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Gunstar Green
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by Gunstar Green Wed Mar 13, 2019 5:25 pm

Ah, Atlantis no Nazo, another legendary Famicom kusoge.
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by BoneSnapDeez Wed Mar 13, 2019 7:19 pm

And I haven't even written about the Famicom games that I found to be too terrible and/or difficult to finish. It goes so much deeper...
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by ElkinFencer10 Thu Mar 14, 2019 1:59 pm

Games Beaten in 2019 So Far - 16
* denotes a replay

January (12 Games Beaten)
1. Army Men 3D - PlayStation - January 1*
2. Ys I: Ancient Ys Vanished - NES - January 4
3. Mega Man - NES - January 6
4. Mega Man 2 - NES - January 6
5. Mega Man 3 - NES - January 6
6. Mega Man 4 - NES - January 7
7. Dr. Discord's Conquest - NES - January 7
8. Mega Man 5 - NES - January 26
9. Just Cause 3 - PlayStation 4 - January 26
10. Mega Man 6 - NES - January 27
11. Persona 5: Dancing in Starlight - Vita - January 27
12. Mobile Suit Gundam: Encounters in Space - PlayStation 2 - January 27


February (2 Games Beaten)
13. Earth Defense Force 5 - PlayStation 4 - February 2
14. Fallout 76 - PlayStation 4 - February 3


March (2 Games Beaten)
15. Octopath Traveler - Switch - March 2
16. Resident Evil 0 - PlayStation 4 - March 9


16. Resident Evil 0 - PlayStation 4 - March 9

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I first played Resident Evil 0 back on Gamecube, and it was actually one of my early Resident Evil experiences after the PlayStation original and Resident Evil 4 (which I played on Wii). Zero's release at the end of 2002 was the perfect accompaniment for the remake of Resident Evil that had come out in the beginning of 2002 as it takes place immediately before the first game not far from the infamous Umbrella mansion. It was originally a Gamecube exclusive before being ported to Wii and then remastered in HD for Microsoft's and Sony's 2000s HD systems, and while it does somewhat show its age as a 17 year old game, it still holds up as a pretty good game in 2019.

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In Resident Evil Zero, a team of elite cops from Raccoon City - a sister squad to the STARS members that starred in the first game - is sent to investigate a series of cannibalistic murders in the forested mountains near Raccoon City. They quickly discover a crashed military police vehicle and two dead MPs who were apparently transporting a dangerous murderer named Billy Cohen. You start off playing as Rebecca, a rookie STARS medic, and are investigating a mysteriously stalled train while also searching for Cohen. Upon realizing that there's some cataclysmic outbreak going on, Rebecca realizes that the only hope for survival is to cooperate with Billy.

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The game overall feels a lot like the original Resident Evil; most of it takes place in a mansion with zombies where you have to solve ridiculous puzzles that would never exist in the real world in order to proceed. It's really good overall, but there are a few stylistic choices that really kill it for me to some extent. The biggest issue is the inventory. Inventory space is extremely limited which, in and of itself, isn't a problem. The problem is that there's no item storage like in the original game, and some of the items take two spaces. The hookshot especially is a problem because it takes two slots, and you need it at various points through the game right up near the end, but it never tells you when you're done needing it. Like, I get it, scary horror spoopy games use limited inventory to make it spoopier, but this is just annoying.

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Having gone from playing on Gamecube to playing PlayStation 4, the visuals were quite impressive given that it was just a simple upscale. The controls can feel a little archaic especially where the tank controls are concerned, but the game is much more playable in a modern context than 1, 2, 3, or Code Veronica are (although I still love those games). Resident Evil 0 does leave a bit to be desired in the details, but it's still. an extremely playable game. Whether you play it on the Gamecube, the Wii, or the PS4 or Xbox One, it's a fantastic experience.
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by Ack Fri Mar 15, 2019 11:28 am

1. Dusk (PC)(FPS)
2. Project: Snowblind (PC)(FPS)
3. Soldier of Fortune: Platinum Edition (PC)(FPS)
4. Ziggurat (PC)(FPS)
5. Wolfenstein 3D: Ultimate Challenge (PC)(FPS)
6. Destiny 2 (PC)(FPS/RPG)
7. Destiny 2: Curse of Osiris (PC)(FPS/RPG)
8. Destiny 2: Warmind (PC)(FPS/RPG)

9. Destiny 2: Forsaken (PC)(FPS/RPG)
10. Star Wars: Rebel Assault (PC)(Rail Shooter)

11. Castle Werewolf (PC)(FPS)
12. Project Warlock (PC)(FPS)

Yet another FPS for me this year.

Popo has already beaten this, and he did a great job of breaking it down. Project Warlock combines a lot of the feel of mid-90s twitch FPS design with a gorgeous 2D sprite retro-aesthetic, an RPG-esque system that allows you to improve personal stats along the lines of max health, ammo capacity, and melee damage, and a variety of weapons that can be "upgraded" into different styles based on what you like. These variations may do things like up the power and ammo consumption, add burning effects, add area damage, or make other significant modifications that completely change how you will use it. I have my favorites, but someone else playing through might well disagree with me and go a totally different route, and that's perfectly fine.

There are three difficulties on tap for Project Warlock. The first two aren't terribly different; one gives you infinite lives while the other uses a one-up feature where you have to restart the game if you run out. Odds are that you won't run out though, so don't worry so much. I beat the game with 30+ lives when I played through it on this difficulty. The last is Hardcore, where you get no lives, so dying means you restart the entire game. Oh, and enemies do double damage and move twice as fast, which is hilarious when you face off against some of the running enemies. I took on a killer yeti at one point who could practically fly, and that had me howling with how goofy he looked rapidly charging me before I hit him in the face with my ax.

Unfortunately, there are some huge issues with the game on the back end. I don't mean in the latter half of the game, I mean it was developed in the Unity Engine with some questionable design choices. I'm not able to modify my Options right now, because my anti-virus blocks it. Why? That's because Project Warlock modifies Windows registry data when you adjust things in the game. Yeah, no, that's a hard pass, and it's the only reason why I wouldn't recommend this title to others.

Look, I'm enjoying it. I've run through it on the two lower difficulties and am now working my way through on a Hardcore pass. I like the game enough to keep going, though once I finish, it's coming off my computer and staying off. But what you do get in the game is a hell of a lot of fun, and I'm happy to talk builds with anyone else who has the game.
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by MrPopo Fri Mar 15, 2019 12:25 pm

That's because Project Warlock modifies Windows registry data when you adjust things in the game. Yeah, no, that's a hard pass, and it's the only reason why I wouldn't recommend this title to others.

So he's using the registry for his config data? That's just being authentic to old PC games running on Windows.
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by Ack Fri Mar 15, 2019 12:32 pm

MrPopo wrote:
That's because Project Warlock modifies Windows registry data when you adjust things in the game. Yeah, no, that's a hard pass, and it's the only reason why I wouldn't recommend this title to others.

So he's using the registry for his config data? That's just being authentic to old PC games running on Windows.

It is, but it's a no-fly zone for me nowadays. This is something that I am glad to not see much of, particularly as I don't know if I can trust a developer.
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by MrPopo Sat Mar 16, 2019 1:11 pm

1. Octopath Traveler - Switch
2. Dusk - PC
3. Forsaken Remastered - PC
4. Tales of Eternia - PS1
5. Resident Evil 2 (2019) - PC
6. Pokémon Trading Card Game - GBC
7. Metro Exodus - PC
8. Thronebreaker: The Witcher Tales - PC
9. Magic: The Gathering - PC

So my journey through these digital card games was started when I thought "Man, I want to play something like the old Microprose Magic game." But even though they scratched the itch, I wanted the real thing. And when I was at the library at work with a coworker (who was picking up something he reserved) I saw there was a row of boxed PC games available, including the old Magic game. Naturally, I had to snag it and get it working. It ended up taking a Win 95 VM that's kind of janky (the support is not really prioritized by Oracle), but it was playable. And now I made it through.

Back in 97 Wizards of the Coast and Microprose made a digital version of their popular card game Magic the Gathering. The basic story is that on the plane of Shandalar there is a wall keeping out the baddies from the plane, and then one asshole corrupts the five wizards (one for each color) that maintains the barrier. They're now trying to take down the barrier and you must stop them. It gives a reason for why everything is trying to fight you, but there's not really anything deeper than that. The base game uses the cards from 4th edition plus a selection of cards that didn't make it to 4th that were in Beta (stuff like the Power Nine, Time Vault, Wheel of Fortune, but not the duals) and then the expansion adds in the Duals, Arabian Nights, and Antiquities. I started the game when Revised and Fallen Empires came out, so these were the cards I either played with or saw in the singles binder. So needless to say, it gave me all kinds of nostalgia.

In terms of gameplay there are two aspects to it. The main dueling part is actually quite similar to Magic Online in terms of interface (which is a pretty bad indictment of the Magic Online client). You can set stops in various phases, and there's a handful of shortcuts that automatically do stuff for you (double click a spell and it'll automatically tap lands for you, and there's a nice dialog for Fireball to let you figure out how much mana you need to do so much damage to so many targets). It gets the job done. The between dueling is you wandering the world. It's a randomly generated world dotted with towns and cities and dungeons and castles. Towns and cities are both sources of cards and quests; they have a shop where you can purchase cards and quests are a task you can do, such as "go to this city", "bring a type of card to this city", and "defeat a monster that will spawn around this locale". Completing quests has a few types of rewards; you might get a free card of a certain type (such as green card or an enchantment), you might get a colored amulet (which can be traded for cards or used on some abilities when you're on the world map), or you might get a mana link. The latter is something the cities give, and each mana link lets you start a duel with one more life. When you start the game your starting life is only 10 (and your opponents might range between 10 and 27 life). However, cities can also be attacked by the enemies; if an attack is not beaten off they will capture the city, which will remove any mana link you have with the city and if a given wizard captures enough cities you game over. Dungeons are randomly placed and are a source of the best cards; if you want a Time Walk or a Lotus you need to go into them. Finally, the Castles are the lairs of the five wizards; you must battle your way in and defeat the wizard inside.

Castles and Dungeons require a bit more explanation. They are isometric mazes which have enemies at fixed points. They all have some set of rules that apply to all duels. Usually this is that a particular card will start in play (such as a Mana Flare or an Elder Land Wurm); these cards always start on your opponent's side, so sometimes it's a symmetrical benefit (Mana Flare) and sometimes it's just an advantage they have (Elder Land Wurm). Additionally, dungeons have extra rules; maybe instants are banned, and every dungeon I saw also had a "your life carries over between duels" rule, so that prevents you from just Channel Fireballing everything. Each dungeon and castle has a theme around the creatures within, such as the enemies are running green decks. In dungeons all you need to do is grab the special cards (they are treasure squares) while in the castle all you need to do is defeat the wizard. So careful movement to minimize encounters is vital; if you lose a duel inside either you get kicked out and suffer a penalty. Dungeons will relocate and a castle loss will trigger an immediate attack on a city.

Now, the duels are super old school. It's pre-Sixth Edition rules (which has subtle but important differences) and you play for ante. This is one of the primary ways you get cards, as even though you both risk a single card in the duel (and thus won't ever draw that card), when you win you can either take it and a couple other randomly selected cards or you can get a dungeon clue. This is a series of information about a dungeon; its location, what cards you can get, and what rules are in place. If a dungeon moves you'll need to get a new clue to find it (though you can also stumble upon it). One thing you will notice is that there are some noticeable AI limitations. The AI doesn't really understand tempo, so it only attacks if it won't lose its creature given the information it knows (which includes that it has Giant Growth in hand, but not that you have a Mishra's Factory and the ability to activate it). It will happily trade on block, but only chump blocks when it would otherwise die. There's also some bugs where the AI's decision matrix doesn't look far enough ahead; a prominent example is two Mana Vaults tapped at the start of the computer's turn with less than eight mana available through lands and other sources; it will untap one, then activate it and another land to untap the other, and back and forth until it's down to one tapped and one untapped and all tapped lands (whereas a human would just untap the one and move on). These behaviors can and need to be exploited at times; I had a deck that was a bunch of small first strikers and some Serra Angels as my finisher. With just two 2 power first strikers I could hold off giant armies because even though two or three rounds of attacks with a sacrifice each time would kill me the computer would go "nope, not a good attack." Considering how hard it is to build a really tuned deck like we see in modern deck design (because of the randomness of card acquisition) being able to make do with what you have is important.

The game is overall a giant nostalgia trip. You get reminded of just how low the creature quality was back in those days and get to enjoy the old school art. I'd say this game is worth playing if you first started playing back when the cards in the game were current, because it'll bring back all those warm fuzzy feelings. The randomness in getting cards and slowly improving the deck also hearkens back to those days when you were cracking boosters, instead of just net decking and buying singles. If you're a more modern player then you would only want to play it if you want to experience a historical curiosity; you will likely be frustrated with the fewer lines of play than you are used to. There's no ETB effects, for example, as those weren't a thing until Mirage.
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Games Beaten: 2015 2016 2017 2018
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by MrPopo Sun Mar 17, 2019 1:25 am

1. Octopath Traveler - Switch
2. Dusk - PC
3. Forsaken Remastered - PC
4. Tales of Eternia - PS1
5. Resident Evil 2 (2019) - PC
6. Pokémon Trading Card Game - GBC
7. Metro Exodus - PC
8. Thronebreaker: The Witcher Tales - PC
9. Magic: The Gathering - PC
10. Ghost 1.0 - PC

Ghost 1.0 went on sale recently, and since it was on my Steam wishlist I used my recent finishing of Magic to pick it up. It's an indie metroidvania with a couple of interesting twists on the formula that keep things interesting. Structurally I'd say it's actually fairly close to Metroid Fusion; there isn't really any ability to sequence break and you are gatekeeped by accomplishing specific tasks in an area, which will eventually let you get a keycard that unlocks the next area. While accomplishing this the action regularly pauses in order for the story to be presented; what started off as a simple industrial espionage mission turns into something deeper. It's reasonably well told, and although the voice acting is amateur it's not bad.

Unlock most metroidvanias this game doesn't really have much in the way of unlockable movement abilities. There are a couple to be gained through the skill system, but they are completely optional; every route has a way to get through not requiring them (though they do let you go a bit quicker through a couple spots). Instead, the metroidvania structure is used to have areas that are large collections of interconnected rooms and the general structure of the platforming.

Now, the first thing the game brings to the table is the Survival mode, which is the default mode of the game. This gives the game roguelike elements; when you die you lose all your powerups and secondary weapons, as well as your cash. Your corpse will have one of your secondary weapons and three powerups on it; the rest have poofed. To compensate for this, the game is flush with ways of getting powered up again. The first is a series of rooms that have either required or optional arena fights. It's modeled as you tripping a security system and needing to wait for the alarm to die down; once it does you will get cash and an item. These items might be passive abilities (extra health, a shield that reflects bullets, a drone that shoots enemies automatically) or secondary weapons. They're always random, so you need to be able to adapt to what the game throws at you. The second way of getting gear is through the shops; most enemies drop a currency and you can trade that in for passives, secondary weapons, and "items". Items are reminiscent of the Estus flasks of Dark Souls; they have a limited number of uses but are recharged on death. There's both healing items and utility items. The final way of powering up is through the souls. Every room has a trigger that when activated will spawn a bunch of floating motes. Collecting all those motes will generate either an item or a permanent upgrade. Some of these upgrades are the same as the powerups you lose on death (+max health) while others are unique (start with a fixed amount of currency on death, chance of extra cash on pickups). Also, you will get alternate primary weapons as you defeat bosses, and those are kept on death. So although you will reset a few times, you will grow more powerful over time. The final way you gain power is through the skill system; there's a fixed number of skill points in the game and they can be spent in a variety of ways.

The second interesting thing the game does is the possession system. Your character is a "ghost" that inhabits an android body. At any time you can exit your body and explore the level. But the interesting part comes with the fact that you can possess nearly every enemy in the game. Once you do you can move them around and fire any weapons they have. This has a few different uses. The most obvious one is to possess one enemy and kill others; you can severely reduce the threat to you when used at the right time. It also gets used for level progression; sometimes you need to use an enemy to open a door on the other side of a gate. However, you need to be careful, as if your body is destroyed while you are in your ghost form you will have to restart, as your body is your anchor.

One thing you should be aware of is this game is designed for keyboard and mouse. The control scheme is WASD to move, space to jump, and mouse to move your cursor around. It's like Shadow Complex in that way. If you use a controller then the right stick will do the aiming, but it's limited to 45 degree increments, and critically all shots will go to their max distance. This is a major downside, as many subweapons will normally fire to wherever the reticle is and then stop, and you want to be able to place them precisely (e.g. a weapon that when it stops creates an X shaped laser and spins). The first boss pretty much requires the precise aiming of the mouse reticle, as you can only damage him on the soles of his feet while he is in the air. This is incredibly hard to do on a controller; after about 10 tries with my controller I switched to KB+M and one shotted him easily. Fortunately, the platforming isn't too bad with a keyboard; there's nothing involving precise back and forth like other metroidvanias. The game emphasizes gunplay over platforming.

Definitely a worthwhile entry in the genre.
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Games Beaten: 2015 2016 2017 2018
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by Ack Sun Mar 17, 2019 10:09 am

You know, I don't think I have even thought about that Magic: The Gathering game since the 1990s. Thanks for that trip down memory lane!
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Re: Games Beaten 2019

by Flake Mon Mar 18, 2019 9:05 am

January Games:
Megaman (Switch)
Megaman 2 (Switch)
Megaman 3 (Switch)
Megaman 4 (Switch)
Megaman 5 (Switch)
Megaman 6 (Switch)
Megaman 7 (Switch)
Megaman 8 (Switch)
Megaman 9 (Switch)
Megaman 10 (Switch)
Kirby's Dreamland (Wii)
Time Spinner (PS4)


February Games:
Megaman Legends (PSTV)
The Misadventures of Tron Bonne (PSTV)
Donkey Kong Country Returns (Wii)

March Games:

Metroid: Samus Returns (3DS)
Mario Galaxy (Wii)


Haven't been updating a lot lately! 3 more games down in 2019: DKCR, Samus Returns, and Mario Galaxy.

DKCR is a particularly satisfying game to put on this list. I've made numerous attempts to clear this game in the past, both on Wii and 3DS. I've always gotten stuck around the same point. I'm not sure what was different this time but I didn't hit 'the wall' like I have in the past. Instead everything seemed to come together. The timing problems I've had with bouncing off enemies when Diddy Kong is active went away, the controls felt natural, and the absolutely expert execution of the game in general carried me through. I am super glad I never gave up on this one.

Samus Returns was almost in the same camp as DKCR. I'd started it up a few times but it didn't really 'click'. Samus Returns is a very competent Metroid game but it is just too lacking in the 'atmosphere' category - which can be a damning drawback depending on how you approach appreciating the Metroid series as a whole. SR388 doesn't feel like an organic environment to explore. There's no flow to the world - random fire chambers in areas that are not generally super heated, too few varieties of enemies, the terrain all looks the same, etc. Compared to Zebes, Tallon IV, or even Metroid Fusion's 'recreation' of SR388 on a space colony, Samus Return's depiction of SR388 feels very much like what it is: A map created to run through with some items and abilities scattered around.

Samus Returns IS a fun game and it does add some neat gameplay elements borrowed from Zero Mission, Prime, and Other M but I wish that more liberties were taken with recreating Metroid II.

Mario Galaxy! I don't have much to say here. Great game! Beat it before. Wanted to beat it again. Captain Toad's first appearance!
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