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prfsnl_gmr
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by prfsnl_gmr Mon Mar 19, 2018 8:52 pm

ElkinFencer10 wrote:
prfsnl_gmr wrote:
ElkinFencer10 wrote:38. Bit.Trip Beat - Wii - March 18


Super cool game. Beat the hell out of me though; so, nice work getting through it. I love Commander Video - my wife made me a Commander Video coffee mug a few years ago - and I really should revisit it. If only I could play it with an Atari paddle controller...

Dude, I kept thinking that exact same thing about the paddle. I got through the first level no problem, and while it was tough, I got through the second level on my first try, but the endboss in the last level took me a few tries.


Have you played the Bit.Trip Runner games? Those are what made me fall in love with the series. They are so, so good.
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by pook99 Mon Mar 19, 2018 10:02 pm

ElkinFencer10 wrote:

Have you played the Bit.Trip Runner games? Those are what made me fall in love with the series. They are so, so good.


The bit.trip runner games put all runner games to shame, they are absolutely amazing and completely addicting. I am so stoked for runner 3 on switch. I never played any other game in the bit.trip series, but your review makes me interested in investigating them.
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by ElkinFencer10 Tue Mar 20, 2018 7:44 am

Runner 2 was the first one I played, and that's what got me hooked on the series.

Games Beaten in 2018 So Far - 39
* denotes a replay

January (16 Games Beaten)
1. Phantasy Star Portable - PlayStation Portable - January 1
2. Middle-Earth: Shadow of War - Xbox One - January 9
3. Duck Tales - NES - January 10
4. Yakuza Kiwami - PlayStation 4 - January 14
5. Xuan-Yuan Sword: The Gate of Firmament - PlayStation 4 - January 20
6. Doki Doki Literature Club - Steam - January 20
7. Deep Space Waifu - Steam - January 21
8. Turok: Dinosaur Hunter - Steam - January 21
9. Duck Tales 2 - NES - January 22
10. TaleSpin - NES - January 22
11. Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers - NES - January 23
12. Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers 2 - NES - January 24
13. Global Defence Force - PlayStation 2 - January 24
14. Darkwing Duck - NES - January 25
15. Tiny Toon Adventures - NES - January 26
16. Poi - Steam - January 28


February (18 Games Beaten)
17. Galaxy on Fire 2 Full HD - Steam - February 3
18. Final Fantasy Legend - Game Boy - February 5
19. Valkyrie Drive Bhikkhuni - Vita - February 5
20. Super Little Acorns 3D Turbo - 3DS - February 8
21. Adventures in Equica: Unicorn Training - Android - February 8
22. Final Fantasy: Mystic Quest - SNES - February 10
23. X-COM: UFO Defense - Steam - February 14
24. Ys IV: The Dawn of Ys -TurboGrafx-CD - February 18
25. Army Men - Game Boy Color - February 19
26. Army Men 2 - Game Boy Color - February 19
27. Army Men: Air Combat - Game Boy Color - February 20
28. Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA 2nd - PlayStation Portable - February 22
29. Army Men: Sarge's Heroes 2 - Game Boy Color - February 22
30. Army Men Advance - Game Boy Advance - February 24
31. Dynasty Warriors Gundam Reborn - PlayStation 3 - February 25
32. Army Men: Operation Green - Game Boy Advance - February 26
33. A Night Out - PC - February 27
34. Army Men: Turf Wars - Game Boy Advance - February 27


March (4 Games Beaten)
36. Phantasy Star - Master System - March 10*
37. Grand Kingdom - PlayStation 4 - March 17
38. Bit.Trip Beat - Wii - March 18
39. Bit.Trip Core - Wii - March 18


39. Bit.Trip Core - Wii - March 18

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Bit.Trip Core took the "really simple but surprisingly deep" gameplay style of Bit.Trip Beat and replicated it with a radically different style of play. Core also carries with it from Beat the phenomenal soundtrack and gameplay intricately and inherently tied to rhythm and music.

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Whereas Beat was Pong-cross-Guitar Hero, Core is harder to describe. The closest analogy I can think of would be an old tower defense-ish game (think Missile Command), but that's honestly not all that accurate, either. You control a....thing....in the middle of screen, and you can shoot in one of four directions; straight up, straight down, straight left, or straight right. The rhythm aspect here is that you have time your shots to hit the pixels right as they cross one of those four lines of fire. It starts off easy, but as you eventually get pixels coming at you constantly from every direction, it can get really confusing to keep straight what direction you need to shoot when. Difficulty aside, though, it's an EXTREMELY fun game and, in my opinion, more addicting than the first one.

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As was the case with Bit.Trip Beat, Bit.Trip Core has three levels - each much more difficult than the last - and a boss at the end of each level. I actually found Core to be a bit easier than Beat, but that might be because Core's controls use the Wiimote's D-pad rather than the gyroscope, and I have pretty shaky hands, making motion controls a bit imprecise for me even though I love them. Regardless of whether Core is a little tougher or Beat is a little tougher, what's certain is that Core is pretty much the perfect sequel. It took what made Beat fantastic and unique and applied that formula to a radically different gameplay style.

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Bit.Trip Core is a truly excellent follow up to Bit.Trip Beat, and while they're so different that it's hard to say whether or not it surpasses its predecessor, it's certainly a superb follow-up. It keeps the fantastic music and emphasis on rhythm and timing while having the actual gameplay rooted in a totally different format. This is how a series should progress in my opinion - taking a concept and expanding it rather than just doing the same thing but bigger and prettier each time.
Exhuminator wrote:Ecchi lords must unite for great justice.

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PresidentLeever
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by PresidentLeever Tue Mar 20, 2018 10:40 pm

1. Ys IV (PCE CD)
2. Exile (w/ Unworked Designs patch)(PCE CD)
3. Macross 2036 (PCE CD)
4. Sonic & All-Stars Racing Transformed (PC)
5. AM2R (PC)
6. TaleSpin (NES)
7. Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War II (PC)
8. Super Mario 64 (N64)
9. Star Fox 64 (N64)
10. Thunder Force V (US ver.)(PS1)
11. Kirby's Adventure Wii (Wii)
12. Caesar III (PC)
13. Final Fantasy Adventure (GB)
14. Star Wars: Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II (PC)
15. Märchen Maze (ARC)
16. Ys: The Ark of Napishtim (PC, 2015 ver.)
17. Darksiders II: Deathinitive Edition (PC)

I was kind of in two minds about this one and it took me months to complete due to padding, but ultimately the good outweighs the bad. Combat and dungeon designs are really strong, the atmosphere is great when exploring on your own and there's just enough customization to please number junkies.
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by ElkinFencer10 Wed Mar 21, 2018 7:30 am

Games Beaten in 2018 So Far - 40
* denotes a replay

January (16 Games Beaten)
1. Phantasy Star Portable - PlayStation Portable - January 1
2. Middle-Earth: Shadow of War - Xbox One - January 9
3. Duck Tales - NES - January 10
4. Yakuza Kiwami - PlayStation 4 - January 14
5. Xuan-Yuan Sword: The Gate of Firmament - PlayStation 4 - January 20
6. Doki Doki Literature Club - Steam - January 20
7. Deep Space Waifu - Steam - January 21
8. Turok: Dinosaur Hunter - Steam - January 21
9. Duck Tales 2 - NES - January 22
10. TaleSpin - NES - January 22
11. Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers - NES - January 23
12. Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers 2 - NES - January 24
13. Global Defence Force - PlayStation 2 - January 24
14. Darkwing Duck - NES - January 25
15. Tiny Toon Adventures - NES - January 26
16. Poi - Steam - January 28


February (18 Games Beaten)
17. Galaxy on Fire 2 Full HD - Steam - February 3
18. Final Fantasy Legend - Game Boy - February 5
19. Valkyrie Drive Bhikkhuni - Vita - February 5
20. Super Little Acorns 3D Turbo - 3DS - February 8
21. Adventures in Equica: Unicorn Training - Android - February 8
22. Final Fantasy: Mystic Quest - SNES - February 10
23. X-COM: UFO Defense - Steam - February 14
24. Ys IV: The Dawn of Ys -TurboGrafx-CD - February 18
25. Army Men - Game Boy Color - February 19
26. Army Men 2 - Game Boy Color - February 19
27. Army Men: Air Combat - Game Boy Color - February 20
28. Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA 2nd - PlayStation Portable - February 22
29. Army Men: Sarge's Heroes 2 - Game Boy Color - February 22
30. Army Men Advance - Game Boy Advance - February 24
31. Dynasty Warriors Gundam Reborn - PlayStation 3 - February 25
32. Army Men: Operation Green - Game Boy Advance - February 26
33. A Night Out - PC - February 27
34. Army Men: Turf Wars - Game Boy Advance - February 27


March (5 Games Beaten)
36. Phantasy Star - Master System - March 10*
37. Grand Kingdom - PlayStation 4 - March 17
38. Bit.Trip Beat - Wii - March 18
39. Bit.Trip Core - Wii - March 18
40. Bit.Trip Void - Wii - March 18


40. Bit.Trip Void - Wii - March 18

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Bit.Trip Void is the third game in the Bit.Trip series, and while it still very much keeps a lot of the style from Beat and Core, its reliance on rhythm is less than in its predecessors, and its visuals are less colorful. If you've played the first two games in the Bit.Trip series and - like me - love the soundtrack, don't worry about that; the music in Void fits right in with the two preceding games.

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Whereas Beat was like an evolved Pong, and Core was like an mutated tower defense, Void is sort of like a hybrid of Pac-man and Ikaruga. You play as a pixelated black circle (the "void" I assume), and the object of the game is to collect as many of the black dots that fly on screen as possible while avoiding the white dots. Every time you ingest a black dot, your circle grows larger and moves more slowly. You move with the Nunchuk control stick, and pressing A on the Wiimote returns your circle to the original size and speed. As was the case with Beat and Core, there are three levels with a boss at the end of each, and while this is probably the most of fun of the first three Bit.Trip games in my opinion, I also found it to be the most difficult towards the end of the last level.

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While Void is certainly not a monochrome game, since the player is all black and the dots with which you interact are either all black or all white, the game feels a lot less colorful than Beat or Core because the only thing that really has any real color is the background. The music fits right in with the other two games, but the visuals are definitely less interesting. Fortunately the gameplay is more than good enough to make up for the rather more muted visual presentation matching the addictivity of the first two Bit.Trip games perfectly.

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Bit.Trip Void is definitely a bit of a departure from Bit.Trip Beat and Bit.Trip Core, but the style and sound of the game is nevertheless very much in line with the first two in the series. It's a bit less rhythm-dependent than Beat or Core, but that's not to say that the music isn't on par with those two; it absolutely is. I found Void to be the most fun of the three I've played so far, personally, but I also found it to be the most challenging at the end of the third level. In contrast, however, I found it to be the easiest in the first two levels. There's a noticeable difficulty spike from level 2 (Ego) to level 3 (Superego), and if I were to make any solid complaint with the game, that would probably be it. It's still, however, ABSOLUTELY a must-play.
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prfsnl_gmr
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by prfsnl_gmr Wed Mar 21, 2018 8:08 am

1. Bastion (iOS)
2. LaserCat (360)
3. Zombie Incident (3DS)
4. Bye-Bye BoxBoy! (3DS)
5. Monument Valley 2 (iOS)
6. Zenge (iOS)
7. Master of Darkness (Game Gear/3DS)
8. Wonder Boy (SMS)
9. Full Throttle Remastered (iOS)
10. Adventure Island (NES)
11. Adventure Island II (NES)
12. Adventure Island (GB)
13. Super Adventure Island (SNES)
14. New Adventure Island (TG16)
15. Adventure Island III (NES)
16. The Legend of the Ghost Lion (NES)

I played The Legend of the Ghost Lion for Together Retro because it was released in the 1980s and the protagonist is a female. Otherwise, it is a slow-paced DQ clone, and it is a complete slog even when played at 160 FPS (i.e., four times normal speed). The dungeons are simple; the cryptic fetch quests are boring; and the battles are repetitive. Moreover, you gain levels by finding items, not by battling enemies; so, while the battles can be challenging and while the game actually has some interesting “summon” battle mechanics, all of the battles are ultimately pointless. (You do earn “rubies” in battle, but by the game’s mid-point, I had more than I could ever spend.) The game has deeply weird aesthetics, and it has good graphics. I can’t really recommend it, however.
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by Jagosaurus Wed Mar 21, 2018 10:29 am

I just wrapped up Dead Rising 2 last night. This is the most fun I've had with a "mindless" game in a long time. There was actually much more depth that I expected with always being against the clock, finding your daughter medicine, the variety of missions and side quests, RPG elements, combinging crazy weapons, and constant health/weapon inventory management as weapons break.

I've invested roughly 20 hours into this one and was at level 34 (max is 50) when the credits rolled. I met everything needed to unlock the additional Overtime cases. There are 7 to 10 endings in DR2 depending on how you count them. I just Googled the secondary "S" special ending FMV that plays after beating the extras. I think I'm okay just knowing that. Not looking to invest another 3 to 5 hours, if not more. Essentially I got Ending "A" with the opportunity to play another bonus day. I have enough I want to play that I'll likely move on to something else on my backlog.

As you can see below, I have been very Xbox heavy this year. Likely going to boot up a retro strategy RPG next. I should probably pick some shorter games :lol:

2018 Games Beaten:
1. Halo: Combat Evolved (oXbox)
2. Kameo: Elements of Power (360)
3. Halo 2 (oXbox, played upscaled on 360)
4. Dead Rising 2 (360)
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by BoneSnapDeez Wed Mar 21, 2018 10:07 pm

1. Antarctic Adventure (Famicom)
2. Nuts & Milk (Famicom)
3. Commando (Atari 2600)
4. Binary Land (Famicom)
5. Devil World (Famicom)
6. Disney's Aladdin (SNES)
7. Popeye (NES)
8. Super Mario Land (Game Boy)
9. Ys: The Vanished Omens (Sega Master System)
10 Ys II: Ancient Ys Vanished - The Final Chapter (Famicom)
11. Final Fantasy Mystic Quest (SNES)
12. Lunar: The Silver Star (Sega CD)
13. Otenba Becky no Daibouken (MSX)
14. Metroid (Famicom Disk System)
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I'll always remember Metroid as one of those "second wave" Nintendo classics. Released after the "black label" quick plays had come and gone, it's one of the earliest "complex" NES games, though its cover art still sports that definitive pixel art look. My experience with this game back in the day was analogous to my relationship with Zelda II. I'd throw Metroid in the ol' gray brick every other Sunday or so, get hopelessly lost, get boned, and then eventually quit in favor of something more palatable like Bases Loaded or Bad Dudes. As an adult I finally "buckled down" and finished this beast - multiple times - in a sort of reverse order: first on the GBA (with online level maps perpetually open before me), the NES, and finally, the subject of this very review, the Famicom Disk System.
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Yes, much like Super Mario Bros. 2 (either one), the first two Zelda and Castlevania games, and Kid Icarus, Metriod was released on disk format in Japan. As Famicom cart technology eventually "caught up" with disks, don't expect FDS Metroid to be much different than the version released in the West. There's no compelling reason for someone residing outside of Japan to play this, unless you're a completionist giga-nerd like myself. The biggest difference found here is that the disk original supports three save files. To delete a file one must select "KILL MODE." Yikes.

This is a landmark game, and a genre-creator. See, Metroid is a non-linear game; while most of this ilk released prior were RPG dungeon-crawlers or top-down action-adventure games, Metroid is instead a non-linear platformer. With the aid of Castlevania II (1987) the "Metroidvania" genre was thus born. No, these weren't the first two games created in this style, not by a longshot, but they refined the mechanics in such a way that inspired generations of imitators. Note that unlike many similar games that emerged during this golden era, Metroid is decidedly not an action-RPG. Problems can't be solved by level-grinding here; to guide Samus Aran to journey's end one must rely solely on their own wits and reflexes, plus the occasional power-up

Samus Aran: she's the hero of this game and all sequels to follow. Yes, she -- Samus is an early Japanese female protagonist, and undoubtedly the most important. Her debut role is a bit muddled however, as she dons a cybernetic space suit throughout her quest. Her sex can be revealed in-game, presented as a "reward" of sorts in a move that now feels a bit crass and dated. In later installments her character develops more into the hardened alien-destroyer we know and love today. Her mission is simple: infiltrate the planet Zebes and destroy the hostile alien entity known as "Mother Brain."
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Aesthetically, this game is bulletproof. It opens with what I submit, in my factual opinion, is the best title screen sequence ever before seen in a video game. A bold blocky title gives way to shooting stars, and then a simple paragraph of text emerges to relay the story. The spacial sky is empty save for a few twinkling stars; the terra firma a vague crusty mass. Accompanying the visuals is the first of Hirokazu Tanaka's brilliant compositions: simultaneously menacing and soothing. Upon game start, Samus finds herself in Brinstar, the first segment of Zebes. Great attention was paid to creating distinct corridors of the hostile planet. Brinstar is stony, replete with lava and platforms resembling petrified wood. Norfair is a colorful and frothy death swamp. Bosses reside in clinical mechanical futuristic hideouts, and the final area (Mother Brain's Tourian) showcases a cold black and white palette reminiscent of Ganon's lair in the original Zelda. Aside from the aforementioned title screen, the backing sky remains a stark black through the entire game, aiding in the creation of a feeling of utmost isolation. Tanaka's soundtrack deftly and slowly reveals itself: the game begins with a thumping percussion driven song as Samus sets off, eventually giving way to creepy alien (no pun intended) pieces that punctuate the terrors that lie ahead. Clocking in at a scant thirteen or so minutes, every bit of the soundtrack is a necessity, with each track inextricably linked to its given environment.

Samus begins her foray into Zebes comically underpowered, equipped with a short range three-directional arm cannon and possessing a scant thirty energy points (out of a then-possible maximum of 99). Success in Metroid is predicated on item acquisition. Immediately to the left of Samus' initial spawn point is the Maru Mari: an item that allows Samus to roll into a ball and navigate tight passages. Future equipment upgrades are obtained in special rooms, held aloft by the iconic Chozo avian-alien statues. Gun upgrades are a necessity, along with bombs, an armor boost, a high-jump power-up, and the signature screw attack. In addition to the "key" items are energy tanks and missiles found in droves: the former increases Samus' health bar permanently while the latter add to her cache of more powerful ammo. Missiles are queued up by pressing select, and are useful against bosses and tougher foes, and are also needed to blast open the otherwise impervious red door bubbles.

The game controls like a dream; it's shockingly fluid for 1986 standards. There are two different jumps, standard and spin, their initiation determined by the order of button presses (pressing jump and then a direction vs. pressing them together). The spin jump can be upgraded into a screw attack, whereupon Samus can demolish enemies mid-flight. Weapons are fun to play around with. There's an ice beam, which can predictably freeze enemies -- once in stasis foes can be used as impromptu platforms. There's also a wave beam that lacks the freeze capabilities but travels across the screen in a massive sine wave type of motion. Perfect for mowing down huge swaths of enemies at once. Bombs (laid while in ball form) are effective against ground enemies, as well as revealing the locations of hidden passages. They can also be used as a boost, propelling balled-up Samus into the air into otherwise unreachable corridors. There's a bit of a "loosey goosey" feel to Samus' overall maneuverability. The game is highly exploitable. Items can easily be gathered in the "wrong" order, areas uncovered well before the "appropriate" conditions have been fulfilled, and so on.

The various labyrinths of Zebes are inhabited by some devilishly fearsome extraterrestrial foes. There is the requisite display of palette swapping, sure, but that doesn't diminish the creativity of these creature designs. "Crawlers" stick to whatever surface they encounter, looping endlessly around scenery until destroyed. There are flying monsters that emerge from pipes in an ceaseless spamming procession. Mutant arthropods swoop and swing from surfaces. Dragons inhabit lava, popping up to deliver a flaming breath. The eponymous "Metroids" appear late-game, intent on rapidly sucking HP from Samus. Defeating these bubbled and clawed monstrosities requires both a freeze attack followed by a steady barrage of missiles. Only a trio of bosses inhabit the planet. Though fearsome in design, they're a bit of a letdown in terms of strategy -- they're bullet sponges, easily (but tediously) dispatched if Samus initiates combat with an ample supply of health and missiles.
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Metroid has some issues. It's an oft-repeated cliché (and one I use rarely), but the game has aged poorly. There are nagging flaws, not due to any developer sloth or malice, but instead owing to the typical game design of the era. There's no in-game map. Not a deal-breaker in and of itself, but the world of Zebes is extraordinarily difficult to self-map proportionately as it's not laid out in the grid-like structure found in old RPGs (and Zelda for that matter). Key items are well-hidden to the point of absurdity. One must employ a "shoot every wall" strategy to uncover some of the trickier energy tanks, for instance. Certain lava pits are inescapable, while others are comprised of false lava. There's no inventory screen, and gaining one weapon upgrade overrides the previous one. In fact, during the course of a "standard" playthrough one is expected to get ice, wave, and then ice again -- it's odd. Then there's the extremely harsh Game Over penalty -- wherein Samus retains her upgrades and max HP stat, but her actual HP is reduced back to 30. A fair bit of "grinding" is then required to get back on track. Like Zelda and other early lengthy Famicom and FDS titles, saving the game is essentially synonymous with a Game Over, with the same "penalties" applied upon rebooting. And there are no save points either, so saving itself is initiated upon loss of life or pressing the correct combo of buttons on the second controller.

Small annoyances aside, Metroid is more than worthy of its status as an all-time legend. Its atmosphere is unmatched and the creepy perilous character and environmental designs remain ever-relevant. The game still ranks higher than most of its respective sequels, and is also one of the finest gems of its genre. While the earliest examples of, say, platformers and RPGs now feel a bit questionable when viewed through a modern lens, anyone wishing the experience all the "Metroidvania" genre has to offer would do well to head back to the origins.
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by MrPopo Wed Mar 21, 2018 11:03 pm

Did you ever play Metroid II on the GB? That one I think suffers even more from the lack of a map, because it's much larger and the map doesn't logically work (whereas all of Metroid's map fits together into a single rectangle).
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Games Beaten: 2015 2016 2017 2018
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prfsnl_gmr
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by prfsnl_gmr Thu Mar 22, 2018 12:00 pm

Metroid II on the Gameboy is like that. Its saving grace, ironically, is that it is so linear.

.....

1. Bastion (iOS)
2. LaserCat (360)
3. Zombie Incident (3DS)
4. Bye-Bye BoxBoy! (3DS)
5. Monument Valley 2 (iOS)
6. Zenge (iOS)
7. Master of Darkness (Game Gear/3DS)
8. Wonder Boy (SMS)
9. Full Throttle Remastered (iOS)
10. Adventure Island (NES)
11. Adventure Island II (NES)
12. Adventure Island (GB)
13. Super Adventure Island (SNES)
14. New Adventure Island (TG16)
15. Adventure Island III (NES)
16. The Legend of the Ghost Lion (NES)
17. Part Time UFO (iOS)
18. Adventure Island II: Aliens in Paradise (GB)


Part Time UFO Is a delightful little game from HAL in which you guide a little UFO as he studies Earth’s work culture by taking on some part-time jobs. He has a little claw arm - similar to the one you use to pick up stuffed animals in the various incarnations of the claw game - and you use it to do things like build a temple, go fishing, stack pancakes, pick vegetables, etc. As you earn money, you can buy outfits for you little UFO, and you unlock more levels by earning medals on each level. (You earn medals by completing the jobs quickly, going above and beyond your job duties, and uncovering Easter eggs. There are three medals for each job, and the game offers clues regarding how to obtain them.) The game is the definition of short-but-sweet, and it never wears out its welcome. It also oozes charm, with a cameo from Boxboy to graphics and sound that mimic late GBA releases. I highly recommend this game.

Adventure Island II: Aliens in Paradise Is another example of the portable Adventure Island games being drastically better than their NES counterparts. It is also an example of how small concessions to the player can alter a game’s quality tremendously. In this case, Adventure Island II: Aliens in Paradise is drastically better than Adventure Island III and mostly because it features: (1) an overworld map indicating when levels have secret exits; and (2) a password feature. (It also controls slightly better and toned down its counterpart’s difficulty a bit.) I had a great time with this game, and I think it deserves a spot with SML2 as one of the system’s very best platformers. Highly recommended.

Only three more Adventure Island games to go before I have run the series. I have Adventure Island IV, a late Famicom “metroidvania” up next, and I am really looking forward to it.
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