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Re: Games Beaten 2017

Posted: Mon Feb 06, 2017 12:42 am
by Exhuminator
PartridgeSenpai wrote:At first I felt so scorned that I was left out of this praise

I for one enjoy your reviews. I enjoy nearly everybody's reviews. I don't always post feedback about someone's review, unless I have a very specific thing to say, or if I have a question. I also don't expect any praise when I myself put up multi-paragraph reviews with screenshots and cover art. This whole thread being a communal labor of love after all. But if somebody learns something about a game I beat, and comes away a little more informed, effort well spent.

Re: Games Beaten 2017

Posted: Mon Feb 06, 2017 5:48 am
by alienjesus
Yeah, you guys should all know that even when I don't comment, or even if I have no interest in the game you guys are writing about, I always read the full review.

And I always click back a page before leaving to make sure that I see any posts I might have missed too :lol:

Re: Games Beaten 2017

Posted: Mon Feb 06, 2017 8:41 am
by ElkinFencer10
alienjesus wrote:Yeah, you guys should all know that even when I don't comment, or even if I have no interest in the game you guys are writing about, I always read the full review.

And I always click back a page before leaving to make sure that I see any posts I might have missed too :lol:

Same. I very rarely comment, but I always read.

Re: Games Beaten 2017

Posted: Mon Feb 06, 2017 8:47 am
by PartridgeSenpai
Exhuminator wrote:
PartridgeSenpai wrote:At first I felt so scorned that I was left out of this praise

I for one enjoy your reviews. I enjoy nearly everybody's reviews. I don't always post feedback about someone's review, unless I have a very specific thing to say, or if I have a question. I also don't expect any praise when I myself put up multi-paragraph reviews with screenshots and cover art. This whole thread being a communal labor of love after all. But if somebody learns something about a game I beat, and comes away a little more informed, effort well spent.


Same to you! I always love reading your stuff, especially because you play lots of games that I don't, and have a very entertaining way of writing :)

This is by far the thread I read the most, so I always read all the new posts. And I will also say that even though I don't always post, I still enjoy reading them. :D

Re: Games Beaten 2017

Posted: Mon Feb 06, 2017 9:55 am
by Exhuminator
alienjesus wrote:And I always click back a page before leaving to make sure that I see any posts I might have missed too

I do this with every RB thread I read. I kind of figured this is what everybody else does too? I mean if someone doesn't, they're actively choosing to miss swaths of fresh content.

Re: Games Beaten 2017

Posted: Mon Feb 06, 2017 9:59 am
by alienjesus
Exhuminator wrote:
alienjesus wrote:And I always click back a page before leaving to make sure that I see any posts I might have missed too

I do this with every RB thread I read. I kind of figured this is what everybody else does too? I mean if someone doesn't, they're actively choosing to miss swaths of fresh content.


Yeah, me too. But I've noticed that if a question gets asked at the end of a page, it's often unanswered, so yeah, I guess not everyone does.

Re: Games Beaten 2017

Posted: Mon Feb 06, 2017 11:53 am
by prfsnl_gmr
Exhuminator wrote:
alienjesus wrote:And I always click back a page before leaving to make sure that I see any posts I might have missed too

I do this with every RB thread I read. I kind of figured this is what everybody else does too? I mean if someone doesn't, they're actively choosing to miss swaths of fresh content.


+1

I always click back to read reviews. I appreciate them tremendously, even if I do not comment on them, and people like Bone, Elkin, Exhuminator, and Partridge have really stepped it up this year. (I am sure I am missing some people, but I think that this thead has been really, really good this year.)

Re: Games Beaten 2017

Posted: Mon Feb 06, 2017 11:56 am
by MrPopo
Exhuminator wrote:
alienjesus wrote:And I always click back a page before leaving to make sure that I see any posts I might have missed too

I do this with every RB thread I read. I kind of figured this is what everybody else does too? I mean if someone doesn't, they're actively choosing to miss swaths of fresh content.

I use the button that takes me to the first unread post.

Re: Games Beaten 2017

Posted: Mon Feb 06, 2017 12:31 pm
by alienjesus
1. 3D Power Drift 3DS
2. Maze Hunter 3-D 3DS
3. Hyrule Warriors Legends 3DS
4. Icarus Proudbottom's World of Typing Weekly PC
5. Paper Mario N64
6. Catherine PS3
7. Glover N64 *NEW*

Glover

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I'm a big fan of 5th gen gaming. In the eyes of many retro gamers, it's the generation that's aged the worst, with many citing ugly graphics, poor controls and clunky cameras as being reasons they just don't like the early days of 3D any more. Well, personally, I don't find those issues to be that major in most of the defining games of the era. Mario 64, Rayman 2, Banjo-Kazooie, Night into Dreams, Crash Bandicoot - honestly I find all of those games have their flaws, but ultimately they still generall control well, look quite nice and I enjoy playing them a lot. 5th gen hasn't aged nearly as badly as people say.

Maybe those people who dislike the 5th gen of gaming have played Glover recently though.

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Glover is a 3D platformer, the de facto genre of gen 5. You play as an anthropomorphic magic glove. The story goes that there is a kingdom protected by the 7 magic stones which adorn it's castle. A wizard in the castle is brewing a potion, but something goes wrong and it explodes. The wizard is turned to stone, his magic gloves go flying off, the magic stones fall off the castle, and one of the gloves falls in the potion and turns evil. The nice glove casts a spell on the magic stones to turn them into rubber balls and stop them smashing on the ground, and then has to gather them all to return the land to peace, whilst saving the wizard and defeating the evil glove in the process.

Glover takes place over 6 worlds with 3 levels and a boss fight a piece. There's also a bonus level in each world that requires you to gather all the 'caribs' in each level of the world to unlock - they're basically this game's equivalent of coins or rings. In each main stage you must roll your ball past the obstacles of the level to the exit, solving puzzles and passing challenges along the way whilst keeping both yourself and the ball intact.

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The controls for manipulating the ball are quite intricate. You can roll it, bounce it, slap it at a low angle along the ground, throw it forwards, lob it upwards, bounce on top of it, walk on it to roll it across water, and transform it into different types of ball. The basic ball is a rubber ball which is bouncy and light. It floats on water, bounces after a drop, can be bounced to reach higher ledges, and is fairly easy to control over light ground. You'll use it 90% of the time. You can also transform it into a bowling ball, which can be slapped into obstacles or enemies to damage them and sinks underwater, but is hard to control, and very heavy to push up slopes. A third form is a ball bearing, which is easy to control and sinks underwater too, but doesn't bounce and can't smash obstacles. The final form is the magic gem, which doubles points obtained when grabbing caribs, but smashes in a single hit, or after dropping off a ledge. This form is worthless and shouldn't be an option.



The problem with the intricacy of Glover's controls are the button mappings. Every button does a ton of different things and not always with consistent results. For example, A is jump normally, but when rolling the ball, A will lob it upwards. Unless you hold A, in which case it will slap it across the ground. How do you jump with the ball? B, which bounces the ball. Unless you hold it, in which case it throws the ball. If you hold B off of the ball, Glover will point to where the ball is so you can find it. Z lets go of the ball if you're rolling it, lies down to dodges explosive blasts if you are still and off the ball, cartwheels through small gaps if you#re running and off the ball, and ground pounds in midair. R changes your balls forms if you're on the ball, but shoots spells if you have one and you're off the ball. If you're off the ball you can change the ball form by holding B and pressing R. If you jump on the ball, you'll grab it and roll it as usual, but if you double jump on the ball, you'll stand on top of it and roll it, but your controls are reversed. Ground pounding the ball will knock it flying, but standing on the ball and THEN ground pounding will give you a big bounce to get to higher ground... and godammit, it's complicated. The ground pound thing cost me a ton of deaths especially. You get my point right? The controls are intricate, but they don't feel natural. Some decisions are particularly bizarre, like switching the 'jump' button when you grab the ball. It makes it so that sometimes obstacles become more complicated than they should be because you're fighting to get the controls to do the simple action you want them to.

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Glover does have some fun level design ideas. The worlds are all generic platformer themes, although they go with some slightly less basic ideas (there's no 'ice', 'forest' and 'lava', but instead 'atlantis', 'pirate', 'circus', 'castle', 'prehistoric' and 'space'). The obstacles they used are often inventive and fun, and there are some clever ideas about how to use the ball mechanics. I loved the ice level where the ball would build into a snowball as you rolled it. Glover can sometimes grab potions which give him powers - some make him huge and powerful, one allows him to run super fast, some let him shoot spells to turn enemies into frogs, one makes him turn into a helicopter, and one turns the ball into a giant, super bouncy beach ball. When the game lets you use this stuff, it's great, but sadly somewhat underutlised.

The problem with Glover is that despite some good level design, the controls just aren't suited for it. You'll lose the ball in stupid ways a lot of time, and sometimes it feels unfair. Check points are often before difficult segments, which seems nice until you clear that segment and die again, making you have to do the whole thing again. Enemies are universally awful, with many being invincible, and a lot of them attacking the ball rather than you and knocking it flying. I found I tended to stun the enemy and then push them off the cliff into a bottomless pit, as it was normally the only realistic way to proceed.

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Glover also has some issues with a lack of polish. Enemies continue to attack you whilst cutscenes play for example, and I've had issues where the ball has gotten stuck or similar whilst playing. Some level mechanics seem to have been designed in a way that requires perfect positioning, but don't justify it - it's not challenging, it just feels liuke the level needed more playtesting.

Graphically, Glover is underwhelming. It looks a lot like an early PS1 game in terms of it's low poly count, and the N64 (and the PS1 for that matter) could definitely do a lot better. The N64 fog is real, especially on the hub world, so don't be fooled by all these emulated screenshots I've nicked from the internet - it certainly won't look that clean unless you're playing on one of those Ultra HDMI modded N64s. It's music is solid though, if not especially memorable. It's catchy enough that you'll hum along as you play, but a day after finishing it I'm struggling to remember any tunes.

Glover is a mediocre game that constantly feels like it should have been a good one. Unfortunately, the over complex controls just don't marry up with the level design in a way that makes the experience fun. Instead, it's just a source of frequent frustration, and despite it's scant 5 hours or so running time, I was glad to be done with this one. I'd skip it.

Re: Games Beaten 2017

Posted: Mon Feb 06, 2017 1:05 pm
by Ack
1. Warhammer: End Times - Vermintide (PC)(Action)
2. Ultimate Mortal Kombat 3 (SNES)(Fighting)
3. DRAGON: The Bruce Lee Story (SNES)(Fighting)

I watched the Super Bowl up until the end of the fourth quarter and then decided I'd go vent by beating a game largely considered impossible on some corners of the Internet.

Seriously:

GameFAQS guide wrote:The phantom(last boss, impossible?)

GameFAQS forum wrote:Is there a way to beat this game its been 13 years since I bought this game and I just recently dug it out got to the Phantom and I still cant beat him is he Invincible or something? Do you have to die against him? I mean I know he dies in the end but there could atleast be a cut scene where he thinks he won,
then the Phantom comes back to life to finish him off I mean. I think it's stupid if this game has no ending or if the ending is that you cant win.

ars technica forum wrote:So, I fired up my friend's old SNES and played this game to the very end, I got the demon's health bar all the way down to zero but it still wouldn't die. Is this what the programmers intended? It seems absurd to have different endings for the movie and the game, but even more absurd to have a game you can't win. Anybody know anything about this? Searches on google turned up not much.


Yeah, it's possible to beat it. It just isn't fun.

Anyway, DRAGON: The Bruce Lee Story is a fighting game based the 1993 movie of the same name, a biographical drama about Bruce Lee's life from a teenager in Hong Kong to the set of Enter the Dragon, along with a recurring nightmare of a phantom that repeatedly haunts him. While it tries to adhere to the movie, there are of course some liberties added to include additional content in the game. Unfortunately however the game offers a challenge that too often relies on cheap tricks, poor controls, and aggravating required special moves to win.

First, this is one of those fighting games that requires you play on at least Normal difficulty to see the ending. Trying out lower difficulties will stop the game early in the run and suggest a higher difficulty. You also have three "lives" with which to beat the game, though running out is not an automatic game over; instead you fight the phantasmal representation of Death. Beat Death, and you get all of your lives back and can continue where you left off, though considering Death is pretty much the final boss, don't expect to win. It's probably the highlight of the game and one mark that it's not completely devoid of creativity, it just doesn't implement that creativity well.

Second, during the course of fighting you will build up a chi meter, which will allow you access to two alternate fighting stances for Bruce Lee: "fighter" stance and "nunchaku" stance. Fighter stance changes out many of the moves and allows for rapid fire punches and kicks, though it suffers heavily from the startup attacks required to get off his quick punches and kicks; you'll more than likely knock an enemy to the ground before you ever get to fire any of them off, or worse, the AI will simply duck and sweep you. Because of this oversight and the loss of certain moves, "fighter" stance ends up losing most of its usefulness. And since chi is a precious resource that is necessary for the absurdly powerful "nunchaku" stance, there's little reason to really use "fighter" stance. As for "nunchaku" stance, it can obliterate the AI if used well, by enabling the player to string attacks together into a ridiculous frenzy that will generally rip through the AI. Unfortunately it's also a necessary component of the final boss fight, which I'll get into in a bit, so it's best reserved for the final battle.

In the meantime, the game throws challenging fights at you. And I do mean challenging. At least twice you have to face an updated form of Endurance matches, where you take on two fully capable opponents at the same time. One match imposes a time limit of 60 seconds to win; this is the only time you are facing a timer. In one battle an enemy uses projectiles, while in another fight in an ice factory, you beat your opponent down to 1/3 of their health, and then the fight changes and you have to close in on them while they launch ice blocks at you. While it's nice to see the mixing up of ideas, several of the fights feature the same opponents repeated, and the game is generally punishingly cruel about how these ideas are implemented, meaning creativity =/= fun. During this whole time you also need to be building up with chi(which is also aided by a couple of bonus levels involving hitting a target dummy), though you lose a bit of chi every time you are hit, so if you don't get good fast, you're pretty much gonna be screwed if you even survive long enough to get to the finale. To add to this frustration, blocking is very touchy and apparently requires perfect timing to execute.

And then there is the final boss fight, against a teleporting phantasm who can hit half the screen at any given time thanks to his superior reach. This is the "impossible" portion of the game, and while it's certainly not impossible, it is extremely tricky to win. First, you have to beat the phantasm until he has absolutely no life left. Second, you have to enter "nunchaku" stance. And third, you then have to instigate a special throw from point-blank range in which you jump up and strangle the phantasm to death using your nunchucks. Screw up and do this too early in the fight, and the final boss will absolutely wreck you. Try to block his moves, and he'll teleport behind and wreck you. Try to go for a combo with your kicks or nunchucks, and he'll suddenly break you with a kick. After having faced this boss multiple times, I finally discovered the key was to use the nunchucks, whip him once, and then jump to avoid his kick, all while praying to God he didn't teleport behind me and beat me into a corner. He still did it quite a few times, which brings up the other quirk of the final boss battle: the possibility of taking him on to get your life back is completely removed in the final battle. Lose here and it's a definite game over, no matter what.

Beat the final boss, and you're awarded with a CONGRATULATIONS splash screen, a chance to enter your initials in the scoreboard, and then a message honoring Bruce Lee and Jeet Kune Do before the credits scroll while the silhouette of Lee performs various moves at the top of the screen. In short: it ain't worth it. I do not feel rewarded in any way...beyond the fact I literally strangled Death to death. That was cool, even if it was a pain in the ass to pull off. But really there's little reason to ever go back and play this game again. I don't recommend it, even to the most die hard of Bruce Lee or fighting game fans.

Anyway, that only leaves me with two fighting games to beat on the Super Nintendo that were released in the US: King of the Monsters 1 and 2.