Anything that is gaming related that doesn't fit well anywhere else
User avatar
Sarge
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 7187
Joined: Thu Mar 14, 2013 12:08 pm

Re: Games Beaten 2016

by Sarge Wed Dec 28, 2016 1:05 pm

I can't even imagine playing Rex Rocket without a pad. Oof. How'd you manage that?
Hardcore Retro Gaming - Talk about games ten years old or older!
“History isn't just the story of bad people doing bad things. It's quite as much a story of people trying to do good things. But somehow, something goes wrong.” -- C.S. Lewis
User avatar
BoneSnapDeez
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 18822
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 1:08 pm
Location: Maine

Re: Games Beaten 2016

by BoneSnapDeez Wed Dec 28, 2016 1:50 pm

prfsnl_gmr wrote:All of them are good, and I recommend all of them to fans of the genre. (Ninja Smasher! was the genre's biggest surprise, and despite its low ranking, I was quite satisfied with Bloody Vampire.) I am also certain that Rex Rocket would have edged out both Dust and Ninja Smasher! if I had played it with tactile controls.


I have played bits of Ninja Smasher! and Bloody Vampire this year and have enjoyed both. They're both very "nostalgic" games - Ninja Smasher! has graphics that look ripped straight from Kirby and Bloody Vampire is a bit like Popful Mail. I'd like to finish both next year.

I'm new to the whole phone/tablet gaming scene. I really need to figure out which of my games can support controllers because I loathe touch controls.
User avatar
prfsnl_gmr
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 10041
Joined: Mon Jun 01, 2009 10:26 pm
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina

Re: Games Beaten 2016

by prfsnl_gmr Wed Dec 28, 2016 3:52 pm

Sarge wrote:I can't even imagine playing Rex Rocket without a pad. Oof. How'd you manage that?


I had to restart a lot... :lol:

Truthfully, playing without a pad required me to really, really learn the bosses patterns and to think a little differently about the game's obstacles. I had to approach them a little more cautiously, and I had to plan my way through each section very carefully since: (1) my inputs would failed with some frequency; (2) I often had to use my eyes to ensure that I was pressing the right button; and (3) I had trouble pulling off some maneuvers that would have been easy with tactile controls.

It took a while to get used to them - and gaining the teleportation ability through me for a bit of a loop since I had to use even more buttons - but I eventually took down Lauren without too much difficulty. (The Crusher Bot gave me the most trouble.)

BoneSnapDeez wrote:I'm new to the whole phone/tablet gaming scene. I really need to figure out which of my games can support controllers because I loathe touch controls.


They're actually surprisingly great for adventure games, puzzle games, and RPGs, and they're not bad for shmups. Platformers, however... :?
User avatar
MrPopo
Moderator
 
Posts: 22452
Joined: Tue Aug 26, 2008 1:01 pm
Location: Orange County, CA

Re: Games Beaten 2016

by MrPopo Wed Dec 28, 2016 4:26 pm

First 50:
1. Oni - PC
2. Donkey Kong 64 - N64
3. Yoshi's Story - N64
4. Neverwinter Nights: Shadows of Undrentide - PC
5. Forsaken 64 - N64
6. Bloodrayne: Betrayal - PSN
7. Fire Emblem Seisen no Keifu - SNES
8. Fire Emblem Shin Monshō no Nazo: Hikari to Kage no Eiyū - Nintendo DS
9. Valkyria Chronicles 3 - PSP
10. Ready 2 Rumble Boxing - DC
11. Rise of the Tomb Raider - PC
12. XCOM 2 - PC
13. Shadowrun Hong Kong Bonus Campaign - PC
14. Fire Emblem Fates: Conquest - 3DS
15. Fire Emblem Fates: Birthright - 3DS
16. Lagrange Point - NES
17. Fire Emblem Fates: Revelations - 3DS
18. Cybernator - SNES
19. Outwars - PC
20. Resident Evil - GC
21. Resident Evil 2 - GC
22. Resident Evil 3 - GC
23. Resident Evil Code Veronica X - GC
24. Dino Crisis - PSX
25. Resident Evil 5 - PC
26. Dark Souls 3 - PS4
27. The Banner Saga 2 - PC
28. Bravely Second - 3DS
29. Star Fox Zero - Wii U
30. Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War - PC
31. Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War - Winter Assault - PC
32. Doom (2016) - PC
33. Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War - Dark Crusade - PC
34. Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War - Soulstorm - PC
35. Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine - PC
36. Doom 64 - N64
37. Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War II - PC
38. Super Empire Strikes Back - SNES
39. Might & Magic 3 - Isles of Terra - PC
40. Mirror's Edge Catalyst - PC
41. Sonic 2 - Genesis
42. Resident Evil Revelations - PC
43. Resident Evil Revelations 2 - PC
44. Tokyo Mirage Sessions #FE - Wii U
45. Kirby: Planet Robobot
46. Sin: Wages of Sin - PC
47. Torchlight II - PC
48. Star Ocean: Integrity & Faithlessness - PS4
49. Axiom Verge - PS4
50. Shadow Complex Remastered - PS4

51. Ori and the Blind Forest - Xbox One
52. AM2R - PC
53. Total Annihilation - PC
54. I Am Setsuna - PS4
55. Planetary Annihilation Titans - PC
56. Deus Ex: Mankind Divided - PC
57. Dark Reign - Rise of the Shadowhand - PC
58. Dragon Age Inquisition - Jaws of Hakkon - PC
59. Dragon Age Inquisition - The Descent - PC
60. Dragon Age Inquisition - Trespasser - PC
61. The Witcher 3 - Hearts of Stone - PC
62. The Witcher 3 - Blood & Wine - PC
63. ReCore - Xbox One
64. Final Fantasy Tactics - PS1
65. Resident Evil 6 - PC
66. Knuckles Chaotix - 32X
67. Assault Suit Leynos - PS4
68. Might & Magic 2 - Gate to Another World - PC
69. Might & Magic 4 - Clouds of Xeen - PC
70. Might & Magic 5 - Darkside of Xeen - PC
71. Might & Magic 4&5 - World of Xeen - PC
72. Rise of the Triad - PC
73. Batman Arkham Knight - PC
74. Rise of the Triad (2013) - PC
75. Dishonored 2 - PC
76. TIS-100 - PC
77. Tyranny - PC
78. StarCraft II - Nova Covert Ops - PC
79. Raiden Fighters 2 - Xbox 360
80. Pokémon Omega Ruby - 3DS
81. Turok: Dinosaur Hunter - PC
82. 7th Dragon III Code VFD - 3DS
83. World of Final Fantasy - PS4
84. Ys I: Ancient Ys Vanished - TG-CD
85. Ys II: Ancient Ys Vanished - The Final Chapter - TG-CD
86. Duke Nukem 3D 20th Anniversary World Tour - PC
87. Titanfall 2 - PC
88. Final Fantasy - NES
89. Eradicator - PC
90. Final Fantasy II - NES

Final Fantasy II builds on what Square learned with Final Fantasy and is bigger in every way. It's also the single most broken entry in the series, even moreso than VIII in some ways. But on the flip side, if you're not breaking it you'll have a hard time with it due to the underlying system.

So most people know that Final Fantasy II is based around a system of "exercise it to increase it". If you swing with your sword your sword skill and strength go up. If you cast magic your spell level and int go up. If you lose a lot of health or MP those stats go up. If you get attacked a lot the relevant evasion multiplier goes up. All well and good. But at least on the NES version the balance is completely out of whack. Weapon/spell levels and evasion multipliers gain exp at the end of a battle, and once that reached 100 it levels up. However, the experience gained in a battle has the general formula of Uses - CurrentLevel + MonsterLevel + Bonus. So uses would be number of times you decided to attack someone/cast a spell at someone or the number of times an enemy attacks you/casts a spell at you. The bonus can be positive or negative; the bonus for spell experience is +3 (which encourages you to cast a bunch of magic in a single battle for a lot of total experience) while the bonus for physical evasion multiplier is -3 (so you need to be attacked a lot and only enemies count). MonsterLevel is a number from 1-7 that indicates approximately how hard enemies are; goblins aren't worth much to you compared to Malboros. The net result is that for these stats you tend to have a fairly solid progression through the game, as if fights keep lasting about the same amount of rounds then you're going to rise to a skill level that marches in step with the increasing monster difficulty. However, there's a bug with the weapon and skill levels. A use is defined as you selecting an attack or spell and then confirming it, so the control moves to the next character. If you then cancel and go back to the first character, you can repeat the action and get a second use. If you think this means you can guarantee a level up for your weapon in every single fight, you're right (cap is 16). You can do the same thing with spells, but it is much more tedious because there is a lot more menuing.

The other stats have a chance to go up at the end of combat under certain conditions. Strength, intelligence, and willpower will raise if a random number rolled between 1 and N is less than the number of times you attacked/cast black magic/cast white magic. N is 45 for strength, 25 for int, 15 for will. So if you select attack 46 times in battle then you get a guaranteed strength up. There's also a one in 8 chance that raising one of those stats will lower another. HP, Vit, MP, and Magic (which governs how much MP you gain on a level) have a chance of going up based on how much your ending HP/MP is compared to your starting HP/MP when compared to your max HP/MP. In other words, max HP divided by unhealed HP loss gives a number, then a random number is rolled and compared. Generally, losing half your HP/MP will pretty much guarantee a boost, and you need to lose at least 1/8th of your max for a chance. The way this can be exploited is the spell Swap, which trades your HP and MP with the target. A good target is the 6 HP goblins in the starting area. That will pretty much guarantee you get Vit up, HP up, Mgc up, MP up.

So as you can see, understanding the systems let you create this horribly buffed up characters that laugh at danger. I was completely immune to basic attacks and magic did pitiful damage to me. Occasionally high level status magic would get through, but my greatest danger ended up being some high level physical based attack "magic", things like rock throw, which broke through my defenses. I was regularly one and two shotting things, with the main exception being enemies whose defense was so high compared to my weapon power that I only got through damage on crits (it was clear the devs wanted me to use magic on them).

So moving past the hilariously broken game system, FFII focuses a ton on story. Your characters have portraits and speak and do missions for the princess as part of the rebellion against the empire. There's a system of learning keywords that is similar to Morrowind's conversation system, where speaking a keyword to someone can unlock additional information or cause them to join you. You also can sometimes use items to get someone's attention or activate something. Rather than FF1's "go on the quest to kill the four bosses" this game has objectives that make sense in the context of the rebellion. They've also updated how they handle general graphics; dungeons have taller walls and in general everything feels much larger. There's a clear evolution in the art.

I think if this game was a bit more traditional in terms of how character building worked that it probably would have been remembered better. FFIII uses the same combat algorithms and the same stats, it's just the growth is pretty much set in stone and tied to your level and job level. They even carry the stats into IV (though I don't know if the algorithms are all the same; the status screen definitely looks the same). FFII is also the place of a lot of firsts. You have the first appearance of several staples like Chocobos, Cid, Malboros, Couerls, Bombs, Flans, and Behemoths. The first boss music appears along with the Chocobo theme. And finally, the first appearance of the MP system.
Image
Games Beaten: 2015 2016 2017 2018
Blizzard Entertainment Software Developer - All comments and views are my own and not representative of the company.
User avatar
Sarge
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 7187
Joined: Thu Mar 14, 2013 12:08 pm

Re: Games Beaten 2016

by Sarge Wed Dec 28, 2016 7:36 pm

prfsnl_gmr wrote:They're actually surprisingly great for adventure games, puzzle games, and RPGs, and they're not bad for shmups. Platformers, however... :?

That's exactly it. I had a fun time with Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis on my tablet, and I'm sure I'd enjoy more adventure games in that capacity. However, my love for platformers cannot be sated on a system with no tactile feedback. And since I love really tough games quite often (like Rex Rocket), I need a consistent control mechanism. Often touch-based platformers have been simplified too much, so that I don't find them particularly compelling anymore.
Hardcore Retro Gaming - Talk about games ten years old or older!
“History isn't just the story of bad people doing bad things. It's quite as much a story of people trying to do good things. But somehow, something goes wrong.” -- C.S. Lewis
User avatar
prfsnl_gmr
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 10041
Joined: Mon Jun 01, 2009 10:26 pm
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina

Re: Games Beaten 2016

by prfsnl_gmr Wed Dec 28, 2016 7:50 pm

Sarge wrote:
prfsnl_gmr wrote:They're actually surprisingly great for adventure games, puzzle games, and RPGs, and they're not bad for shmups. Platformers, however... :?

That's exactly it. I had a fun time with Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis on my tablet, and I'm sure I'd enjoy more adventure games in that capacity. However, my love for platformers cannot be sated on a system with no tactile feedback. And since I love really tough games quite often (like Rex Rocket), I need a consistent control mechanism. Often touch-based platformers have been simplified too much, so that I don't find them particularly compelling anymore.


Try Bloo Kid. It's challenging, fun (and free!).
User avatar
BoneSnapDeez
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 18822
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 1:08 pm
Location: Maine

Re: Games Beaten 2016

by BoneSnapDeez Wed Dec 28, 2016 8:04 pm

MrPopo wrote:90. Final Fantasy II - NES


NES and not Famicom? Do you have this?
Image

Despite its reputation, I don't think FFII is a bad game by any stretch. Sure it's best played when exploited, but once you get the hang of it it's pretty alright. I'd rank it above most modern JRPGs.
User avatar
MrPopo
Moderator
 
Posts: 22452
Joined: Tue Aug 26, 2008 1:01 pm
Location: Orange County, CA

Re: Games Beaten 2016

by MrPopo Wed Dec 28, 2016 8:06 pm

I don't differentiate between the two.
Image
Games Beaten: 2015 2016 2017 2018
Blizzard Entertainment Software Developer - All comments and views are my own and not representative of the company.
User avatar
Sarge
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 7187
Joined: Thu Mar 14, 2013 12:08 pm

Re: Games Beaten 2016

by Sarge Wed Dec 28, 2016 8:20 pm

I can't remember if I beat FFII on NES, but I know I got pretty far into it. I did beat it on GBA, and the rebalance makes it fantastic there, if a bit too easy.
Hardcore Retro Gaming - Talk about games ten years old or older!
“History isn't just the story of bad people doing bad things. It's quite as much a story of people trying to do good things. But somehow, something goes wrong.” -- C.S. Lewis
User avatar
pierrot
Next-Gen
 
Posts: 3510
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2012 2:54 am
Location: Banned

Re: Games Beaten 2016

by pierrot Wed Dec 28, 2016 10:01 pm

1-50
1: Rakugaki Ninja (Mac)
2: Doukutsu Monogatari (Cave Story) (Mac)
3: Dimahoo (ARC)
4: Rez (DC)
5: L.O.L.: Lack of Love (DC)
6: Rockman 7: Shukumei no Taiketsu! (SFC)
7: Ganbare! Daiku no Gen-san (SFC)
8: Super Metroid (SFC)
9: Dragon Force (Saturn)
10: Rocket Knight Adventures (GEN)
11: Quackshot: Starring Donald Duck (GEN)
12: Mario Story (Paper Mario) (N64)
13: Rockman & Forte (SFC)
14: Sparkster (GEN)
15: Lumino City (Steam)
16: Braid (Mac)
17: Kirby: Air Ride (GCN)
18: Billy Hatcher and the Giant Egg (GCN)
19: Starfox Assault (GCN)
20: Terra Phantastica (Saturn)
21: Pikmin (GCN)
22: Doubutsu Banchou (Cubivore) (GCN)
23: Eternal Darkness: Manekareta 13-nin (GCN)
24: Dragon Slayer: Eiyuu Densetsu (MD)
25: Densetsu no Ogre Battle: The March of the Black Queen (Saturn)
26: Cibele (Mac)
27: Linda Cube - Kanzenban (Saturn)
28: Sonic the Hedgehog (MD-JP)
29: Pulseman (MD)
30: Surging Aura (MD)
31: Pu-Li-Ru-La (Saturn)
32: Purikula Daisakusen (Saturn)
33: Daytona USA (Saturn)
34: MegaMan ZX (DS)
35: Red Arimer II (Gargoyle's Quest II) (FC)
36: Valkyrie no Bouken: Toki no Kagi Densetsu (FC)
37: Hi no Tori - Hou-ou Hen: Gaou no Bouken (FC)
38: DuckTales (NES)
39: Chip 'n Dale: Rescue Rangers (NES)
40: Groove on Fight: Gouketsuji Ichizoku 3 (Saturn)
41: Omakase! Savers (Saturn)
42: Hamelin no Violin-hiki (SFC)
43: Dark Half (SFC)
44: Alcahest (SFC)
45: Super Mario World: SMB 4 (SFC)
46: MIckey's Magical Adventure (SFC)
47: Dragon Quest III (SFC)
48: The Great Circus Mystery Starring Mickey & Minnie (GEN)
49: Gyakuten Saiban 3 (DS)
50: Dynamite Deka 2 (DC)

51: Digital Devil Story: Megami Tensei II (FC)
52: Biohazard 2 (DC)
53: Biohazard 3: Last Escape (DC)
54: Biohazard Code: Veronica - Kanzenban (DC)
55: Lunar: The Silver Star (SCD)
56: Escape Goat (GOG)
57: Magicool (PCE-CD)
58: Hotline Miami (GOG)
59: Berserk: Millennium Falcon Hen Wasurebana no Shou (DC)
60: Dennou Senki Virtual On: Oratorio Tangram (DC)
61: Mr. Driller (DC)
62: Zombie Revenge (DC)
63: Fighting Vipers 2 (DC)
64: Frame Gride (DC)
65: Space Channel 5 (DC)
66: Space Channel 5 - Part 2 (DC)
67: Super Street Fighter II X: Grand Master Challenge (DC)
68: Street Fighter III: New Generation (DC)
69: Street Fighter III: 2nd Impact (DC)
70: Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike (DC)

I used to play Mr Driller: Drill Spirits for the DS a bit in college, back when my girlfriend at the time, or my roommate, would steal the cartridge to beat out my high scores in time attack mode. (Something that would happen a lot with Meteos, as well.) I would turn on the game some time later to find a bunch of new time attack records owned by one of the two of them, and I would be forced to set a bunch of new records myself, perpetuating a vicious cycle.
I feel like I'm not quite as good at Mr. Driller as I was back then, but it's still a fun game. I cleared the 500m arcade mode, and all of the time attack stages. "The Mansion," time attack stage was one of the most absurdly fun stages I've seen in a puzzle game. Otherwise, the presentation is quite good, although the soundtrack is a tad bizarre, and its gameplay is still solid, and exciting.

--

Zombie Revenge is a pretty intense 3D b'mup, with surprising depth. Where Dynamite Deka 2 is a ludicrous experience that largely keeps the player button mashing while grinning from ear to ear, Zombie Revenge is ready to beat the player's face in if he isn't intimately familiar with some of the finer mechanics of the game. I had to set the game to freeplay in order to make it past the third stage, which isn't even halfway through. It's pretty challenging, but the breadth of mechanics make it pretty entertaining. I'm fairly certain this is supposed to be part of the House of the Dead series, and actually--
--the sixth stage is the first stage of the first House of the Dead, which is a very cool addition.
The voice dialogue is cheesy and terrible, so that's good. Zombie Revenge seems to get very little respect, but I enjoyed it, and while I prefer Dynamite Deka 2, it and Zombie Revenge are comparable experiences, although ZR is a bit less irreverent. ZR is quite the looker, graphically speaking, as well.

--

I was a pretty big fan of Fighting Vipers on the Saturn, as a kid. I used to revel in the opportunity to play it on occasion at Toys r Us, or KB Toys. Fighting Vipers 2 is pretty much everything that's good about Fighting Vipers, with improved visuals. There's also a Super KO which can be performed by sacrificing all of your armor, and fireball motioning with all three buttons. It's very similar to the Instant Kill maneuvers in the Guilty Gear series.
At any rate, I beat the arcade mode with Honey, and Random mode with Emi. I don't really know what the difference is between the two modes other than that there's a bonus character that's only unlockable through Random mode. So, it's a relatively less technical fighting game, at least in comparison to VF, but a lot of fun to play.

--

Frame Gride is a pretty interesting game. The presentation is pretty remarkable, and quite different from what one would normally see on the console. It's basically just an arena fighter with fantasy themed mechs that can be pretty extensively customized. It plays fairly well, with movement mostly controlled with d-pad inputs, and trigger strafing. The camera can be moved around a bit with the analog stick, but I almost never did this as it was a bit too cumbersome. It would have been nice to have a second stick on the controller for camera control, as the field of view is normally a bit limited, but this is only really an issue in the final battle.
The game starts out like the Langrisser series, or the SNES version of Dragon Quest III, asking a bunch of questions of the player to determine his initial load out. I seemed to get the best weapons right away based on my answers. There's an elemental attack component to the game as well, but I didn't pay a lot of attention to it other than keeping my squires the element of my mech. It runs tremendously well, and some of the stages are truly breathtaking (one of the optional battles in the clouds, in particular). Through the battles, one collects gems, which can be used to craft new parts for the mech, or "squires" (familiar-style helper mechs that can be summoned during battles). The main campaign is pretty short, and there's not a lot going on in terms of the story, but it's fun for what it is, and if one were so compelled to craft everything in the game, it could be played for many many hours. There was also a netplay component to the game back in the day, which would have been pretty fun to experience, I'm sure. Aside from the final boss being a complete piece of shit, it's a fun game. I enjoyed it.

--

I haven't played either of the Space Channel 5 games in many years, but it was nice to go back to them. The original JP-DC version of the first game (which I played this time) is unfortunately marred by some intense dips in frame rate, especially in the latter stages. It may have been exacerbated by the trains of people I had following Ulala all the time, due to the perfect NPC save rate I was riding through each stage, but even on the first boss, there were a couple inputs I couldn't get, because of the game jumping around while trying to display all the character models. It's still a fun game, and I'll always have a special place in my heart for the first SC5, but Part 2 is such an astoundingly monumental leap in quality. Part 2 is such gaming bliss as to be perfection. Compared to the first game, it ramps just about everything up to 11: Graphics, sound, simultaneous polygonal models, unlockables, choreography, bosses. It's such a blast to play, is extremely stable, and just the rhythmical back and forth in boss battles gives me chills most of the time. Replaying it reminded me why it's one of my favorite games, and I immediately went through the second loop of the game after finishing the primary loop. A great series, that really kicked off my infatuation with Mizuguchi's projects.

--

I've never been a huge fan of Sto2. I used to play it occasionally in the arcades, but I was more drawn to Mortal Kombat, at the time. Now I don't really care about either, but I respect it for its historical significance. Super Sto2 adds a little bit more technicality to the formula with super arts, and a limited amount of throw tech, but it's just not really my jam. I like it for adding Cammy to the roster, but it's otherwise unimpressive to me. This Dreamcast version does give the option to turn Turbo up to 6, which is a pretty comical thing to behold. I managed to beat the game with Cammy after dumping in 62 credits or so. I am truly THE street fighter--.

--

Capcom needed to stop the Street Fighter series once they were finished with III. There was no way it was going to get any better, and nothing before it in the series can compare either. Aesthetically, mechanically, and just in terms of pure fun, the SF III sub-series is where it's at. So maybe 3rd Strike isn't the most balanced game in terms of high level play, but I love the characters, and the stages. Each of the three games have their own bits of panache, and are generally pretty inviting in how they play. Even some of the higher level strategy in 3rd strike is pretty easy to pick up. I just kind of wish Capcom had continued on with SF III a bit more, instead of derailing things with EX and IV.
Elena is my rock.
Image
Return to General Gaming

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests