Anything that is gaming related that doesn't fit well anywhere else
User avatar
ElkinFencer10
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 7365
Joined: Fri Aug 13, 2010 8:34 pm
Location: Henderson, North Carolina

Re: Games Beaten 2018

by ElkinFencer10 Wed Dec 19, 2018 8:26 am

Games Beaten in 2018 So Far - 102
* denotes a replay

January (16 Games Beaten)
1. Phantasy Star Portable - PlayStation Portable - January 1
2. Middle-Earth: Shadow of War - Xbox One - January 9
3. Duck Tales - NES - January 10
4. Yakuza Kiwami - PlayStation 4 - January 14
5. Xuan-Yuan Sword: The Gate of Firmament - PlayStation 4 - January 20
6. Doki Doki Literature Club - Steam - January 20
7. Deep Space Waifu - Steam - January 21
8. Turok: Dinosaur Hunter - Steam - January 21
9. Duck Tales 2 - NES - January 22
10. TaleSpin - NES - January 22
11. Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers - NES - January 23
12. Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers 2 - NES - January 24
13. Global Defence Force - PlayStation 2 - January 24
14. Darkwing Duck - NES - January 25
15. Tiny Toon Adventures - NES - January 26
16. Poi - Steam - January 28


February (18 Games Beaten)
17. Galaxy on Fire 2 Full HD - Steam - February 3
18. Final Fantasy Legend - Game Boy - February 5
19. Valkyrie Drive Bhikkhuni - Vita - February 5
20. Super Little Acorns 3D Turbo - 3DS - February 8
21. Adventures in Equica: Unicorn Training - Android - February 8
22. Final Fantasy: Mystic Quest - SNES - February 10
23. X-COM: UFO Defense - Steam - February 14
24. Ys IV: The Dawn of Ys -TurboGrafx-CD - February 18
25. Army Men - Game Boy Color - February 19
26. Army Men 2 - Game Boy Color - February 19
27. Army Men: Air Combat - Game Boy Color - February 20
28. Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA 2nd - PlayStation Portable - February 22
29. Army Men: Sarge's Heroes 2 - Game Boy Color - February 22
30. Army Men Advance - Game Boy Advance - February 24
31. Dynasty Warriors Gundam Reborn - PlayStation 3 - February 25
32. Army Men: Operation Green - Game Boy Advance - February 26
33. A Night Out - PC - February 27
34. Army Men: Turf Wars - Game Boy Advance - February 27


March (10 Games Beaten)
35. Phantasy Star - Master System - March 10*
36. Grand Kingdom - PlayStation 4 - March 17
37. Bit.Trip Beat - Wii - March 18
38. Bit.Trip Core - Wii - March 18
39. Bit.Trip Void - Wii - March 18
40. Bit.Trip Runner - Wii - March 22
41. Bit.Trip Fate - Wii - March 22
42. Bit.Trip Flux - Wii - March 24
43. Bit.Trip Runner 2: Future Legend of Rhythm Alien - Wii U - March 25
44. My Nintendo Picross: Legend of Zelda - Twilight Princess - 3DS - March 28


April (7 Games Beaten)
45. Gundam Breaker 3 - PlayStation 4 - April 4
46. Night Trap - PlayStation 4 - April 5
47. Corpse Killer - Sega CD 32X - April 9
48. Corpse Killer - Saturn - April 11*
49. Area 51 - Saturn - April 16*
50. Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers - Sega CD - April 17
51. SD Gundam G Generation Genesis - PlayStation 4 - April 28*


May (6 Games Beaten)
52. Detention - PlayStation 4 - May
53. Guacamelee - Wii U - May 6
54. EDGE - Wii U - May 7
55. RUSH - Wii U - May 9
56. Pokemon Snap - Nintendo 64 - May 27
57. Doom VFR - PS VR - May 27


June (20 Games Beaten)
58. Jurassic Pinball - Switch - June 8
59. Shaq Fu: A Legend Reborn - Switch - June 9
60. Lost Sphear - Switch - June 11
61. Medal of Honor Heroes 2 - Wii - June 12
62. Medal of Honor: Vanguard - Wii - June 14
63. Pokemon Quest - Switch - June 15
64. Persona Q: Shadow of the Labyrinth - 3DS - June 17
65. Art of Balance - Wii U - June 17
66. Bloodstained: Curse of the Moon - Switch - June 18
67. DmC Devil May Cry - PlayStation 4 - June 19
68. DmC Devil May Cry: Vergil's Downfall - PlayStation 4 - June 19
69. Assassin's Creed Rogue - PlayStation 3 - June 20
70. Assassin's Creed Unity - Xbox One - June 21
71. Assassin's Creed Chronicles: China - Xbox One - June 22
72. Assassin's Creed Chronicles: India - Xbox One - June 23
73. Assassin's Creed Chronicles: Russia - Xbox One - June 24
74. New Gundam Breaker - PlayStation 4 - June 24
75. Eat Lead: The Return of Matt Hazard - PlayStation 3 - June 25
76. Assassin's Creed Syndicate - Xbox One - June 29
77. Ride to Hell: Retribution - Xbox 360 - June 30


July (8 Games Beaten)
78. Broforce - PlayStation 4 - July 4
79. Just Cause 2 - PlayStation 3 - July 4
80. Barack Fu: The Adventures of Dirty Barry - Switch - July 5
81. Organ Trail - PlayStation 4 - July 5
82. Red Dead Revolver - Xbox - July 7
83. Omega Quintet - PlayStation 4 - July 13
84. Super Mario Sunshine - Gamecube - July 16
85. Nurse Love Addiction - Vita - July 17


August (4 Games Beaten)
86. XCOM 2: War of the Chosen - PS4 - August 3
87. Life is Strange: Before the Storm - PS4 - August 3
88. Game of Thrones - PS4 - August 5
89. Star Trek - Steam - August 6


September (1 Game Beaten)
90. Pokemon Vega - Game Boy Advance - September 18


October (6 Games Beaten)
91. Panzer Dragoon Mini - Game Gear - October 5
92. Advance Wars - Game Boy Advance - October 7
93. Valkyria Chronicles 4 - Switch - October 18
94. Mario Tennis Aces - Switch - October 21
95. Girls und Panzer: Dream Tank Match - PS4 - October 21
96. Banner Saga - Steam - October 23


November (2 Games Beaten)
97. Xenogears - PlayStation - November 12
98. Persona 3: Dancing in Moonlight - PlayStation Vita - November 15


December (4 Games Beaten)
99. Super Smash Bros Ultimate - Switch - December 10
100. Pokemon Let's Go, Pikachu! - Switch - December 12
101. Starlink: Battle for Atlas - Switch - December 16
102. Ace of Seafood - PlayStation 4 - December 16


102. Ace of Seafood - PlayStation 4 - December 16

Image

Ace of Seafood is a masterpiece. It's an absolute masterpiece. Just like Epic Dumpster Bear was for Wii U, Ace of Seafood is a bizarre indie game that scratches an itch you never knew you had - conquering the seas as a fish that shoots lasers out of its mouth. Seriously, that's the whole game. Humans have been wiped out in some nuclear war, and now fish fight for oceanic supremacy with lasers. It's the most gloriously stupid concept I've ever heard.

Image

When you first start the game, you get to pick between three different starter fish, and from there, you have to kill whatever fish you come across and absorb their genetic material. If you get enough genetic material of a certain type of fish, you unlock the ability to breed that fish. Some of these fish are small, weak, and easy to breed like a hermit crab or a sardine. Some of these fish are big, expensive, and pack some serious muscle like the bluefin tuna and the leopard seal. Some of these fish are massive, behemoth boss-tier fish with a price tag to match like the great white shark or the giant squid. Depending on how many reefs you've found and secured, your resource pool for your school of fish increases. This will allow you to add more fish to your school and add better fish to your school. A sardine, for example, takes 10 school resources to add; the giant squid takes 300 school resources. It's all about picking the right tool for the job.

Image

Bizarrely, there are also human ships that you can destroy and collect "genetic" material for to "breed." I don't really get why this is a thing - all the humans are dead, and boats aren't genetic anyway - but whatever, I can have a nuclear submarine fight alongside my giant squid and great white shark. I'm NOT complaining, that's freaking dope. One specific reef leads to the final boss, but it doesn't tell you this until you're there. You're just wandering around, minding your own business, and you beat the guardian fish for this reef, and you enter the reef to save and heal. Next thing you know, it throws you straight into a battle (after auto-saving and healing you, thankfully) with a genetically engineered super fish bio-weapon. That's a tough fight, to say the least, but when you beat Metal Fish Solid (not really the name. Just my dumb nickname), you're rewarded with the end credits. It then puts you back in the ocean by the reef to continue your conquest if you so wish along with some huge schools of invading fish that spawn and must be repelled. I mean, you could ignore them, but where's the fun in that? MUCHO MARINE MASSACRE MAYHEM!!

Image

Ace of Seafood is my new second favorite indie game ever. Epic Dumpster Bear will always be #1 in my heart, but holy crap, Ace of Seafood is absolutely incredible. Objectively speaking, it's not perfect. The targeting can be a little bit finicky, the menus are fairly bare bones with minimal explanations save for the tutorial that's either go through the whole thing again or go through none of it. What it may lack in the final polish that games with the funding and manpower of big development teams or publishers, however, it MORE than makes up for in charm and sheer bizarre awesomeness.
Exhuminator wrote:Ecchi lords must unite for great justice.

Image
User avatar
prfsnl_gmr
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 10039
Joined: Mon Jun 01, 2009 10:26 pm
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina

Re: Games Beaten 2018

by prfsnl_gmr Wed Dec 19, 2018 8:59 am

:shock:

Amazing! I had no idea. Great review, Elkin!
User avatar
ElkinFencer10
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 7365
Joined: Fri Aug 13, 2010 8:34 pm
Location: Henderson, North Carolina

Re: Games Beaten 2018

by ElkinFencer10 Wed Dec 19, 2018 9:18 am

prfsnl_gmr wrote::shock:

Amazing! I had no idea. Great review, Elkin!

Thanks. I thought of you the whole time I playing this. It's the same kind of WTF crazy as Epic Dumpster Bear. It's only on Wii U in Japan, but it's on Switch, PS4, Windows, and Android in the States.
Exhuminator wrote:Ecchi lords must unite for great justice.

Image
User avatar
BoneSnapDeez
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 18815
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 1:08 pm
Location: Maine

Re: Games Beaten 2018

by BoneSnapDeez Wed Dec 19, 2018 6:58 pm

1. Antarctic Adventure (Famicom)
2. Nuts & Milk (Famicom)
3. Commando (Atari 2600)
4. Binary Land (Famicom)
5. Devil World (Famicom)
6. Disney's Aladdin (SNES)
7. Popeye (NES)
8. Super Mario Land (Game Boy)
9. Ys: The Vanished Omens (Sega Master System)
10 Ys II: Ancient Ys Vanished - The Final Chapter (Famicom)
11. Final Fantasy Mystic Quest (SNES)
12. Lunar: The Silver Star (Sega CD)
13. Otenba Becky no Daibouken (MSX)
14. Metroid (Famicom Disk System)
15. Mahou Kishi Rayearth (Game Boy)
16. Wabbit (Atari 2600)
17. Kirby's Dream Land (Game Boy)
18. Warpman (Famicom)
19. Final Fantasy (NES)
20. Transformers: Convoy no Nazo (Famicom)
21. Arcade Archives: Moon Patrol (Switch eShop)
22. Gremlins (Atari 2600)
23. Arcade Archives: Ninja-Kid (Switch eShop)
24. Shining in the Darkness (Genesis)
25. Johnny Turbo's Arcade: Gate of Doom (Switch eShop)
26. Front Line (Atari 2600)
27. Donkey Kong 3 (NES)
28. Super Mario Land 2: 6 Golden Coins (Game Boy)
29. Exerion (Famicom)
30. Johnny Turbo's Arcade: Bad Dudes (Switch eShop)
31. Arcade Archives: Double Dragon (Switch eShop)
32. ACA NeoGeo: Ninja Combat (Switch eShop)
33. Johnny Turbo's Arcade: Wizard Fire (Switch eShop)
34. Super Mario Land 3: Wario Land (Game Boy)
35. Virtual Boy Wario Land (Virtual Boy)
36. Grand Master (Famicom)
37. Johnny Turbo's Arcade: Sly Spy (Switch eShop)
38. ACA NeoGeo: Top Hunter Roddy & Cathy (Switch eShop)
39. ACA NeoGeo: Shock Troopers (Switch eShop)
40. Donkey Kong Country (SNES)
41. Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (SNES)
42. Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble! (SNES)
43. Kangaroo (Atari 2600)
44. New Super Mario Bros. (DS)
45. Giana Sisters DS (DS)
46. - 52. Metal Slug Anthology (PSP)
53. Gorf (Atari 2600)
54. Phoenix (Atari 2600)
55. Mario Bros. (NES)
56. Balloon Kid (Game Boy)
57. Esper Dream (Famicom Disk System)
58. Arcade Archives: Traverse USA (Switch eShop)
59. Kouryu Densetsu Villgust (Super Famicom)
60. King Kong (Atari 2600)
61. Donkey Kong (Atari 2600)
62. Donkey Kong Junior (Atari 2600)
63. Sukeban Deka II: Shoujo Tekkamen Densetsu (Mark III)

64. The Lost Vikings (SNES)
Image

It's no secret that retro Western platformers have a reputation of being questionable at best. Especially those that existed on consoles. Sometimes, gameplay was diluted in an Amiga-to-SNES conversion; but oftentimes these titles were irredeemable from the get-go. One standout among the slovenly masses was The Lost Vikings (1993). This one was an oddity: developed initially and specifically for the SNES hardware by Blizzard (yes, that Blizzard of Diablo fame, though back in '93 they were called Silicon & Synapse), The Lost Vikings not only revolutionized the fledgling "puzzle-platformer" genre but also managed to outperform many of the established Japanese titans.

Comparisons to Lemmings are inevitable. Both games are predicated on leading not a singular protagonist, but a posse, from entrance to exit. But while Lemmings saw the player utilize a cursor to assign "jobs" to the mindless hordes, The Lost Vikings gives one full control over a trio of heroes. The rub is that the three vikings have entirely separate attributes. Erik the Swift is the only character with jumping abilities, and thus the only one who can immediately clear a hole or spike pit. He can also run, and subsequently bash his head into walls, ideally revealing an item cache or hidden passageway. Said charges can technically damage enemies, though it's a risky maneuver. Baleog the Fierce, as his title suggests, is endowed with offensive attributes. He's equipped both with a sword-range (sword) and long-range weapon (arrows), the latter of which can additionally be used to trip various switches. Olaf the Stout brings the defense. He carries a shield, which will not only block his own mass from most enemy attacks but can also provide refuge for his bros. Said shield has a secondary use; Olaf can lift it above his head and slowly glide down winding vertical shafts otherwise inaccessible to his compatriots.

These poor vikings are indeed "lost" in the literal sense. While chillin' in their village with hot viking mistresses and helmeted babies, they find themselves abducted by an evil alien lord named Tomator (who looks nothing like a tomato). The first few stages see the vikings attempt to escape from Tomator's spaceship. They are initially successful - sort of, as it's soon revealed that home can only be reached by first traversing several distinct worlds connected via "timewarps." It's a fundamentally silly plot, but one that gave the developers an excuse to showcase some wild and weird environments including a historically inaccurate prehistoric landscape, a hostile Ancient Egypt, a high-tech industrial factory, and a trippy fever dream "Candy Land," before looping back to deep space for a titillating climax.

All levels, save for the initial "tutorial" stage, are structured in the same fashion. Erik, Baleog, and Olaf begin clustered together, and must later reunite at a specific exit point. Vikings are not controlled simultaneously, but separately. Switching between each is seamless, with a simple press of the L and R buttons. Each vikings has three hit points of health, and a limited inventory, though items can be shared between vikings standing in close proximity. Vikings not controlled by the player are simply left standing (or, falling or bouncing) wherever they are abandoned -- either on or off-screen.

The "flow" of the game is perhaps best illustrated by providing concrete examples. The first cluster of outer space stages are simple enough. Use Erik to leap for the occasional key, Baleog is on alien-slaying duty, while Olaf provides the otf-needed cover. There are elevators to descend and anti-gravitational chambers (with insta-death lasers on the ceiling) to contend with -- both pretty self-explanatory. Come prehistory and things are kicked up a notch. The Lost Vikings is brilliant in how it slowly and subtly introduces the player to new gimmicks. There's never any hand-holding, but the game will drop a simple block of text periodically to keep us viking-wranglers up to date. So, a prehistoric stage can see Olaf block a fire-breathing dinosaur maw with his shield while Erik snags a key -- but then Erik can't continue because a duo of long-haired mammals are attempting to steamroll his scrawny behind, so we'll have Baleog steady himself to slay them, but Olaf could be useful here for his blocking abilities, but first we must delicately remove him from fire-blocking duty without getting singed, and then oh no the mammals are continually pushing Olaf towards lava while he blocks, so we gotta switch between having Baleog attack and Olaf move forward a few steps at a time to avoid getting tossed to his doom.

The aforementioned example encapsulates only about thirty seconds of gameplay, by the way. The Lost Vikings is truly an ingenious blend of puzzle and platforming elements (hence the genre tag) -- gray matter is just as essential here as twitchy fingers. The game steadfastly refuses to get stale by ramping up complexity (and sometimes downright insanity) in each sequential stage. Ancient Egypt brings forth climbable tree puzzles, godforsaken jumping enemies, and a downright nasty Tetris tribute where Erik must weave and dodge falling blocks. Factory segments make use of gadgets, magnets, and springs and trampolines that lend jumping abilities to the otherwise grounded duo of Baleog and Olaf. "Candy Land" is where many players will be tapping out for a break, featuring some truly analytical traps and puzzles. As for that last cluster of space stages, consider it a final exam, the culmination of all previously-acquired viking skills. It gets tough here, folks.

And while The Lost Vikings makes no bones about beating the player into submission, it's also strangely forgiving. In short, it features the same sort of life and continue system as Lemmings. Which is to say, there are no lives and continues. Get boned? Oh well, try again. Need a break? Every single stage has a password, each one being vowelless, four characters, and a reference to the environment in question. So, for instance, that stage with the all the bubbles? The password is BBLS. The one with the trampolines: H0PP. You won't even need to write these down. One strange quirk about The Lost Vikings is that, while all three characters are required to reach the exit to finish out a level, if one or two expires along the way the stage can still be explored but not beaten. It's not quite understood why this is allowed -- perhaps to give the player a chance to explore and learn from his or her mistakes. In any event, there's also a "suicide" option to immediately restart a given stage.

Punctuating the excellent gameplay is a quirky sense of style. All three vikings are cornballs. They joke, rib, jab, and mock. This even breaks the fourth wall occasionally: lose too many times, prepare to be insulted. Each member of the trio has his own personality. Erik is (somewhat) grounded but impatient, Baleog attempts to solve everything with violence ("bashing"), while Olaf is obsessed with food. Dialogue is frequent, though never overwhelming. There are some laugh-out-loud moments, and far too many pop culture references. The accompanying animations and sound effects arguably outdo the dialogue. The vikings flex, pick their noses, burp, and Olaf proudly displays crack upon reaching the apex of a ladder. Enemy designs are similarly silly, as are the cartoony R.I.P. headstones that pop up immediately upon their demise. The juxtaposition of high difficulty and goofy aesthetics is a pretty common retro gaming trope, and is mostly successful here.

Game controls are much more rigid than those of a "pure" platformer, which may be off-putting to some first-time players. Enemies, for instance, are true obstacles. There's no mercy invincibility upon being hit, and no recovery time. Somewhat paradoxically, foes that emit projectiles can only damage the vikings with said projectiles; the enemy sprites themselves can simply be run through. For such a complex game, one that requires the player juggle three protagonists, most everything flows smoothly. "Menus" are rarely utilized, and never obstruct the player's view of the action. The game can be "paused" but it's usually a short-lived affair, used for selecting particular item or transferring it from one viking to the next.

Visually, The Lost Vikings is competent, though not extraordinary. It's colorful, with a gentle soft palette. Backgrounds are well-drawn, though inherently simplistic and nondistracting. There are some really nice larger pieces of artwork found herein, specifically the giant viking portrait that graces the title screen as well as the oddly soothing "Game Over" (resurrection) animation. The original soundtrack is just fantastic. It wastes no time establishing itself -- the title theme begins with regal brass before segueing into a funky techno beat. The other tracks follow suit: plenty of pelting electronics, groovy bass, slick drumlines. The only issue is that there simply isn't enough music to go around. Each world features only a singular theme that repeats in every level. The prehistoric world, for instance, consists of outdoor forests as well as subterranean caverns. It would have been nice to have two different tracks for these varying locales.

Holistically, this is a brilliant game. It's like nothing else before it, and like nothing else since (save for the direct sequel). Forget the niche "puzzle-platformer" tag, this is one of the strongest 2D platformers ever made, period. Technically, it's incredibly impressive. Personally, I just can't get enough of it. Certainly one of the most overlooked retro games out there, the very definition of a hidden gem.
User avatar
prfsnl_gmr
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 10039
Joined: Mon Jun 01, 2009 10:26 pm
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina

Re: Games Beaten 2018

by prfsnl_gmr Thu Dec 20, 2018 12:03 am

ElkinFencer10 wrote:
prfsnl_gmr wrote::shock:

Amazing! I had no idea. Great review, Elkin!

Thanks. I thought of you the whole time I playing this. It's the same kind of WTF crazy as Epic Dumpster Bear. It's only on Wii U in Japan, but it's on Switch, PS4, Windows, and Android in the States.


But not on Wii U in the States! The injustice!!! :lol:

.....

Also, Lost Vikings rules. You’ve beaten the sequel too, I hope?
User avatar
ElkinFencer10
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 7365
Joined: Fri Aug 13, 2010 8:34 pm
Location: Henderson, North Carolina

Re: Games Beaten 2018

by ElkinFencer10 Thu Dec 20, 2018 8:50 am

Games Beaten in 2018 So Far - 103
* denotes a replay

January (16 Games Beaten)
1. Phantasy Star Portable - PlayStation Portable - January 1
2. Middle-Earth: Shadow of War - Xbox One - January 9
3. Duck Tales - NES - January 10
4. Yakuza Kiwami - PlayStation 4 - January 14
5. Xuan-Yuan Sword: The Gate of Firmament - PlayStation 4 - January 20
6. Doki Doki Literature Club - Steam - January 20
7. Deep Space Waifu - Steam - January 21
8. Turok: Dinosaur Hunter - Steam - January 21
9. Duck Tales 2 - NES - January 22
10. TaleSpin - NES - January 22
11. Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers - NES - January 23
12. Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers 2 - NES - January 24
13. Global Defence Force - PlayStation 2 - January 24
14. Darkwing Duck - NES - January 25
15. Tiny Toon Adventures - NES - January 26
16. Poi - Steam - January 28


February (18 Games Beaten)
17. Galaxy on Fire 2 Full HD - Steam - February 3
18. Final Fantasy Legend - Game Boy - February 5
19. Valkyrie Drive Bhikkhuni - Vita - February 5
20. Super Little Acorns 3D Turbo - 3DS - February 8
21. Adventures in Equica: Unicorn Training - Android - February 8
22. Final Fantasy: Mystic Quest - SNES - February 10
23. X-COM: UFO Defense - Steam - February 14
24. Ys IV: The Dawn of Ys -TurboGrafx-CD - February 18
25. Army Men - Game Boy Color - February 19
26. Army Men 2 - Game Boy Color - February 19
27. Army Men: Air Combat - Game Boy Color - February 20
28. Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA 2nd - PlayStation Portable - February 22
29. Army Men: Sarge's Heroes 2 - Game Boy Color - February 22
30. Army Men Advance - Game Boy Advance - February 24
31. Dynasty Warriors Gundam Reborn - PlayStation 3 - February 25
32. Army Men: Operation Green - Game Boy Advance - February 26
33. A Night Out - PC - February 27
34. Army Men: Turf Wars - Game Boy Advance - February 27


March (10 Games Beaten)
35. Phantasy Star - Master System - March 10*
36. Grand Kingdom - PlayStation 4 - March 17
37. Bit.Trip Beat - Wii - March 18
38. Bit.Trip Core - Wii - March 18
39. Bit.Trip Void - Wii - March 18
40. Bit.Trip Runner - Wii - March 22
41. Bit.Trip Fate - Wii - March 22
42. Bit.Trip Flux - Wii - March 24
43. Bit.Trip Runner 2: Future Legend of Rhythm Alien - Wii U - March 25
44. My Nintendo Picross: Legend of Zelda - Twilight Princess - 3DS - March 28


April (7 Games Beaten)
45. Gundam Breaker 3 - PlayStation 4 - April 4
46. Night Trap - PlayStation 4 - April 5
47. Corpse Killer - Sega CD 32X - April 9
48. Corpse Killer - Saturn - April 11*
49. Area 51 - Saturn - April 16*
50. Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers - Sega CD - April 17
51. SD Gundam G Generation Genesis - PlayStation 4 - April 28*


May (6 Games Beaten)
52. Detention - PlayStation 4 - May
53. Guacamelee - Wii U - May 6
54. EDGE - Wii U - May 7
55. RUSH - Wii U - May 9
56. Pokemon Snap - Nintendo 64 - May 27
57. Doom VFR - PS VR - May 27


June (20 Games Beaten)
58. Jurassic Pinball - Switch - June 8
59. Shaq Fu: A Legend Reborn - Switch - June 9
60. Lost Sphear - Switch - June 11
61. Medal of Honor Heroes 2 - Wii - June 12
62. Medal of Honor: Vanguard - Wii - June 14
63. Pokemon Quest - Switch - June 15
64. Persona Q: Shadow of the Labyrinth - 3DS - June 17
65. Art of Balance - Wii U - June 17
66. Bloodstained: Curse of the Moon - Switch - June 18
67. DmC Devil May Cry - PlayStation 4 - June 19
68. DmC Devil May Cry: Vergil's Downfall - PlayStation 4 - June 19
69. Assassin's Creed Rogue - PlayStation 3 - June 20
70. Assassin's Creed Unity - Xbox One - June 21
71. Assassin's Creed Chronicles: China - Xbox One - June 22
72. Assassin's Creed Chronicles: India - Xbox One - June 23
73. Assassin's Creed Chronicles: Russia - Xbox One - June 24
74. New Gundam Breaker - PlayStation 4 - June 24
75. Eat Lead: The Return of Matt Hazard - PlayStation 3 - June 25
76. Assassin's Creed Syndicate - Xbox One - June 29
77. Ride to Hell: Retribution - Xbox 360 - June 30


July (8 Games Beaten)
78. Broforce - PlayStation 4 - July 4
79. Just Cause 2 - PlayStation 3 - July 4
80. Barack Fu: The Adventures of Dirty Barry - Switch - July 5
81. Organ Trail - PlayStation 4 - July 5
82. Red Dead Revolver - Xbox - July 7
83. Omega Quintet - PlayStation 4 - July 13
84. Super Mario Sunshine - Gamecube - July 16
85. Nurse Love Addiction - Vita - July 17


August (4 Games Beaten)
86. XCOM 2: War of the Chosen - PS4 - August 3
87. Life is Strange: Before the Storm - PS4 - August 3
88. Game of Thrones - PS4 - August 5
89. Star Trek - Steam - August 6


September (1 Game Beaten)
90. Pokemon Vega - Game Boy Advance - September 18


October (6 Games Beaten)
91. Panzer Dragoon Mini - Game Gear - October 5
92. Advance Wars - Game Boy Advance - October 7
93. Valkyria Chronicles 4 - Switch - October 18
94. Mario Tennis Aces - Switch - October 21
95. Girls und Panzer: Dream Tank Match - PS4 - October 21
96. Banner Saga - Steam - October 23


November (2 Games Beaten)
97. Xenogears - PlayStation - November 12
98. Persona 3: Dancing in Moonlight - PlayStation Vita - November 15


December (5 Games Beaten)
99. Super Smash Bros Ultimate - Switch - December 10
100. Pokemon Let's Go, Pikachu! - Switch - December 12
101. Starlink: Battle for Atlas - Switch - December 16
102. Ace of Seafood - PlayStation 4 - December 16
103. Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus - Switch - December 18


103. Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus - Switch - December 18

Image

Question - what's better than brutally slaughtering Nazis and white robed Klansmen?

Answer - brutally slaughtering Nazis and white robed Klansmen on the go.

This is the beautiful world we entered when Bethesda had the brilliant minds at Panic Button port their Nazi-killing masterpiece Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus to Nintendo Switch. Crated with the same brilliance and attention to detail as Panic Button's previous but no less impressive Doom port, shows once again that when in the hands of talent developers, the Switch is not only the little system that could but the little system that does more than it has any business being capable of doing.

Image

Since I already reviewed this game on Xbox One when it first came out, this is going to be a shorter review as I'm primarily going to focus on some comparisons between my experience with the game on the two different platforms as well as how it generally looks, sounds, and plays on Switch. As one would naturally expect when going from a 4K-capable console to a handheld, the visuals took a big hit on Switch, but as was the case with Doom, it's not as bad as one might reasonably assume. The resolution took a BIG hit - it drops down to the sub-SD resolution of 360p - but the trade off is that most of the lighting effects are kept intact (albeit blurry) and the frame rate is shockingly stable. That was one of my few issues with Panic Button's Switch port of Doom - the frame rate was fairly unstable depending on how many enemies were on screen. I didn't notice any of those issues in Wolfenstein II. It seems that the variable resolution system was much improved for this port, and it really shows where performance is concerned.

Image

Stemming from the necessary visual downgrades comes a similar situation to the Doom port. As was the case with Doom, the game looks pretty terrible when playing docked, but it looks totally fine when playing handheld. Its visual downgrades are still apparent, mind you. The small screen hides a lot of the game's visual flaws and blemishes, and the end result is that while it may look pretty disappointing on a 65" TV screen, it looks totally fine on a screen 90% smaller. The cutscenes, it's worth noting, look much nicer than the actual gameplay. That's to be expected, naturally, but the difference in this case is pretty major. Fortunately given the top notch voice acting and soundtrack, the audio carries over pretty perfectly to the Switch. The rockin' soundtrack still hits just as hard, and the voice acting is still just as brilliantly performed.

Image

Given the system specs on the Switch, it's really amazing that Panic Button managed to fit the whole game onto the system without cutting any content. The physical release does require a download as not all of it was fit onto the cartridge, but still, the fact of the matter is that NOTHING was stripped out. This is a fully intact port. It's just a bit blurry, but again, that's really only going to be a major thing if you're playing it docked. If you want to play on your sofa with the TV, then yeah, go PS4 or Xbox One. If you want to be able to play on the go, at work, on the toilet, so on and so forth, then the Switch is a PERFECTLY viable option. It's really quite amazing that it runs so smoothly and doesn't look worse than it does given the system that it's on, and speaking as one who's played the game on the strongest system and the weakest system currently on the market - the Xbox One X and Nintendo Switch, respectively - this is a perfectly playable version and a downright remarkable handheld version.
Exhuminator wrote:Ecchi lords must unite for great justice.

Image
User avatar
Markies
128-bit
 
Posts: 796
Joined: Fri Mar 27, 2015 4:29 pm
Location: St. Louis, Missouri

Re: Games Beaten 2018

by Markies Thu Dec 20, 2018 11:13 pm

Markies' Games Beat List Of 2018!
*Denotes Replay For Completion*

1. The Granstream Saga (PS1)
2. Perfect Dark (N64)
*3. Lunar 2: Eternal Blue Complete (PS1)*
4. Prince of Persia: Warrior Within (XBOX)
5. Donkey Kong Country (SNES)
*6. Pikmin (GCN)*
*7. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina Of Time (N64)*
8. Shining Force II (GEN)
*9. X-Men Vs. Street Fighter (PS1)*
*10. Mafia (XBOX)*
11. James Bond 007: Agent Under Fire (GCN)
12. ChuChu Rocket! (SDC)
*13. Super Metroid (SNES)*
14. Final Fantasy II (NES)
15. Devil May Cry (PS2)
16. Mega Man: The Wily Wars (GEN)
17. Secret of Evermore (SNES)
18. Test Drive: Eve of Destruction (PS2)
19. Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (GCN)
*20. Paper Mario (N64)*
21. Grandia II (SDC)
22. Ghostbusters: The Video Game (PS2)
23. Bomberman Hero (N64)
24. OutRun (GEN)
25. Dragon Warrior IV (NES)
26. Super Monkey Ball (GCN)
27. Mischief Makers (N64)
28. Dragon Valor (PS1)
*29. Beyond Good & Evil (XBX)*
30. Tokyo Xtreme Racer (SDC)
31. Black (PS2)
*32. Street Fighter II (SNES)*
33. Koudelka (PS1)
34. Bad News Baseball (NES)
35. Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (SNES)
36. Shattered Union (XBOX)
37. The Simpsons: Road Rage (PS2)
*38. Cruis'n Exotica (N64)*
39. Kid Icarus (NES)
40. The Lost Vikings (SNES)
41. Capcom Vs. SNK 2 (PS2)
42. Destroy All Humans! (XBOX)

43. Crystalis (NES)

Image

I beat Crystalis on the Nintendo Entertainment System this evening!

I didn't discover Crystalis until much later in life. It took me a long while to warm up to NES Action RPG's. They were always too difficult with their small weapons. However, once I beat Zelda II and Faxanadu, my excitement for the genre grew in leaps and bounds. One of the first ones I wanted after those two was Crystalis. So, when I was at my favorite local game store and he had a near mint copy of the game, I decided to finally pick it up. I wanted to play a shorter game before the end of the year, so I finally sat down and played through Crystalis.

In classic SNK style, the music to Crystalis is absolutely fantastic. SNK was known for their arcade hits and they always had perfect music with all of their games. There is no exception here as the upbeat music is rocking throughout the entire game. The game's visuals is also incredibly bright and colorful with a great ending screen. The dungeons all kind of look the same, but the bright colors and unique graphic effects the game puts out throughout the game is a real treat to the eyes. Thankfully, especially for an Action RPG, the combat is brilliant. Much like other NES games, you have a puny little sword. However, you can level that sword up to have an attack that looks more like a Schmup attack. And with 5 different sword types, each attack looks and feels very different.

However, enemies are immune to some attacks, so you are constantly switching between swords. Until you just give up and run through the dungeon until you get to the boss. 75% of the way through the game, I learned that. Enemies take too many hits and respawn too quickly and the constant switching of your swords caused me to just race through the dungeons and then grind outside of the dungeons. Along with a story that makes no sense and a strange stock market flow of difficulty, there are some serious issues that bog the game down.

Overall, I enjoyed my time with Crystalis. The annoying sword switching and mean enemies in dungeons aside, the game is very beatable and easy to understand. If you patient and take your time, it is fairly simple to get through. The combat is fun and you do get this sense of gaining power throughout the game which makes you feel like a hero. I can see it being mentioned in the same breath as Zelda II and Faxanadu, so if you are looking for another NES Action RPG, Crystalis is a good way to go!
Image
User avatar
MrPopo
Moderator
 
Posts: 22448
Joined: Tue Aug 26, 2008 1:01 pm
Location: Orange County, CA

Re: Games Beaten 2018

by MrPopo Fri Dec 21, 2018 12:58 am

The game's story really suffers from a bad localization. The GBC port cleans it up a bit and makes it so enemies are never immune to a sword, but then the restricted field of view ends up making it harder.
Image
Games Beaten: 2015 2016 2017 2018
Blizzard Entertainment Software Developer - All comments and views are my own and not representative of the company.
User avatar
BoneSnapDeez
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 18815
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 1:08 pm
Location: Maine

Re: Games Beaten 2018

by BoneSnapDeez Fri Dec 21, 2018 3:00 pm

1. Antarctic Adventure (Famicom)
2. Nuts & Milk (Famicom)
3. Commando (Atari 2600)
4. Binary Land (Famicom)
5. Devil World (Famicom)
6. Disney's Aladdin (SNES)
7. Popeye (NES)
8. Super Mario Land (Game Boy)
9. Ys: The Vanished Omens (Sega Master System)
10 Ys II: Ancient Ys Vanished - The Final Chapter (Famicom)
11. Final Fantasy Mystic Quest (SNES)
12. Lunar: The Silver Star (Sega CD)
13. Otenba Becky no Daibouken (MSX)
14. Metroid (Famicom Disk System)
15. Mahou Kishi Rayearth (Game Boy)
16. Wabbit (Atari 2600)
17. Kirby's Dream Land (Game Boy)
18. Warpman (Famicom)
19. Final Fantasy (NES)
20. Transformers: Convoy no Nazo (Famicom)
21. Arcade Archives: Moon Patrol (Switch eShop)
22. Gremlins (Atari 2600)
23. Arcade Archives: Ninja-Kid (Switch eShop)
24. Shining in the Darkness (Genesis)
25. Johnny Turbo's Arcade: Gate of Doom (Switch eShop)
26. Front Line (Atari 2600)
27. Donkey Kong 3 (NES)
28. Super Mario Land 2: 6 Golden Coins (Game Boy)
29. Exerion (Famicom)
30. Johnny Turbo's Arcade: Bad Dudes (Switch eShop)
31. Arcade Archives: Double Dragon (Switch eShop)
32. ACA NeoGeo: Ninja Combat (Switch eShop)
33. Johnny Turbo's Arcade: Wizard Fire (Switch eShop)
34. Super Mario Land 3: Wario Land (Game Boy)
35. Virtual Boy Wario Land (Virtual Boy)
36. Grand Master (Famicom)
37. Johnny Turbo's Arcade: Sly Spy (Switch eShop)
38. ACA NeoGeo: Top Hunter Roddy & Cathy (Switch eShop)
39. ACA NeoGeo: Shock Troopers (Switch eShop)
40. Donkey Kong Country (SNES)
41. Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (SNES)
42. Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble! (SNES)
43. Kangaroo (Atari 2600)
44. New Super Mario Bros. (DS)
45. Giana Sisters DS (DS)
46. - 52. Metal Slug Anthology (PSP)
53. Gorf (Atari 2600)
54. Phoenix (Atari 2600)
55. Mario Bros. (NES)
56. Balloon Kid (Game Boy)
57. Esper Dream (Famicom Disk System)
58. Arcade Archives: Traverse USA (Switch eShop)
59. Kouryu Densetsu Villgust (Super Famicom)
60. King Kong (Atari 2600)
61. Donkey Kong (Atari 2600)
62. Donkey Kong Junior (Atari 2600)
63. Sukeban Deka II: Shoujo Tekkamen Densetsu (Mark III)
64. The Lost Vikings (SNES)

65. Trouble Witches Origin - Episode1 Daughters of Amalgam - (Steam)
Image
I'm not intimately acquainted with the modern shmup scene, but from what I can tell the Trouble Witches "series" basically consists of a single game that's been retooled many times. First came the original doujin (Japanese indie) PC game (developed by a group called Studio SiestA), then an arcade port by Taito. Following this was a remake available on the Xbox Live Arcade store, which has since be delisted -- the perils of a digital gaming future! Now, the only practical way to experience Trouble Witches is to grab it on Steam; this particular variation is known as Trouble Witches Origin - Episode1 Daughters of Amalgam - (yes, with that punctuation and spacing, I'm just gonna call it Trouble Witches Origin). There are multiple modes of play available, though I found the first two perfectly sufficient. Arcade and Story mode are self-explanatory, with the latter simply inserting cutscenes between each level and before boss battles. The "AC" mode is, I believe, based off an older iteration of the game, while the Challenge mode is presumably for people who are actually good at shooters. There's also a nice text-based tutorial which teaches the basics of the game in about thirty seconds or so.

What first attracted me to Trouble Witches was its superficial similarities to Cave's (excellent) Deathsmiles. With original release dates of 2007, both games are horizontal bullet hell shooters starring a posse of young witch girls. Where Cave went for a darker Gothic approach, Trouble Witches is bright, bold, and incredibly silly. The character designs are flat-out ridiculous, in terms of both proportion and choice of attire, but rather pleasing to the eye. I chose to play as Pril, a blonde witch with a big floppy hat. She seems to be something of a "main character" from what I can tell. There are some DLC characters as well, including the eponymous heroine of the old Cotton series. The "story" - should you choose to view the cutscenes - is rather atrocious. The witches themselves are charming, and the (Japanese) voice-acting is superb, but the sheer amount of dialogue is comically absurd and the overall plot largely incoherent.
Image
On to the actual gameplay. Now, I'm no connoisseur of bullet hells, so I can't be entirely sure how this one holds up against its peers in terms of originality and overall quality. I will say this: what I personally experienced was quite compelling and fun. Each playable character differs slightly in terms of weaponry and speed. The witches also have their own familiars -- Pril is teamed up with a cat (who's annoyingly "sassy" in the Story mode) who provides some additional firepower. Pril's wand has autofire capabilities, but there's a catch. Defeated enemies explode into a flurry of money, which will immediately drop off-screen if the attack button continues to be held. Laying off the fire momentarily will instead cause coins to home in on Pril, and collecting said currency is absolutely essential.

Each lengthy stage contains a few shops, held in a floating pumpkin and staffed by a young gal wearing a pumpkin on her head. (If this sounds familiar, it's a clear homage to the TurboGrafx-16 cute-witch shooter Magical Chase -- check that one out if you have a few thousand dollars laying around). I generally dislike shops in my shmups, including this one, as they tend to awkwardly break up streams of frantic action. The special powers that can be obtained are pretty swell, though, including weapon upgrades, screen-clearing meteors, and life/magic increases. Anything purchased in a shop is stored as a "card" which isn't activated automatically but can be stored until a pertinent time. Like virtually all shmups, the objective of Trouble Witches Origin is to shoot (haha) for a high score. This is where the special weapons come into play. Any enemy destroyed by them will yield star coins, which are cashed in for mega-points when a stage concludes. A star coin total is stored separately from overall points, and losing a life will slice off a large percentage of total coins accumulated.

Bombs. Most shmups seem to have them. You can save 'em for the bosses or do what I do: panic fifteen seconds into stage one and commence the bombing. Trouble Witches Origin has no bombs. Instead we have something much cooler, a magical circle. This mystical device can be activated and canceled at will, lasts for a limited amount of time (MP meter), but will regenerate another charge over time. The circle serves a couple of purposes: it slows down time and sucks (most) hostile bullets into the circle's edges. If you capture enemy bullets and then shoot whatever enemy fired them, said bullets will be transformed into coins. But this carries tremendous risk. Run out of MP and the circle suddenly vanishes, which can potentially cause dozens of captured bullets to proceed in a straightforward path. Worse, if a witch captures bullets but fails to defeat the foe that fired them, the bullets will turn into yellow homing missiles. All said, the circle is a brilliant mechanic, a clever way to maximize score, and the regenerating component allows it to be utilized persistently.
Image
Game visuals are mixed. Sprites are clean and cartoony, as the stage backgrounds. Levels are a bit cliché and seemingly elemental based (ice, fire, etc.) but are generally pretty to look at. That is, until the last few stages where the developers apparently ran out of ideas. The game's concluding "temples" are undeniably dull and constructed from rote copy-paste 3D backdrops. Music is merely serviceable, and generally difficult to hear.

Bosses are huge, tough, and impressive, with their grand "introductions" perhaps the highlight of the entire Trouble Witches experience. Most can only be damaged periodically, when a specific weak point is revealed, which can occasionally drag out some fights. The trend is bucked for the final boss confrontation, which is more of an all-out bullet volley. Overall game difficulty is high but "fair" (I played on Normal mode) and the game allows for infinite continues (otherwise you wouldn't be reading this review). Of course, anyone hoping to climb those leaderboards will have to shoot for a 1CC with maximized score via clever magic circle and special weapon use. Normal enemies are typically one-shot-kills, it's the sheer number of on-screen sprites that complicates things.

I went into this one with no real expectations, but ended up enjoying myself. It's quirky, intelligent, with intuitive mechanics. A true sequel has been stuck in developmental hell for years now; hopefully it one day surfaces.
User avatar
laurenhiya21
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 1116
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 11:20 pm
Location: Wash-a-ton

Re: Games Beaten 2018

by laurenhiya21 Fri Dec 21, 2018 5:43 pm

Still catching up to reviews ha...

10/27: Blue Reflection (PS4)
As a big fan of a majority of Gust’s games, it was only a matter of time before I would get to this game. I had heard a lot of good things about this one, so I was very excited to play it. While I think this game would only appeal to a select number of people here, thankfully I was not at all disappointed!

The plot and battle systems are fairly standard for JRPGs. Bad stuff happens, high school girl has to transform into a magical girl and kick the monsters butt in a strange world via easy turn-based battles. When they aren’t dealing with monsters, they have to deal with high school drama and other minor shenanigans. While there isn’t much to the plot and battle system, the meat of the game is the relationships between the main character and her classmates. The main way you power up in Blue Reflection is spending time with your classmates, and the game heavily encourages you spending a lot of time with them and helping them out with minor tasks. In fact, at regular intervals the game will require your character to be at a certain level, which means you must interact with the classmates. If you don’t like anime visual novelly type stuff, you won’t like this one bit. However, I really like this sort of thing and I found that the characters were interesting and fun to talk to. These parts of the game were my favourite, although I certainly had fun with the battles as well (and I didn’t mind that they were simple and easy).

For some other positive things, I also really liked the visuals. The visuals aren’t probably anything special when compared to some more AAA games, but there were certain environments in the game where I consistently slowly wandered around in just to look at some more. As an example, the school hallways have this nice sunlight coming through the windows that looks super good.

The music was another thing that I really enjoyed, which was not surprising to me at all since I normally love Gust’s soundtracks. It’s definitely different from a lot of other game soundtrack I’ve heard, as it mixes a lot of more traditional sounding instruments (mostly piano and string instruments) with heavy electronic sounding bits. Some pieces have almost dubstep vibes to them? It’s really hard for me to describe, but they were still great to listen to.

As far as negative things go, other than the slow nature of a relationship focused game (which is not something I mind but I think a lot of people might not like), the big negative I can think of is that the localization is a little sloppy. There are defiantly a bunch of spelling and grammar issues here. The biggest example of this is translating the X button’s function as “Options” instead of a “Next” (in visual novel sections) or an “Accept” (in menus). I’m not really sure how that happened, but these sorts of small localization issues are all throughout Blue Reflection, and that’s a bit disappointing.

So overall, I really enjoyed Blue Reflection. I’d really recommend it to anyone who’s into more chill JRPGs and doesn’t mind some reading and high school shenanigans.
Image
Return to General Gaming

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: prfsnl_gmr and 4 guests