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REPO Man
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by REPO Man Mon Jan 22, 2018 9:37 am

Bad Dream series, but I haven't beat episode 6 yet. Also I didn't get the alternate ending for episode 3.

They're a series of freeware point-and-click adventures, albeit short ones that should take less than a half hour to complete.
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Ack
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by Ack Mon Jan 22, 2018 11:31 am

MrPopo wrote:3. Might and Magic VI - PC


Told you you'd beat it before me!

I don't mind the problems with the combat system so much, because there are a lot of ways to abuse it. You mentioned swapping to real time for strategic reasons, and depending on the situation, I'd often find I'd pop out of it to go run down a caster, hop back in long enough to beat my enemy into a pulp, and then hop out to go do it to the next. Turn-based makes you a static target for spells, which is why I prefer swapping in and out when taking on casters; it actually reminds me of tricks I'd use in M&M 3-5 to take on casters, where I'd turn around and rush them while facing away, so they didn't cast. At least I'm no longer running through dungeons backwards!
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MrPopo
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by MrPopo Mon Jan 22, 2018 1:17 pm

Yeah, I definitely was doing that rush from enemy to enemy in real time. It never stopped feeling awkward (especially near the end when some enemies had a long dash they could use as you entered turn based). Not to mention that musical sting that got old.
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Games Beaten: 2015 2016 2017 2018
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PresidentLeever
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by PresidentLeever Mon Jan 22, 2018 1:49 pm

1. Ys IV (PCE CD)
2. Exile (w/ Unworked Designs patch)(PCE CD)
3. Macross 2036 (PCE CD)
4. Sonic & All-Stars Racing Transformed (PC)

Considering how little I paid for this it was pretty awesome. Gonna try to beat the rest of the hard mode courses in career mode and get first at least once online before I move on for now.
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by nullPointer Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:28 pm

PresidentLeever wrote:4. Sonic & All-Stars Racing Transformed (PC)

Considering how little I paid for this it was pretty awesome. Gonna try to beat the rest of the hard mode courses in career mode and get first at least once online before I move on for now.

I have to say that in terms of a no-frills, gimmick free (transformation elements notwithstanding), purely kart racing experience, it's hard to top this game. On those grounds I'd even put it head to head with more recent Mario Kart entries. Sonic racing somehow manages to capture that 'old simple feeling' of earlier Mario kart games without the excessive feature set (dare I say bloat?) found in some of the modern Mario Kart titles.
Last edited by nullPointer on Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by isiolia Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:36 pm

nullPointer wrote:I have to say that in terms of a no-frills, gimmick free (transformation elements notwithstanding), purely kart racing experience, it's hard to top this game. On those grounds I'd even put it head to head with more recent Mario Kart entries. Sonic racing somehow manages to capture that 'old simple feeling' of earlier Mario kart games without the excessive feature set (dare I say bloat?) found some of the modern Mario Kart titles.


For the game as a whole, at least with regard to Racing Transformed (I haven't played the first one), I'd say it's the opposite. Mostly because the Sonic game has several different track types, and the transformations change up the controls a fair bit. Relative to that, MK8 is pretty straightfoward. Maybe a few too many customization options and powerups, but, racing itself is still pretty similar.
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by PresidentLeever Tue Jan 23, 2018 1:23 am

Never played any MK's past the gamecube one actually, guess I should fix that.
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by ElkinFencer10 Tue Jan 23, 2018 9:46 am

Games Beaten in 2018 So Far - 8
* denotes a replay

January (8 Games Beaten)
1. Phantasy Star Portable - PlayStation Portable - January 1
2. Middle-Earth: Shadow of War - Xbox One - January 9
3. Duck Tales - NES - January 10
4. Yakuza Kiwami - PlayStation 4 - January 14
5. Xuan-Yuan Sword: The Gate of Firmament - PlayStation 4 - January 20
6. Doki Doki Literature Club - Steam - January 20
7. Deep Space Waifu - Steam - January 21
8. Turok: Dinosaur Hunter - Steam - January 21


8. Turok: Dinosaur Hunter - Steam - January 21

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Back when Turok was first released 20 years ago (Jesus Christ, I'm getting old), I didn't have much opportunity to play it. I was, after all, but a child - kindergarten or first grade, if memory serves - and my mother wasn't too keen on letting me play M rated games in high school let alone when I still had all my baby teeth. I did get a couple opportunities here and there to play bits and pieces of it at friends' houses, and I was always enamored by it; a lone man in (what at the time was) an incredibly realistic looking world filled with dinosaurs and gun toting enemies. Despite my fascination with the game, I never owned it, so I never got to play more than a little bit of it. Then this remaster pops up on Steam, and I end up with it in my library. I don't remember how (seriously, I have over 700 games installed on my PC, and I have no idea where half of them came from), but there it was, so I finally sat down and played it.

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Even in this remaster, you can tell that visuals are those of a game that's old enough to drink and have a Bachelor's degree. They's increased the draw distance, spruced up some effects, and cleaned up the models, but at the end of the day, it's still a remaster of a (by modern standards) extremely primitive 3D game rather than a full remake. If you're familiar with the visuals of the original release, however, then it's still an impressive upgrade nonetheless. The game definitely feels its age when playing as well; this is very much a first person shooter from that rather awkward time period where FPS games were every bit as labyrinthine as a third person action game, and as a result, the challenge is often as much finding your way to the objectives and the exit of each level as the enemies you'll encounter. Whether that's a good thing or a bad thing is a matter of personal preference; I, personally, like a bit of exploration as opposed to the hyper-linear shooters that you see in recent years (especially on PS3 and 360), but Turok is a tad too cryptic for me in the later levels.

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The plot is definitely the game's weak link simply because there's barely one. You play as a time traveling Native American man whose ​duty it is to maintain the boundary between Earth and the "Lost Land," a realm where time has no meaning and enemies range from dinosaurs and spear wielding tribesman to giant robots and aliens with lasers. There's this one bad hombre who's trying to assemble some super weapon to break down that barrier and destroy everything in existence, and you've got to go kill dinosaurs and aliens and stuff to stop him. That's it. That's the whole plot. At least all I could figure out. Not bad, per se, but extremely bare bones.

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Turok is an enjoyable experience, but even with a modern HD remaster, it shows its age, and it frankly hasn't aged particularly well. The game mechanics, level design, and visuals (even with the remaster's fresh coat of paint) all belie the fact that the game is, at the end of the day, from 1996. It's certainly not a bad game, and I had a lot of fun throughout most of my playthrough, but it's not a game that feels at all modernized, and younger gamers probably won't appreciate it the way those of us in our late 20s or early 30s will.
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by dunpeal2064 Tue Jan 23, 2018 10:10 am

1. The Last of Us (+ Left Behind DLC)
2. Limbo
3. Uncharted: Drake's Fortune
4. Uncharted 2: Among Thieves
5. Bioshock
6. Inside


I've been playing too many games! I'll spoiler the write-ups here, hopefully I can stay caught up after this.

The Last of Us

The Last of Us

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The Last of Us was the first game I beat in 2018, and the most modern game I have finished in a long while. Its a game I often see the highest of praise for. Before playing TLOU, I had never played what I would call a modern Naughty Dog game. Basically, I had not played the Uncharted games or this game. While all of these games had some appeal, TLOU was the most interesting to me, as I'd heard it was much more serious and feelsy.

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The setup for The Last of Us is pretty standard. There is an infection going around, and the world has gone to shit. Your main characters, Joel and Ellie, have to survive in this shitty world. As an overarching plot (Granted, with much more nuance, but I'd rather avoid spoilers), it is very simple, but this gives room for detail in character story and growth, which is where I think TLOU's storytelling shines. Its not the "zombie" apocalypse that is interesting, its Joel, Ellie, and the characters you meet along the way. The writing and voice acting here are wonderful, some of the best I have ever seen in a video game, and the game's pace plays wonderfully between relaxed, beautiful scenery with lovely, light and soft dialogue between characters, and suddenly anxious, high tension, stressful moments.

TLOU's gameplay will likely feel familiar to anyone that has played, or even seen, Uncharted. Its hard not to compare the two, as they both seemingly use the same core engine for their games. However, TLOU does away with the over-the-top parkour platforming and crazy gun battles. Instead, TLOU offers a much more subtle, grounded approach to the engine, with a big emphasis on stealth and resource management. TLOU is a much slower moving and deliberate game. Luckily, the cinematic gameplay design of Uncharted translates perfectly here, trading bravado and 80s action for survivalist, often horror-driven moments.

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Outside of combat, you'll be exploring a beautifully-connected linear world, looking for resources to both keep your stock high, and to allow you to craft some useful items, like knives to improve stealth combat, melee weapon augments, health kits, and molotovs. The crafting system here is very basic, which has the benefit of being user-friendly and not taking away from the pace of the game, but does leave something to be desired, as you'll likely have fully explored the crafting of the game long before its over. I also regularly found myself to be in full stock of craftables, as the max you can carry is low (Rightly, to avoid over-stocking and taking away any worry of survival), but thorough exploration rewarded more crafting items than I could use. While not a perfect system, I think it does its job well enough here.

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On top of exploration, you'll also be solving puzzles throughout your adventure, either to help you move forward, or to open a path for Ellie, who often can't explore to the same lengths Joel can. While these puzzles are very simple, they do their job well, and allow more time for Joel and Ellie to chit chat. I would have personally liked a little more complexity here, but it makes sense in context to keep them brief, as puzzling, like gunning, isn't the main goal of the game. Sadly, in order to be sure a good pace is being kept, TLOU has a tendancy to give the player a very short amount of time to figure things out, before another character will chime in and begin giving you hints. While I think this approach feels more natural than Uncharted's Hint prompts, it has the downside of no longer being optional, so unless you are quick, the puzzles will often just be solved for you.

The Last of Us is a game that, when its good, is very very good. I love the feelsy stuff, the really cruel shit that makes you yell at the devs. I love fighting the infected, and trying to work out optimal ways to approach different packs. I love that you can stealth through a lot of the game, or you can rambo shit down. I was less excited about fighting regular humans so constantly, or about the fairly simple puzzles, and wish more time could have been given to infected encounters (More than 4 types of infected would have been cool), and messed up moments. That said, I don't think I would change a thing about The Last of Us. Its clear that everything here is intentional and serves a purpose, and I find myself nitpicking not due to disappointment, but moreso due to how much I enjoyed my favorite parts, and wishing I could have had more.

I'd give The Last of Us a... 8.8-9.2/10 range. Its real good, so good that I, for the first time in my life, played DLC to a game, and did so immediately after the credits rolled. I then went and bought the Uncharted Collection in hopes to find a bit more goodness like this.

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Mini DLC review - Super good. Switches between a small group of really great encounters that introduce a new idea to combat, and a very relaxed time spent between Ellie and her friend that will definitely put a smile on your face. The Pun Book alone makes it worth the play, let alone the excellent encounters.


Limbo


Limbo


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I picked up Limbo (Along with Inside, since the physical release comes with both) on a whim. I had tried to get through Limbo in the past, but got stuck very early on. I bought this pack mostly for Inside, a game I've recently been hearing a lot about, but decided to right the wrong of past me and finish Limbo first.

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Limbo is a 2D side-scrolling puzzle game. While at a glance it may appear to be a platformer, almost everything you do in the game that isn't running to the right could be described as puzzle solving. It marries this with a very minimalist approach atmospherically, with the game taking place entirely in the shadows, and sound design focusing more on what isn't there than what is.

Two things stood out to me while playing Limbo. One, the way they designed a 2D scrolling puzzle game is very interesting. The pace is very controlled, and allows for some very close calls with enemies that might not be possible in more traditional examples of the genre. "Cinematic" comes to mind, though its not exactly that. I suppose its linear approach and slower character and general movement allows for them to use these set pieces, knowing how the limited player character will likely respond. It creates some very neat moments, where you feel like you just barely made it out unscathed.

Two, the puzzles here are damn nice. They are extremely well balanced, often stumping me just long enough to make me feel great for solving them. There are no hints, no glowing items, no arrows telling you where to go, which creates this very organic feeling when solving. I also enjoyed how every puzzle was very self-contained. You never had to run back to another area or bring something with you to solve a puzzle, they are all self-contained, almost like a single-screen puzzle game. And, since the player character has such limited controls (Move and interact, basically), you always at least know what you should be trying.

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I enjoyed my time with Limbo. I think it was just about the right length, clocking in just under 3 hours. its a simplistic game through and through, but it accomplishes what it sets out to. It never really blew me away, but I never felt bored either.

I'd put Limbo at a... 7.2-7.5/10 range. Its well-designed and fun. It never reaches any sort of monumental high, but its not trying to. It borders on being artsy for the sake of it, at least to me, but it works for the game well enough. I'll likely not revisit it, but I'm glad I took the 3 hours to sit down with it.


Uncharted: Drake's Fortune

Uncharted: Drake's Fortune


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The Uncharted series is one I've always been hesitantly curious about, due to its perfect storm of wild praise coupled with design choices that I usually steer clear of (QTE's, "Cinematic Gameplay" etc). Its one of those things I felt likely to dislike, but needed to experience for myself.

Uncharted: Drake's Fortune is, for all intense and purposes, an Indiana Jones video game. You play as Nathan Drake, a light-hearted, witty thief/treasure hunter, and your goal is to both prove that you are the descendant of the legendary thief Sir Francis Drake, and find said legendary thief's fortune. You are accompanied by your thief mentor, and a reporter-turned-love-interest that is trying to spin a story out of your adventures. While the premise is fairly standard, the writing and voice acting add a lot, and do a great job at selling Uncharted as a light, fun 80s action romp. Thankfully, this simple premise also allows the gameplay to take main stage.

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Uncharted: Drake's Fortune is, essentially, a 3rd person shooter/parkour platformer hybrid, with a healthy side of puzzle solving. You'll spend the majority of the game shooting dudes, climbing increasingly ridiculous structures, and pushing blocks/levers about to progress. The gun play here is pretty standard, with your usual helping of weapon choices. Ammo is on the lighter side, but for the most part is sufficient enough to blast through without concern. The game uses a cover system, which (mostly) works well, and allows Drake to avoid taking damage. To further encourage making use of the cover system, Drake is very squishy and dies rather fast, but has constantly regenerating health. While this initially comes off as too easy, the combat encounters do ramp up as the game progresses, and end up providing enough tension to keep things interesting. I'd say the game even gets somewhat difficult as it reaches its finale, but the very generous checkpoint system means you'll never be set back far even if you fail, allowing the player to more fully explore and experiment each encounter.

The platforming in Uncharted is... strange. Basically, you climb and jump all over everything, from window ledges to gutter pipes to street signs. However, where you go and what you do is very predetermined. In the vast majority of platforming sections, you'll find yourself on the ground needing to get past a road block, only to conveniently discover some (clearly defined) ledges that look climbable. You'll jump up and grab, and then press "X" to jump to the next ledge. While the presentation of these events can look visually exciting (Sometimes stuff breaks while you climb it), these segments of the game are practically played for you. Its not quite QTE's, as you do maintain control of Drake, but its not far off. This is the part of Uncharted that caused me some hesitancy, as on paper this sounds awful. In execution, its... okay. Yes, the game almost plays itself during these parts, and yes, the almost complete lack of potential for failure, or room for personal creativity in how you approach these sections, is disappointing. However, rather than being upset, I found myself rather relaxed during these segments, enjoying the ridiculous climbs Drake would go on, and while I never felt tension for fear of failure, there was still a very movie-like tension in just watching things unfold. While it'll never be my preference, I do think there is some merit to taking away control in order to present things in a much more controlled and digestible manner.

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When you aren't blasting baddies or shuffling across scaffolding, you'll be solving puzzles! The puzzles here are fairly simple for the most part, generally involving some block pushing or pulling to proceed past a road block, though they occasionally lean closer to more typing Indiana Jones fair, consulting a journal to figure out some ancient booby trap or puzzle. The puzzles never reach a very high difficulty, but about half the time will at least have you feeling pleased with yourself for solving them. If, however, you do get stuck, you'll be offered a "Hint" (Which is usually just the solution) if you take too long... or within a few seconds of entering the room with the puzzle in it. While the Hints are always optional, it does get frustrating seeing the Hint pop up so quickly, as if the game is trying to hurry you through things. that gripe aside, though, I think the puzzles here are well-done. What the lack in challenge, I feel, they make up for in their construction and, when it comes to deciphering older puzzles, intrigue. Again, a move that leans more towards movie-good, game-sufficient.

Overall, I enjoyed my time with Uncharted: Drake's Fortune, and I can certainly see why this series is so popular. This is the summer blockbuster of games, a fun romp, a "turn off your brain" sort of ride. Its structure is very much focused on making a cinematic experience, keeping a constant game flow, always moving you along, and in doing so it is able to present a nice, compact little adventure. Its lacking in some places, and never really goes anywhere beyond its initial theme. It has a premise of a movie but is about 3 times as long, making its simple approach a little stale by the end. But, it was fun. I had fun jumping around and climbing on things, I had fun shooting dudes, and I had fun just being in that world.

I'd give Uncharted: Drake's Fortune a... 6.8-7.0/10.0. Somewhere in there feels right. Fun enough for a playthrough, not likely to return to it, but had enough of a good time that I'll continue with the series


Uncharted 2: Among Thieves

Uncharted 2: Among Thieves

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Uncharted 2: Among Thieves, from what I have seen, seems to be the most praised of the Uncharted games. When I bought the Uncharted Collection, it was mostly for this game. I knew that, regardless of how I felt about the first game, I would be playing this after.

Uncharted 2 is similar to its predecessor in many ways. This is still "Indiana Jones the Video Game", still primarily features gun combat, parkour platforming, and light puzzle solving. Its still predominantly cinematic, and streamlines its content to fit the way it wants to present itself. It is still very movie-esk, in fact moreso here than in the first game.

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However, Uncharted 2 sets itself apart in a few ways. Firstly, everything it is doing from the first game, it does better. The voice acting and writing are better, the plot and pace are drastically improved, the cinematic gameplay and set pieces are better, the combat and general game engine feel improved, the game looks better, the enemy variety is better (including some almost boss fights!), the locals and npcs are more interesting... just about everything here has been greatly improved upon. Its clear that Naughty Dog took a deep look into what actually made Uncharted good, and pushed those aspects of the game hard.

On top of just one-upping themselves, Uncharted 2 is also a much more serious game. Thats not to say that the characters have changed, as Drake is still light-hearted and full of wit. The predicaments that the characters are placed in, however, are much more dire, and Drake goes from unstoppable suave hero of the first game, to absolute ragdoll in the sequel. Its almost silly how much Drake gets the crap beat out of him. While the immediate appeal of nail-biting escapes is apparent, I think this has a subtle effect too, of pushing the sort of set pieces Uncharted has even further into movie territory. Drake feels very much like a movie protagonist, and I often found myself similarly questioning how he was still able to continue, a question that doesn't come to mind no matter how beat up I am in other games.

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Uncharted 2 is not a complete overhaul, but moreso a subtle adjusting towards what I assume Naughty Dog thought Uncharted should really be, and it works. While the changes are minor on paper, in practice Uncharted 2 is a huge improvement over its predecessor. While the first game was a "fun watch" sort of affair, Uncharted 2 left me wanting more. This is the sort of game that creates a franchise, and I think Uncharted 2 is deserving of its praise.

I'd give Uncharted 2 a... 8.2/10. A huge improvement over the first, while still maintaining the core concepts that made the first game fun. Where the first left me somewhat curious to check the sequels, this game made playing the rest of the series mandatory. While I doubt I'll ever prefer these sorts of games to more traditional, gameplay-focused games, I've been pleasantly surprised by how much I have enjoyed them. I know games like these tend to get bashed on for barely being games, and if you are craving some twitch play I'd not turn here, but I think these games certainly have their place, and do what they set out to do very well.


Bioshock

Bioshock

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Bioshock is another one of those series I was always distantly curious about. From what I had seen, I knew the setting/atmosphere were appealing, but for a long time I avoided both modern gaming and First=Person games. Better late than never, though!

Bioshock is a tough game to describe. Its a Sci-Fi game, but not of the futuristic type. Instead, the game takes place in Rapture, an underwater civilization that exists in what appears to be a normal, every day Earth, only in secret to avoid disruption to their ways of life from the outside. The tone here is very unique, and even only experiencing the game for the first time now, felt very "Bioshock". The odd mixture of old-timey music and worn-down radios within a very steampunk-esk underwater world creates a very certain feel, that I knew was a Bioshock thing before even playing it. The story from there gets all sorts of crazy, but is best experienced first-hand.

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Bioshock's gameplay is rather interesting. It is an FPS primarily, but it sets itself apart in a few ways. You have your usual weaponry, ranging from pistols to grenade launchers, which you wield with your right hand. Your left hand is reserved to, essentially, cast spells. You have a decent variety of spells, but instead of just being another way to dish out damage, spells are reserved more for effects. You can use electricity to stun enemies, fire to slowly damage them over time, or ice to freeze them in place temporarily. You can distract enemies, enrage enemies, and even turn some enemies to fight for you! While you are augmenting the battle with spells, your guns will do the big damage, and thankfully Bioshock makes this interesting too. Each gun will act as expected, but can also be loaded with special ammo. These range from armor piercing to explosive, from electric ammo to heat-seeking rockets. In addition to the various ways you can approach combat, you also have various passive abilities you can equip, that augment various things. Some may increase certain elemental damage, or allow you to heal faster, or improve your hacking skills. The diversity here is great, and gives a near-RPG feel to Bioshock, as its unlikely two players will approach the game in the same way.

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In between the very frequent combat encounters, you'll have some time to explore. Usually, this means hacking various things via a pipe maze mini game, in order to get discounts at vendors or to get into safes for loot. This also gives you time to accumulate some resources, as things like ammo and health kits, while not scarce, are used up quickly, and thus always needed. Bioshock does not have a cover system, shield, or regenerating health. Your character dies quickly, and unless you have med kits on hand, you'll likely get killed a few times. Luckily, the game is fairly generous with how it handles player death, as you simply respawn at the last "Vita Chamber", or checkpoint, you passed, with the game world left in tact since you died. This means you can die half way through killing something, and when you return they will still be half way dead. However, you do respawn with half health and are not given any med kits upon death, so while forgiving, the system is not very abuse-able. If you are out of resources, dying won't do any good.

The other thing you'll be doing during this downtime is hunting down Big Daddy/Little Sister combos, so that you can kill the Big Daddy and harvest/rescue the Little Sisters, which award you Adam, a currency that allows you to buy your augments. Harvesting them kills them, but rewards more Adam, while rescuing them makes their care person happy, which prompts her to occasionally reward you (I rescued them) This is the only way to, essentially, level up your character. Big Daddys were, for me, consistently the most challenging thing in the game. They have a ton of health, and while always killable, eat up a ton of resources in the process. This makes both choosing to harvest/rescue interesting, as well as how you spend your Adam, as it is such a limited resource.

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Its funny how your expectations of a game can differ so wildly from what a game really is. I had always taken Bioshock for a Fallout-esk Sci-Fi FPS RPG with a big focus on story and setting. I was surprised at just how gameplay-focused Bioshock is, and how it sits much closer to a traditional FPS with constant combat encounters than a dialogue-heavy RPG. I was also surprised at how difficult I found this game to be. While never hair-rippingly frustrating, the game often ran me dry of ammo/health, and I regularly found myself re-equipping things to suit what I had in stock, constantly hacking things even to save a few bucks at a vendor, and ravaging areas for any resources I could gather. And even in its more gameplay-focused direction, it still managed to throw some story stuff in that genuinely surprised and delighted me. Its not perfect, as its upgrade system is a little light and generic, and for its 12 hours of length only a couple of story points even happen at all. However, Bioshock is just a consistently-good game. The world, lore, and atmosphere are solid throughout, the gameplay delivers throughout, and the game keeps a great pace and brings everything home well before concerns of overstaying its welcome could set in.

I'd give Bioshock a 7.5-7.8/10.0. Lots of great combat, a good amount of customization, and a cool world with a story that only delivers occasionally, but delivers well. Will definitely play more of the series, and might even play this one again in the future.


Inside

Inside

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I've been excited to play this game for a few months now. My favorite Youtuber (NakeyJakey) has mentioned it a couple of times, and tends to have impeccable taste, so that sparked my interest. I then realized that I knew literally nothing about the game, other than that it was made by the same people that made Limbo. I didn't even know what genre it was! This excited me even more, as its so rare for me to go into a game completely blind. Not that it benefits this game in particular, its just something extra that I don't get to experience as often.

Inside is, as it turns out, very similar to Limbo. Its a 2D scrolling puzzle game, with a large focus on its vibe and atmosphere.

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While this game could likely still be filed under "Minimalist", it does a lot more than Limbo with its presentation. You see, Inside, while technically a 2D game, blends its backgrounds and foregrounds together so seamlessly that, if you are like me, you'll often find yourself trying to walk up or down, even after you are a decent ways into the game. Its not just a visual trick, either, as everything other than your main character can move about the screen in three dimensions. So, if an enemy in the background sees you, it will run up the screen towards you, even though you are locked to a 2D plane. its hard to do it justice in words, or even in still images, but I was really taken aback at how wonderful this visual direction was. I've never quite seen a 2D game like Inside.

The gameplay, while also similar to Limbo, also takes some strides to push its formula further. It remains simple, and keeps up the focus on single-section puzzling via a character with very limited controls. However, where Limbo takes this concept and consistently applies it, Inside takes it and runs, pushing the boundaries of what you expect to have to do with your character. You'll play for a bit and think you have an idea of how things will play out, but the game does a great job of subverting your expectations.

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There is really something special about Inside. The way the player progresses through an unpredictable world, through unpredictable puzzles, in such a dark, monotone, yet beautiful world. The way it breaks the boundaries of 2D, breaks the expectations of the player, and yet remains true to its core, simple ideals.

I'd put Inside around a... 8.9-9.2 range. It not only did what it set out to do perfectly, but what it set out to do in the first place was beautiful, weird, and completely unexpected. Its rare that a game literally makes my jaw drop, but Inside did so without appearing to even try! I really love when a game does something truly beautiful, but doesn't parade about it, but rather lets it pass as if it carries weight similar to the rest of the experience. This, to me, is art, and it is so without coming off as "trying to be artsy" or whatever. I loved Inside, and think anyone who is even remotely curious should sit down with it.


Phew! That was a lot of writing. I don't expect anyone to be crazy enough to read all that nonsense, but I do want to keep up with my writing and games beaten this year, and I knew I was already getting too far behind. I need to either write more frequently, or play longer games. :lol:
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ElkinFencer10
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Re: Games Beaten 2018

by ElkinFencer10 Tue Jan 23, 2018 11:12 am

Did you play The Last of Us on PS3 or PS4? Having played through on both platforms, the game's feel DEFINITELY benefits from running 1080p60 on PS4 as opposed to the 720p30 on PS3.
Exhuminator wrote:Ecchi lords must unite for great justice.

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