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PS3 Repair - Best Options in 2020?

Posted: Tue Apr 28, 2020 9:46 am
by dsheinem
So I have a Backwards Compatible PS3 (from the MGS4 bundle) that recently stopped working and was showing some of the "Yellow Light Of Death" warning signs. Following some advice I found online, I took it apart to blow out dust, hoping that it would prevent the YLOD. When I put it back together, it won't even recognize that it is plugged in :oops: I am generally good at fixing things like this, but I can't be bothered right now to take on this particular headache/project. Replacing this machine with either a new or used one that features PS2 BC would be very expensive (and I wouldn't be able to migrate my data without my own machine working), so I am not especially interested that option.

So...has anyone recently had a PS3 repaired? I would like to ship it out for a professional fix, but I am dubious of the many sites online claiming to do this work (especially since the few I have contacted have not replied to me). I am eager to hear from anyone who has had their PS3 fixed recently - what service did you use, and would you recommend them?

Re: PS3 Repair - Best Options in 2020?

Posted: Tue Apr 28, 2020 4:05 pm
by Jagosaurus
Best advice I can give is to hit up the PS3 hacks subreddit. That scene will have hardware guys too.

r/ps3homebrew

I know on the xbox side I've been introduced to entire Discord servers and shops around xbox & 360 mod services, repair services, cap kits, new peripherals, parts, etc, etc. It's like the dark web for nerdy stuff :lol:

Re: PS3 Repair - Best Options in 2020?

Posted: Tue Apr 28, 2020 5:11 pm
by racketboy
Let me know if you come across any good pros to recommend.
I have a slim that gives the error light and won't fully power on.
But I also have my old backwards compatible unit that won't power on (and before that, the eject touch button stopped working)

Re: PS3 Repair - Best Options in 2020?

Posted: Wed Apr 29, 2020 1:47 am
by Anapan
Friend gave me his YLOD PS3, and I ended up just throwing it away in pieces. Sorry for your loss.

Re: PS3 Repair - Best Options in 2020?

Posted: Thu Apr 30, 2020 10:44 pm
by samsonlonghair
I’ve heard of people baking PS3 boards in the oven. Supposedly this will reflow the solder. It seems like voodoo to me. I remain skeptical that this would be a good fix. Even if it worked short term, I don’t think it would work long term.

Then again, if the PS3 is already broken, what do you have to lose? Don’t say oven fire.

Re: PS3 Repair - Best Options in 2020?

Posted: Fri May 01, 2020 9:39 am
by racketboy
samsonlonghair wrote:I’ve heard of people baking PS3 boards in the oven. Supposedly this will reflow the solder. It seems like voodoo to me. I remain skeptical that this would be a good fix. Even if it worked short term, I don’t think it would work long term.

Then again, if the PS3 is already broken, what do you have to lose? Don’t say oven fire.


Do they put the whole thing in there?
If it does work, there's probably some luck of cooking it just the right amount for reflow, but not overflow and damaging anything else. Wouldn't even the outer shell be damaged at some point?

Re: PS3 Repair - Best Options in 2020?

Posted: Fri May 01, 2020 9:49 am
by isiolia
racketboy wrote:Do they put the whole thing in there?
If it does work, there's probably some luck of cooking it just the right amount for reflow, but not overflow and damaging anything else. Wouldn't even the outer shell be damaged at some point?


No, just the board. It's not a unique approach (it's also been used on PC parts n' stuff), but it's also not a good one. It'd probably be more something to try in the hopes of it working long enough to back up the data, and anything beyond that being a bonus.

The only issue I had with a PS3 literally came down to the power cable flaking out. Somehow. I have one of the MGS4 bundle ones that was still working fine when I retired it for a Slim, but tend to assume phat PS3s will all eventually YLOD.

Re: PS3 Repair - Best Options in 2020?

Posted: Fri May 01, 2020 11:20 am
by marurun
A lot of early flash cards made by individuals needed a periodic reflow to make up for build quality issues. But that was never a great fix. Baking to reflow solder is generally more effective on thicker boards.