troopers: Joint Ops XL. It's a simple game, but it's fun. It doesn't look especially great, but it runs well. It's good entertainment for 10 or 12 hours, and it's cheap, so I'm content with it. No one will remember it ten years down the line, but if you can find a copy at Walmart or see it on the eShop (especially if it's on sale), then I definitely recommend giving it a go. It's a fun little game, and it would probably be a really good choice for kids old enough to need some a little more than Babby's Furst Gaem but too young for something like Doom or Wolfenstein.
Exhuminator wrote:Ecchi lords must unite for great justice.

Image
pook99
128-bit
 
Posts: 771
Joined: Thu Aug 10, 2017 11:27 pm

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by pook99 Wed Jul 10, 2019 11:51 am

@ELKIN: I enjoyed the first tiny troopers on steam a while back, I didnt even know there was a sequel, I will definitely check it out.

@xeograd: I played dying light at its release and hated it, I don't know why, I just did, but since then it has been hyped through the roof. It is one of those games I want to go back to at some point and give another shot to, sometimes I irrationally don't like a game and then try it again and just love it, I hated god of war for ps4 at first and it is now probably my 2nd favorite ps4 game, I hated Max Payne 3 at first and then fell in love with it a few years later, and I hated RE6 at first which was a popular opinion but it is now one of my favorite action zombie games. I think dying light has the potential to fall into that category.

@Bone: the callys games are a lot of fun, since you enjoyed 3 you should definitely check out 4 at some point, it goes on sale frequently for like 2 or 3 dollars and it is more of the same, I wouldnt play it right now since you probably will get burned out on it but in a few months it may be worth a look. Also, I always thought that animal you played as was a dog but in retrospect a bear makes a little more sense.

@noise: For me CV 4 will always be king but I actually get why someone might prefer x. X has cleaner graphics, a better soundtrack(not a knock on cv 4, IMO X has the best soundtrack of any cv game), and is a far more challenging game. As much as I love 4 it is definitely a departure for the series which is known for its difficulty. For me the linear castlevania hirarchy is:

4 > 3 > bloodstained curse of the moon (yes Im counting it as a CV game) > X = Rondo > chronicles = 1 > legends rebirth > bloodlines (note that even though bloodlines is my least favorite it is still a great game in the grand scheme of things)
User avatar
noiseredux
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 38152
Joined: Fri Nov 14, 2008 1:09 pm

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by noiseredux Wed Jul 10, 2019 12:20 pm

I wrote about how much I disliked playing through 4 recently, but haven't migrated it to my new blog yet so I'll repost:

Can I just say that I hate that the title of this game is "Super" Castlevania IV? It's dumb. There was no Super Castlevania 1-3. There was just Castlevania 1-3. Why add "Super"? Is it because it was meant as a sort of remake? Then why not just call it Super Castlevania? The IV makes it clearly the fourth game in a series. Make up your mind, Konami! Plus, I hate that alphabetically, this one wouldn't sit on a shelf next to the others in the series. It's dumb.

Actually, I'm carrying on. But I think in Japan there was no "IV" in the title. I think it was marketed as a remake. But really... it's not that. It's not, guys. Considering that the castle doesn't even show up until the third act, this is definitely a whole new game. And... I'm kind of mixed on it.

I've been a fan of the Castlevania series since the first title on NES. Although I've never considered myself to be especially good at the games, I still consider Castlevania to be within my short list of favorite franchises. Though I'm pretty sure that Castlevania: Chronicles is the only game in the series I've managed to actually beat, I still love these games and have poured plenty of time into the majority of titles released over the years.

I never did play Castlevania IV until just now though. Note, I'm dropping the "Super" from the title for the rest of this piece to give it parity with the rest of the series. Though I played the hell out of the original NES trilogy back in the day, along with Castlevania: The Adventure on Game Boy, I never managed to find a copy of Castlevania IV on SNES. But lately I've been going through this thing where I've been playing some old classics (and not-so-classics) that I've been meaning to play or replay. So with the help of the Wii U's Virtual Console I finally got into Castlevania IV.

I must declare my defense of the humble Wii U by the way. It's failure was partially my fault. While I did consider it a truly interesting and unique console during its brief lifetime, I never did pick one up back then. We came close one time. We were ready to grab one from Target and then... we just didn't. But I'm learning it was a great dry run for the Switch. And its Virtual Console alone has proven a perfect reason to own one now while you can still find them cheap.

As for Castlevania IV, let me start with a strong positive. This game has a fantastic soundtrack. And I say that as a fan of the series who has taken the time to explore the soundtracks released through the history of the series. Yes, this a series known for phenomenal music and this one in particular is a great mix of old NES-inspired tunes with some excellent atmospheric work. It really sets the mood.

But Simon... poor Simon doesn't quite move the way I want him to. As friends pointed out to me, Castlevania IV is unique enough that the original NES trilogy doesn't prepare you for it. You can't really play it the same way because the mechanics are just different. It took me a while to get used to flinging myself around via the whip. And I never did get used to the thing where you hold down the button to kind of flail your whip in a limp way around you. I don't know. So much felt weird to me.

A bigger problem is the difficulty. Now, it's sort of well "known" that this is one of the easier Castlevania games out there. Just not to ME. Nope. I really really struggled with this one. And it frustrated me. With other, harder games I at least felt like I was learning as I went. With this one I found myself cussing at the enemy placement. So many times I'd land a jump only to have some asshole pop out of nowhere and bump me backwards into a pit of spikes or whatever. It just seems unfair. Or like it revolves around rote memorization which I'm not into.

Thank goodness for Virtual Console save states which I abused the F out of. Clock tower? Save states. A race up disappearing stairs with a blade chasing me? Save states. Oh wait - another note about the difficulty... after I'd go through a stage infuriated at stupid deaths, the bosses would be a joke. Just stand there and whip rapidly and a winner is you.

Anyway, I spent three long nights playing this game. Sometimes I had a lot of fun. Other times I had no fun. Mostly I had fun. And even when I was mad, I felt a lot of reward for perseverance. But when I finally made it to the end of the game and into the boss rush I just felt all motivation leave my body. I beat the first two bosses easily enough but the Grim Reaper just made me rage quit. I tried a half-dozen times or so and decided it was best to walk away without the Victory, but still having positive things to say about the game.

See, Castlevania is like pizza. Even bad pizza is good. Same thing. I had a good time, I got frustrated, and I felt pride. But it's still toward the bottom tier of the Castlevania games I've played. I'd place most of them above this. Which doesn't mean it's a bad game, but rather that this is a vast and great series. Maybe someday I'll come back to this save state and try to finish it off. I just don't have it in me tonight.


Oh, and yeah I consider Bloodstained to be new CV games in everything but name. :)
Image
User avatar
marurun
Moderator
 
Posts: 10399
Joined: Sat May 06, 2006 8:51 am
Location: Cleveland, OH

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by marurun Wed Jul 10, 2019 12:53 pm

Thing is, Bloodstained: Curse of the Moon wants you to think it's a Classicvania title, but it's really not. It doesn't play like those older titles. It's a little more finicky and unforgiving in ways. I guess that's not to say it couldn't be a Classicvania through a modern lens, but I consider it much more an inspired-by than a true inheritor. Because Classicvania generally hooks me, and Curse of the Moon did not. I bounced off of the game like a brick off a monster truck tire.
B/S/T thread
My Classic Games Collection
My Steam Profile
The PC Engine Software Bible Forum, with Shoutbox chat - the new Internet home for PC Engine fandom.
User avatar
noiseredux
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 38152
Joined: Fri Nov 14, 2008 1:09 pm

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by noiseredux Wed Jul 10, 2019 1:05 pm

marurun wrote:Thing is, Bloodstained: Curse of the Moon wants you to think it's a Classicvania title, but it's really not. It doesn't play like those older titles. It's a little more finicky and unforgiving in ways. I guess that's not to say it couldn't be a Classicvania through a modern lens, but I consider it much more an inspired-by than a true inheritor. Because Classicvania generally hooks me, and Curse of the Moon did not. I bounced off of the game like a brick off a monster truck tire.


weird, dude. Curse Of The Moon felt like such an awesome progression of Castlevania III to me. I loved that game hard.
Image
User avatar
ElkinFencer10
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 7773
Joined: Fri Aug 13, 2010 8:34 pm
Location: Henderson, North Carolina

Re: Games Beaten 2019

by ElkinFencer10 Wed Jul 10, 2019 2:23 pm

pook99 wrote:@ELKIN: I enjoyed the first tiny troopers on steam a while back, I didnt even know there was a sequel, I will definitely check it out.

Yeah, they put the two games together for the Switch release (which makes sense for a console release), and while I don't know if it carries anything over on Steam or on mobile, but in the Switch version, your upgrades and character rank advances carry over to the Spec Ops campaign (and the zombie campaign as well).
Exhuminator wrote:Ecchi lords must unite for great justice.

Image
Return to General Gaming

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests