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Re: AC Adapter Compilation

Posted: Thu May 19, 2011 6:39 pm
by Ziggy587
It's the same output specs as an American SNES, but the input voltage is different. Japanese outlet receptacles are 100v, while NA outlets are 120v. Apparently you need a step down converter to safely use a Japanese power adapter in an American outlet, though I've read that people use them without a problem, just that the plug gets a little warmer. Maybe this will eventually burn out the plug?

Info taken from here: http://famicomworld.com/workshop/tech/f ... r-adaptor/

That link says you should use a step down converter so you don't risk damaging the console. As long as the OUTPUT specs are what they're suppose to be, I don't see any risk to damaging the console. You might fry the power adapter though.

It'd be retarded to use a step down converter anyway. Just find an AC adapter with the correct specs for use with a 120v outlet.

Re: AC Adapter Compilation

Posted: Thu May 19, 2011 7:24 pm
by Hobie-wan
I was thinking of redoing it with pictures, but like so many other things I plan on doing, I don't seem to get to it. :|

Re: AC Adapter Compilation

Posted: Sun Jul 10, 2011 9:56 am
by alienjesus
Here's an obscure one for you all. Does anyone know if the PAL Commodore Amiga 500 can use the same power adapter as the PAL Commodore 64. I'm assuming no, but I don't have my Amiga here to check. It might not even have the same connection for all I know.


Heres the details for the Commodore 64 power supply - I assume we're wanting the output here :p

5VDC 7.5W 9VAC 6.7VA

I have no idea what 'VA' means, nor why it seems to list both DC and AC.

Re: AC Adapter Compilation

Posted: Sun Jul 10, 2011 7:22 pm
by Hobie-wan
alienjesus wrote:Here's an obscure one for you all. Does anyone know if the PAL Commodore Amiga 500 can use the same power adapter as the PAL Commodore 64. I'm assuming no, but I don't have my Amiga here to check. It might not even have the same connection for all I know.


Heres the details for the Commodore 64 power supply - I assume we're wanting the output here :p

5VDC 7.5W 9VAC 6.7VA

I have no idea what 'VA' means, nor why it seems to list both DC and AC.


For US systems, the C64 has a round DIN and the Amiga has a square DIN, so probably not over there either.

VA is Volt-amps. It is sort of like a wattage rating.

Re: AC Adapter Compilation

Posted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 2:01 pm
by vlame
Ziggy587 wrote:It's the same output specs as an American SNES, but the input voltage is different. Japanese outlet receptacles are 100v, while NA outlets are 120v. Apparently you need a step down converter to safely use a Japanese power adapter in an American outlet, though I've read that people use them without a problem, just that the plug gets a little warmer. Maybe this will eventually burn out the plug?

Info taken from here: http://famicomworld.com/workshop/tech/f ... r-adaptor/

That link says you should use a step down converter so you don't risk damaging the console. As long as the OUTPUT specs are what they're suppose to be, I don't see any risk to damaging the console. You might fry the power adapter though.

It'd be retarded to use a step down converter anyway. Just find an AC adapter with the correct specs for use with a 120v outlet.

I picked this up hoping to use it with a toaster nes but never got around to it. Hoping to use it with my Super Famicom since the original power cord acts up.

Radioshack model 273-1680 [A]
input: 120v AC 60hz 20w
output: switching 3, 4.5, 6, 9, 12 v DC 1000 mA
Class 2 power supply
It uses adaptplugs but the only one I have (N) plugs into the SFC and Genny 1.
RadioShack support says it is Regulated.

vlame wrote:SFC Model 1
AC 100V 50/60HZ
18VA
DC 10V 850mA
pos --( o-- neg

i didn't think it was the same as snes, but i guess it is. can anyone confirm?

Re: AC Adapter Compilation

Posted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 2:03 pm
by alienjesus
Just posting now that I can confirm that the PAL Master System plug seems to work with my Game Gear. At least I think that's the right plug. I seem to have 3 different fat Sega Plugs.

Re: AC Adapter Compilation

Posted: Fri Oct 21, 2011 12:54 am
by vlame
So I am trying to splice a snes power cord up from a dead snes and a semi functioning sfc power. I cut them both to the middle so I have a lot to work with. What bothers me is the snes stock power cable has a black wire which I think is ground and a 2nd uncovered wire (live?). But the sfc has red (live?) and white (ground). Which should I connect? The sfc should be fine to power the snes bc it is rated at AC 100v 50/60hz - 18VA - DC 10v 850mA and the snes one says AC 120v 60hz - 17w - DC 10v 850mA.

Thanks.

Re: AC Adapter Compilation

Posted: Sun Oct 23, 2011 2:57 pm
by Ziggy587
Do you have a multimeter? If you don't, you should really pick one up. You can get a decent one for not a lot of money at all. Just make sure it does at least AC/DC voltage and resistance (Ohms). Automotive stores usually have decent ones with lots of settings for fairly cheap. Or any electronics type of store like Radio Shack, or hardware stores.

This is how I do it: First, put both power adapters back to "stock" so that they are the way they were before you cut them (you can just twist the wires together real quick - this is just temporary - leave the wires exposed BUT make sure they aren't touching!). Since both adapters output DC voltage, put your meter on the DC setting. The plug that you would plug into the console, this is the plug you'll be examining with the meter. Plug the adapter into an outlet. Take your probes, stick one in the center of the plug and touch the other probe to the outside of the plug. This is safe to do as long as you're sure you're using the right setting on the meter (AC or DC - in this case DC) and that you don't cross the connections. Now look at your meter's reading. Note if it's giving you a negative or positive number. This is how we find out the polarity of the plug (tip positive or negative) if there's no indication.

Anyway, now that you know the polarity, unplug the adapter from the outlet and put your meter on the continuity setting (if your meter doesn't have a continuity setting, like my old cheap meter, use a resistance setting - I usually would put it on K or M Ohm - when the meter reads a resistance of 0, that's when the continuity setting would beeeeeep). Touch one probe to one part of the plug, then touch the other probe to one of the spliced wires. This will let you know which wire is positive and which one is negative.

Now, repeat all that for the other plug. After identifying each wire, I recommend marking it so you don't forget. Put a little piece of masking tape around the wire and write "+" or "positive" on it. Or if you don't have masking tape, just put a piece of any tape on the positive wire, or mark it with a paint marker, etc.

Anyway, this procedure will let you know which wire is positive and which is negative on each plug. All there is left to do is to twist the appropriate wires together, solder them if you can, then insulate them with electrical tape or heat shrink tubing or whatever.


PS: I'm guessing the bare wire is ground (or negative) and the black insulated wire is positive. Usually when you see bare wire wrapped around an inner insulated wire, the outer wire is ground.

Re: AC Adapter Compilation

Posted: Sun Oct 23, 2011 4:18 pm
by vlame
thanks, i'll do this, i took the snes to the retro store y-day and it didn't turn on with one of their new 3rd party bricks.

Re: AC Adapter Compilation

Posted: Sun Oct 23, 2011 4:24 pm
by Ziggy587
Well I wouldn't exactly trust that. Most of the current 3rd party power adapters are just complete shit.

If the SNES doesn't turn on, I would check the fuse inside. You'll need a multimeter for this, as well as a security bit to open the console.